Am I running too much?

IJ5876

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Good morning lads,

How many miles of running per week would you all say has given you the best results? Some sources I have read say that running any more than 25 miles per week has no benefits while others say that elite runners who can run a four-minute mile run well over 50. Would a weekly running plan of closer to 30 miles per week with sufficient rest and recovery result in better performance or should I be getting in as many miles as I feel I can handle? I am currently already up to a full score on both the BFT and bleep test but I don't like aiming for any less than the best that I am capable of and I am sure I can still do better. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

Cheers all and have a good one.
 

HoldFoldEm

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I'm not going to provide any advice with regards to the best method to get there, but with regards to your statement 'aiming for any less than the best I am capable of' - make sure you take into account longevity, being in peak physique for months before the test but then get injured as you're always trying to attempt new PR's or more arduous tasks, could also lead to a setback (from my experience).

Best,
R
 

Mattys

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@IJ5876

How many miles you currently running now?

In all honest if your getting high levels on the beep test and your BFT time is great I wouldn’t change anything your doing. Some people run 15 miles a week some run 40+ a week just depends what your training for.

The only reason I would suggest to run more is for those who are trying to get better at running.
If your running is great then id just say keep what your doing don’t change it and just keep the things your tested on ticking over.
You go balls to the walls and start and more miles to an already long mileage week then you can cause yourself an injury and all that you have achieved will have to be worked for again.

Keep what your doing
 

IJ5876

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I'm not going to provide any advice with regards to the best method to get there, but with regards to your statement 'aiming for any less than the best I am capable of' - make sure you take into account longevity, being in peak physique for months before the test but then get injured as you're always trying to attempt new PR's or more arduous tasks, could also lead to a setback (from my experience).

Best,
R
I do remember hearing in a podcast that some recruits attend RT having trained so frequently that despite their fitness levels they get injured early on. I'm just concerned that if I lower the amount of training I am doing too much then I will lose some progress. Although I would rather go that way than get injured early on so I'll take that on board. Cheers for your response.
 

IJ5876

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@IJ5876

How many miles you currently running now?

In all honest if your getting high levels on the beep test and your BFT time is great I wouldn’t change anything your doing. Some people run 15 miles a week some run 40+ a week just depends what your training for.

The only reason I would suggest to run more is for those who are trying to get better at running.
If your running is great then id just say keep what your doing don’t change it and just keep the things your tested on ticking over.
You go balls to the walls and start and more miles to an already long mileage week then you can cause yourself an injury and all that you have achieved will have to be worked for again.

Keep what your doing
I'm currently running around 40 miles per week. I would say my running is good so I will take your advice and maintain my current schedule while focusing my efforts on some of my weaker points. Cheers for the response, it's much appreciated.
 

Mattys

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I'm currently running around 40 miles per week. I would say my running is good so I will take your advice and maintain my current schedule while focusing my efforts on some of my weaker points. Cheers for the response, it's much appreciated.
As said mate people are just different with there running routines.
Some people can just run 10-15 mile a week and keep their running ticking over.

I posted on here 4 weeks ago now that my AFCO recruiter I spoke to (a marine) asked what my running routine was in the week and how much I run (15 miles) spread out over 4/5 runs. I was told you don’t need to run a lot of miles per week 2/3 quick 5 milers and a BFT is enough running a week as you don’t do long runs in training you just have to be quick over shorter distances as you do a lot of camp circuits (800m sprints etc)
Then some might go out and tell you do 10+ milers 2/3 a week with sprint sessions it just varies for everyone how they go about doing it.
Just keep doing what your doing you only need to change it if it isn’t working.

best of luck
 

Harry McRunFast

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@IJ5876

I was running 40+ per week up until recently mate. It can be a little daunting to think you might be throwing away your hard work, but you won’t, especially if you supplement your running with other forms of cardio.

Keep the long run in there, I’m sure you’re capable of running 10-12 miles... the long run is a key workout! Also, keep some speed work in there too and you’ll be fine, honestly.

I’ve recently reduced my running by about about 40% (reduced by 2 days per week), however I’ve been able to do other less impactful forms of cardio. Just keep the hours the same if you can, for example, if you were running 5 hours per week, but reduce to 3, try and get another couple of hours of other types of cardio in!

As someone who’s run a max score BFT time, I can tell you it’s a lot harder to get there on lower mileage than it is to maintain it on lower mileage.

Throw in some interval workouts where you swap between stuff like burpees, squats, box jumps, and rowing/cycling. I’ve found them to be very good!

Hope this helps.
 
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Johnny_Anonie

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I am currently already up to a full score on both the BFT and bleep test but I don't like aiming for any less than the best that I am capable of and I am sure I can still do better.

That is a fantastic attitude to have. Aiming for maximums and not minimums is definitely the way to go.

I'd also work in a good amount of all round bodyweight circuits. Definitely a good even mix of core strength, upper body and lower limb muscle groups. This coupled with your running will undoubtedly help get you to a good place for ROP/RT.


Prior to All Arms P Coy I trained very hard but like @Harry McRunFast I also tapered my phys off for 2 weeks before the course. I reduced my training to a few slow, gentle runs a week, or cross training activities like cycling and swim circuits. This allowed me to arrive on course fit, fresh, well rested and most importantly injury free. There are some real phys monsters on this forum and I’m sure you’ll be able to tap into some great knowledge. Have a look at the last workout thread also by clicking HERE


Best of luck with it all!
 

Caversham

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Good morning lads,

How many miles of running per week would you all say has given you the best results? Some sources I have read say that running any more than 25 miles per week has no benefits while others say that elite runners who can run a four-minute mile run well over 50. Would a weekly running plan of closer to 30 miles per week with sufficient rest and recovery result in better performance or should I be getting in as many miles as I feel I can handle? I am currently already up to a full score on both the BFT and bleep test but I don't like aiming for any less than the best that I am capable of and I am sure I can still do better. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
My bold.

Elite runners will be up around 100 miles a week. I was running between 30 and 60 miles a week in marathon training with an average speed of around 7.30.

Since PRMC is no longer with us, where we used to suggest a weekly 8 miler, your current mileage should be around 25 per week, but you need to incorporate sprints, hills and circuits. Also don't forget the low impact stuff such as swimming and cycling.

Good luck

Alan
 

Chelonian

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Just to add to the comment by @Caversham if an elite runner is belting out 100 miles per week he or she will also allocate considerable time to the previously mentioned stretches and core conditioning plus rest and recovery.

I currently run about six miles daily, every day. Plus other stuff such as cycling and swimming. I do this at the pace of someone aged sixty and so it's not the high intensity stuff that many forum users here do. Myself and all my training partners (aged between 30 and 70) have experienced similar niggles and injuries which are associated with what my GP terms "overtraining".
I put the word in quotes because what my GP actually means by "overtraining" is not giving oneself sufficient recovery time (at least one non-running day) and a deficit of stretching.
 
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