228A and 228b

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by blacky, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. blacky

    blacky Member

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    Does anyone know why there is two 228 troops?

    They have the letters A or B after them but how come ?

    Normally it just moves onto the next number.
     
  2. The Worrier

    The Worrier Active Member

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    Hi Blacky,
    This was down to the unusual large troop size of 228 as it progressed through training gaining a lot of lads from Hunter and original nods staying the course so the troop had to be split to be more manageable in phase 2.

    Not sure if this is something that happens often as I've only heard of troops merging due to low numbers?

    Ninja would know for sure.
     
  3. blacky

    blacky Member

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    Thank you that's great.

    Was just interested to see if they were possible test troops with varying ages or something.

    I thought the troop would of only taken in from hunter if the space allowed it. Would be interesting to see how they amended the training programme for this as potentially you could have an original who did 34 weeks rather than 32 if put in b troop rather than a.
     
  4. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando

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    As mentioned Troops normally merge because of low numbers, it used to be around 12, although mine passed out with 11.

    I believe that 228B marked time for two weeks, which I guess would have been spent getting to know the new training team and revising military skills. It would have also given those Nods with small injuries time to recover, so not all bad!

    Alan
     
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  5. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    228B ? Isn't that where Sherlock Holmes lived on that street by Gerry Rafferty?
     
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  6. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando

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    Elementary, my dear Ninja, elementary!

    Alan
     
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  7. Bluebear

    Bluebear Moderator

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    Caversham is correct. Troop 228 was too large, so 228B marked time while 228A carried on. 228A passed out on Friday. The original troop remained large but lots came into the troop from Hunter too.
     
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  8. Chelonian

    Chelonian Well-Known Member

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    98% of forum users: "Gerry who?" :)
     
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  9. blindman3004

    blindman3004 Member

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    I was in this troop before wrapping and banging my chit in. There were over 60 lads! 228 battalion *text deleted* As previously said there were a lot of back troopers.
     
  10. TangoAlpha

    TangoAlpha Member

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    Why did you wrap? Do you regret it?
     
  11. Mitchr

    Mitchr New Member

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    My dad is good friends with Simon Rafferty, his cousin or brother or someting, I can't remember now.. :)
     
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  12. Chelonian

    Chelonian Well-Known Member

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    Baker Street is a top tune. A bit before my time, obviously but... :)
     
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  13. blindman3004

    blindman3004 Member

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    My mate passed out last week and I was definitely jealous but the job just wasn't for me. I just didn't want it enough.

    I hated wet and dry with a passion and being cold.... ooohh the windy cold, thought of it still give me shivers :eek::eek: hahaa. Fully expected to be cold wet and miserable during recruit training and I thought I could just get on with it. It takes a really strong driven mindset to just crack on through for 32 weeks+ injury or backtroop etc..! Fair play to lads I met still hanging in! It was life experience Ill never forget and I'm glad I tried!
     
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  14. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Gertcha.
     
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  15. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando

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    A good honest answer! Guys really underestimate the cold realities of RT, (pun intended). It takes a particular person to push through the discomfort of being cold, wet, tired and hungry with no end in sight, whilst you are on exercise on the moor.

    The job isn't for everyone, so once again, thank you for being honest and the very best of luck in whatever career you pursue.

    Alan
     
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  16. blacky

    blacky Member

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    Takes a strong person to complete RT but also to admit it wasn't for them. Most normally can't admit it.

    What is your plans now?
     
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  17. arny01

    arny01 Ex Pongo.

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    Maybe?? Just maybe the bad memories will fade, and you'll realise that the desire you once had will come back? I spent the best years of my life in an Infantry battalion thinking life on Civvie was better! A huge case of "The grass is greener" I left, with potentially excellent career prospects I was a Lance jack at 18, A Cpl by 22 and decided to wrap!

    Biggest mistake I ever made! However it's only now that I'm going into middle age that I realise my mistakes!!

