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A long road... Third time lucky? Joining even possible?

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by H01ty, Dec 28, 2018.

  1. H01ty

    H01ty Active Member

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    Hi all. Short backstory: I was an RMR nod whilst in uni, got to the RFCC before having a bit of a shocker and failing. Chose to leave and go regular after uni. Started regular training much better prepared in 2016, sustained a head injury extremely early in training and, without wanting to be too provocative, was essentially removed from training by a civilian doctor that I’m informed has now been removed from his post because several lads were ‘seen off’ in similar ways (he basically told me to use welfare and leave with the option to rejoin, or that he’d MD me without option to rejoin). I took the chit option so RM was still possible.

    On leaving I was given a 6 month return but have sat on it until now because my civilian career is a bit of a winner, working as an outdoor adventure guide between Dubai and Hong Kong, with lots of other short international trips thrown in. However, the idea of a career in the Corps still burns, I’d say more than ever. Now fitter than I’ve ever been whilst joining RM, and the last few years abroad have given me a self confidence I didn’t previously have.

    Do I have any hope of being granted a third crack at training? And now I hold residency in both the UAE and UK, but have always maintained a UK address and never converted to permanent residency status, will I require a residency waiver to rejoin?

    If RM absolutely isn’t an option I’ve already been granted permission to go through the process for Sandhurst but the thought of being an infantry officer doesn’t light that same ‘fire’ that the thought of being an RMC does.

    TIA.
     
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  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    To be honest it always baffles me why individuals injured in training would choose to opt out rather than be medically discharged. Adminstratively and financially it benefits the service but definitely not the individual, particularly if the injury was caused as a direct result of recruit training.

    Besides, it doesn't matter what the Medical Officer states at the point of discharge, it's the decision made by the Senior Medical Officer, Service Entries (SMOSE), based on the history of the injury and the current medical standards for entry, which counts.

    If medically discharged with a service attributed injury, and denied the opportunity to rejoin, then it leaves the service open to costly compensation claims. If the individual voluntarily opts out of training there's limited scope for recourse.

    My advice? Apply and see what happens, if you really intend joining and completing training. Let us know what the outcome.

    If you hold a UK passport and have lived overseas for six continuous months outside of UK, a residency waiver for security clearance can be requested.
     
  3. H01ty

    H01ty Active Member

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    Certainly something interesting to read in hindsight, and something I wasn’t aware of.

    Is it still possible to fast track elements of the process? My psychometric will still be valid until about June, and at least for Jan-Apr I’m going back to HK. It’d be good to complete the recruiting process in time to start training about September.
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    My guess is HK residency may delay Security Clearance unfortunately, unless kept valid through employment. The recruit test remains valid 3 years, rhe rest of the application elements remain valid 12 months or less. SC, unless physically transferred, only remains valid for a month after leaving the service.
     
  5. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    This advice should be printed, laminated and handed to all Recruits, their Partners and Parents.
     
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  6. H01ty

    H01ty Active Member

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    Thankfully both UAE and HK residency have been only valid through employment. Leave the job, lose the visa. Regarding your separate direct message; it seems HK and the UAE both have security agreements with the UK, but UAE may be a wobbly one after the whole PhD student ‘spy’ scandal!

    Thank you for the responses. Suppose rejoining could be a very long road indeed then, but something I’ll pursue and see what the outcome is.
     
  7. H01ty

    H01ty Active Member

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    Update for anyone in a similar position (anyone that’s perhaps been an English teacher overseas etc and is considering the forces, or other outdoor instructors like myself):

    Had a researched response from a Capita candidate manager for an army role I’ve looked into, saying that assuming you’re a British citizen and passport holder, and your overseas visas are tied to employment (as opposed to permanent residency), there is no bar or delay in entry. For roles that require DV clearance (intelligence, SF reserve) you “may be advised to be in the UK for 6-12 weeks prior to application, so as to be contactable for interviews and have an established UK address” but there is no ‘residency waiver’ required as such. Whether DV would be granted to those applicants is not certain and would come down to whatever criteria they assess against, but you are able to apply the conventional way.