A bit of advice?

louis07

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As said not much firing is done. There are a couple of weekends through training where you’ll live fire. Sometimes there will be DCCT time (Dismounted Close Combat Trainer) - a PlayStation with adapted issued weapons - to hone skills. Also, as said there is the annual ACMT (Annual Combat Marksmanship Test), along with the small matter of the shoot included in the endurance course.

With the comment re: “as a younger lad I would lean towards regular” - I initially find myself disagreeing *but* quickly tending to agree, the right circumstances. Without those circumstances RMR is good and if you can get time at a unit - be it an FTRS or mobilisation - then I think the “itch” will be scratched - depending on your reasons for joining.

Sounds good to me, I think my civvie perception is probably that you guys are always on the ranges etc. I imagine budgets just don’t allow for that though.

My circumstances are really about securing a really good qualification that I could always rely on to pay the bills and have a decent caree, or turning that down and potentially not even making it through RT for potentially something out of my control, I.e. a nasty injury. Not to sound to pessimistic that is, just trying to be realistic.

I like the idea of the reserves as it would allow me to do both, providing I make the cut that is. But I’d still have the chance to deploy if I am in the position to obtain a FTRS with a unit or if something kicks off and they require it, which like you suggested is the main attraction to me.
 

R4Robotics

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Ah right, that sounds pretty decent then.

I did originally want to go down the regular route, but to be honest, I’m kinda torn between accepting a guaranteed all paid for higher education qualification whilst working (which will take probably 3-4 years to complete), or go for it full time and risk getting injured and then not have anything!

I don’t hate what I do / will be doing in my current career, but I have always wanted to be part of something more purposeful at the same time, that being the Marines in my case.

The only realistic way I could potentially do both would be to go down the reserves route from the looks of it.

Thanks again.
Don’t throw away your civvie career for the Marines. 3-4 years time (assuming time is on your side) the marines will still be there. Get your quals and then re-assess. Maybe the reserves will itch that scratch you have. If not you can take a year out of your career and join a unit on FTRS. Then you can make an educated decision on your future.
 

R4Robotics

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Sounds good to me, I think my civvie perception is probably that you guys are always on the ranges etc. I imagine budgets just don’t allow for that though.

My circumstances are really about securing a really good qualification that I could always rely on to pay the bills and have a decent caree, or turning that down and potentially not even making it through RT for potentially something out of my control, I.e. a nasty injury. Not to sound to pessimistic that is, just trying to be realistic.

I like the idea of the reserves as it would allow me to do both, providing I make the cut that is. But I’d still have the chance to deploy if I am in the position to obtain a FTRS with a unit or if something kicks off and they require it, which like you suggested is the main attraction to me.
Looks like we are of the same thinking (sorry didn’t read this before replying.

an injury is very realistic and something we’ve not covered in your Q&A however in the reserves you will be kept on the books while you mend. I have known lads take 3 years to pass due to injury and other factors.
 

louis07

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Looks like we are of the same thinking (sorry didn’t read this before replying.

an injury is very realistic and something we’ve not covered in your Q&A however in the reserves you will be kept on the books while you mend. I have known lads take 3 years to pass due to injury and other factors.

Aha no problem, easily done.

Yeah, I do agree with what you said In regards to not chucking away my civvie career, as it makes the most logical sense and god forbid any bad injuries did happen during RT, I’d still have something to fall back on until fully recovered or indefinitely.

I think once my fitness it up to scratch and I definitely know what’s happening with my job & qual (time wise), I’ll express my interest to a recruiter and get the ball rolling.

Appreciate the advice on this!
 

highland_blue89

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I don't look at them differently, or treat them differently and neither does anybody else.

They chose to go reserves for their own circumstances regarding home life or personal reasons etc and couldn't commit full time. Like all across the Tri services ,they are called upon/volunteer when needed to supplement the numbers.

It's the bit about transferring to full time after FTRS

It's just my personal opinion(and a few others) that if going full time, you used to start day 1 like a nod. It's hard to explain on here mate, but the mental hardship side of recruit training isn't replicated in reserves training which I believe , arguably, is the true marker if you can cut it or not.

Going through my ROP at the minute.

My CSgt made the point that applying as a reserve throws up its own difficulties. I'm not saying its as hard as the regulars, not by a long shot i'd imagine, but it has its own challenges.
 

Jaykay2343

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Going through my ROP at the minute.

My CSgt made the point that applying as a reserve throws up its own difficulties. I'm not saying its as hard as the regulars, not by a long shot i'd imagine, but it has its own challenges.
I totally get that it has its own challenges. The time frame involved,work/home life balance etc, trying to commit 100% into something that you don't have 100% time and effort to do and the sacrifices involved.

The point I'm saying, I found the hardest part of RT for regulars was the mental side. Constantly being disturbed, sleep deprived, missing famiky and home life, cold and wet for a whole exercise to come back to camp with a thredders training team ready to mess you around if you underperformed on ex. I can't describe it on here but I spent the majority of time in RT living on edge ,filled with dread to what was round the corner and coming next.

I don't mean this as an insult, as it may sound it, but reserves go home after ex and can recover, and reset...CTC does not allow that luxury.
 

highland_blue89

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I totally get that it has its own challenges. The time frame involved,work/home life balance etc, trying to commit 100% into something that you don't have 100% time and effort to do and the sacrifices involved.

The point I'm saying, I found the hardest part of RT for regulars was the mental side. Constantly being disturbed, sleep deprived, missing famiky and home life, cold and wet for a whole exercise to come back to camp with a thredders training team ready to mess you around if you underperformed on ex. I can't describe it on here but I spent the majority of time in RT living on edge ,filled with dread to what was round the corner and coming next.

I don't mean this as an insult, as it may sound it, but reserves go home after ex and can recover, and reset...CTC does not allow that luxury.

Not at all mate, I get where you are coming from. I was drained after the intensity after one weekend of ROP. We didn't even have that much phys, it was more due to the unknown of what's next and the zero time to yourself. Going through the regular route must be tough AF.
 

Jaykay2343

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Not at all mate, I get where you are coming from. I was drained after the intensity after one weekend of ROP. We didn't even have that much phys, it was more due to the unknown of what's next and the zero time to yourself. Going through the regular route must be tough AF.
It's gets better with time when you get used to it mate and it becomes more bearable

All the best and hope you smash it pal
 
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