    My other mistake was not striving to be a part of the Royal Marines! As a 17 year old kid, I just wanted to shoot guns, and camp out in the field! :confused: So my careers officer stuck me into my local Inf Regiment!! I didn't have a clue about the Royal Marines at all. My first encounter with Booties was in NI and I've held them in the highest regard ever since! Their attitude, values and professional approach perfectly matched what I envisaged soldiering to be!! And it's something that I'm gutted to have not been a part of!!


    Be very very careful!! Because at this moment in time, you may well be happy with your decision, but in 5, 10 or even 15 years time you may well look back with huge regret!! And I would strongly urge you that if you feel even the smallest spark is still there! Then get back, and finish what you started! The rewards are so worth it!! And life on Civvie Street is certainly not all its cracked up to be!!

    Put me under a poncho in Sennybridge with good oppos rather than the humdrum of Civvie Street any day!!
     
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  18. Old Man

    Old Man Ex-Matelot

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    Arny, could you give us a few examples of the differences you saw between the RM and The Army re attitude, values and professional approach at that time or since, please?
     
  19. arny01

    arny01 Ex Pongo.

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    Yes Of course!

    I can only give my view of my personal unit.

    There was a huge focus on the camp side of things, whilst discipline is and was vital, my unit would insist on bulled toes with working dress! recruit training like levels, or even more stringent in a lot of cases towards the bullsh1t side of things. we actually painted a patch of yellow grass green, for a VIP visit! I once seen a 14 day jail sentence handed to a lad for a small double crease in his denims!(admittedly he did show "attitude" to the inspecting officer) there wasn't any freedom to think outside the box as far as soldiering was concerned either really! it was a case of do as your told and shut up! even if it was a glaringly bad decision. Some people will I guess, see this approach as important for a line Inf Battalion, and some people will probably agree the above points are very important!!

    On exercises only issued kit was to be used! in an era where warm kit consisted of long johns and a wolly pully and Gore tex was just emerging! it was never ever allowed! nothing other than issued stuff was ever to be used. Cold weather injuries were common! and as you can imagine Boots Combat high aren't the best in -5 degree temperatures? I actually did however enjoy the soldiering aspects of the job. I enjoyed being in the field, I just couldn't see the point of forcing someone to be cold and wet for no particular need? surely anyone can be cold wet and miserable?
    we as a unit had zero flexibility to use our initiative to make things better.

    I found the total opposite was the case with RMs I had the pleasure of working with. Professionally, It wasn't about how bulled your toes were or, how sharp your creases were in your denims. It was about tactical awareness, team players and more emphasis was placed on being good at soldiering rather than how shiny your shoes were?

    RM only bull the toes of their best boots/dress shoes. We had to bull our Boots combat high up to the 4th eyelet. However when Royal goes on parade their toes are nice and shiny! when I put my boots on, and took one step, all the polish cracked and fell off! we weren't allowed to use Beeswax!!

    That being said I did enjoy the time that I spent serving overall! mostly the lads and there were good times too! nostalgia is a funny thing tho!


    hope the above answers your question?
     
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  20. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando

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    Interesting insight @arny01 and one shared by my Nephew who served for around 25 years, starting off as a Tanky and finishing in the AGC. He served in every operational area, from GW1 to Afghanistan, where he completed 3 tours. He finished his time at Brigade in Aldershot as a WO2 and was really *text deleted* off with some junior officers who treated him and his soldiers as though they were recruits.

    After having crossed swords with one particular Major he was informed that he would be returning to the Ghan for a fourth tour, for "experience". This was from someone who had one campaign medal against my Nephews 7 or 8, plus commemoratives! Needless to say he didn't return and the Army lost an experienced, but disillusioned soldier.

    How did you find the Parachute Regiment? My experience of them was that they had a similar outlook to the Corps. More concerned about getting the job done than how well their boots were polished!

    Alan
     
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