An area of interest.

Discussion in 'Current & Military Affairs Discussion Forum.' started by Rover, Sep 29, 2017.

  1. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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  2. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Interestingly Somalia has the longest coastline on mainland Africa, around 3000km. At one time it was reputed to have the largest navy of any African country, with aid from Russia.

    Not the same these days although the coastline is still as long there is no Somali Navy as such. Each state having its own Maritime Police.

    Perhaps the best equipped being Somaliland and Puntland.

    Do not be misled into believing that the so termed ‘Federal Government’ of Mogadishu control geographical Somalia. They do not.

    Beach 3.jpg


    No problem finding a space on the beach.:cool:

    Bossaso PMPF.jpg


    A Patrol Boat of the PMPF.
     
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  3. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Pure speculation on my part, but 'someone' in the first image appears to be searching in vain for an ice cream kiosk. :)
     
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  4. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    I believe it had been hidden due to the rush by local ‘tourist’!

    A local tourist..jpg

    Where's my ice-cream???:(

    But not to worry it was soon found.

    Beach 1.jpg Beach 2.jpg
    Here it is.:)
     
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  5. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Somalia: At least 230 dead in Mogadishu blast


    The death toll continues to rise after the deadly blast

    A massive bomb attack in a busy area of the Somali capital Mogadishu on Saturday is now known to have killed at least 230 people, police say.

    Hundreds more were wounded when a lorry packed with explosives detonated near the entrance of a hotel.

    It is the deadliest terror attack in Somalia since the Islamist al-Shabab group launched its insurgency in 2007.

    It is not clear who staged the bombing, but Mogadishu is a target for al-Shabab militants battling the government.

    The aftermath of an explosion in Mogadishu

    President Mohamed Abdullahi "Farmajo" Mohamed has declared three days of mourning for the victims of the blast.

    Local media reported families gathering in the area on Sunday morning, looking for missing loved ones amid the ruins of one of the largest bombs ever to strike the city.

    Police official Ibrahim Mohamed told AFP news agency the death toll is likely to rise. "There are more than 300 wounded, some of them seriously," he said.

    Officials also confirmed that two people were killed in a second bomb attack in the Madina district of the city.

    Photos from the scene. In our 10 year experience as the first responder in #Mogadishu, we haven't seen anything like this. pic.twitter.com/cNxeDD86u6

    — Aamin Ambulance (@AaminAmbulance) October 15, 2017

    Skip Twitter post by @HassanIstiila

    The director of @AaminAmbulance services said they had carried an unknown number of dead and injured. #Somalia pic.twitter.com/1UM9bKvu0p

    — Somalia Live Update (@HassanIstiila) October 14, 2017

    Report

    End of Twitter post by @HassanIstiila

    A BBC Somali reporter at the scene of the main blast said the Safari Hotel had collapsed, with people trapped under the rubble.

    An eyewitness, local resident Muhidin Ali, told news agency AFP it was "the biggest blast I have ever witnessed, it destroyed the whole area".

    Meanwhile, the director of the Madina Hospital, Mohamed Yusuf Hassan, said he was shocked by the scale of the attack.

    "Seventy-two wounded people were admitted to the hospital and 25 of them are in very serious condition. Others lost their hands and legs at the scene.

    "What happened yesterday was incredible, I have never seen such a thing before, and countless people lost their lives. Corpses were burned beyond recognition."t

    The international community has been quick to condemn the attack.

    In a statement, the US Mission to Somalia said: "Such cowardly attacks reinvigorate the commitment of the United States to assist our Somali and African Union partners to combat the scourge of terrorism."

    UK Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: "My thoughts are with families of the victims, and the government and people of Somalia at this difficult time.

    "Those responsible have shown no regard for human life or the suffering of the Somali people. The UK will continue to support Somalia in the fight against terrorism."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-41621660
     
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  6. Bootra

    Bootra Royal Marines Commando

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    Thanks for these updates Rover. Having been fortunate enough to spend some time in that area of the world I like to keep an eye on what's happening out there.
    There's a reason so many nations are attempting to lay foundations down in East Africa, and as time goes on the political wrangling will heat up massively! Interesting times!
     
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  7. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Very true. It was clearly apparent to anyone there at the time (back in the mid-1980s) that China was heavily investing in sub-Saharan Africa. Just a personal opinion but Western interests were unreprepresented by (particularly) token CIA assets which were out of their depth due a lack of commitment to the region.
    China doesn't care about popular opinion or 'sound bite' media stuff. It relentlesy advances towards its objective.
     
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  8. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    http://somaliupdate.com/articles/10373/Report-on-Africa-China-Economic-Partnership-Challenges-Previous-Beliefs

    Interestingly the Chinese are looking at improving the port of Hobyo in the state of Galmudug. At the same time also improving the infrastructure by building new roads to service their new deep water port.

    The fact that Galmudug also contains large deposits of uranium may be connected with the Chinese ‘generosity’. Although Al Shabaab are said to be interested in controlling the uranium themselves.
     
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  9. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Why is the press reporting on Hurricane Ophelia but not the worst ever terrorist attack in Somalia?-banghead-

    If such an attack took place in the UK, or elsewhere in Europe – or frankly anywhere else in the West – it would plainly have taken centre stage for weeks

    It’s just possible you have heard about Hurricane Ophelia, the remnants of which are battering the Republic of Ireland and parts of the UK (and from where I’m sitting, appear to have turned the sky over London a strange shade of yellow).

    Given the British obsession with weather, perhaps it should be no surprise that the prospect of some 80mph gusts is dominating headlines. Handily too, the stiff breeze has turned up three decades after the Great Storm of 1987, which has provided an excuse for lots of recollections of Michael Fish telling people not to worry about hurricanes. (He’s usually misquoted but hey ho.)

    True enough, the Met Office has warned of there being danger to life so let’s not be too dismissive. Moreover, there is little more immediate or primordial than weather conditions – I’m the first to admit to a fair bit of cloud-watching over the years; what I can’t predict about the likely route and ferocity of a “passing shower” is, well, considerable.

    Nevertheless, it was notable this weekend that, aside from the ongoing sex abuse scandal enveloping Harvey Weinstein, few other news stories got a look in when it came to media front pages.

    In particular a truck bomb in the Somalian capital, Mogadishu, received moderately little attention, despite taking the lives of more than 300 people and injuring hundreds more. If such an attack took place in the UK, or elsewhere in Europe – or frankly anywhere else in the West – it would plainly have taken centre stage for weeks. As it is, it seems to have fallen into that category of grim attack in a far-off country beset by an Islamist-inspired, militant insurgency – nasty, of course, but not something that affects us directly and or about which we can do very much.

    Somalia, indeed, is far down the list of nations we might think of in that bracket of troubled places. We know all about Syria and Iraq; and quite a lot about Libya. Yemen is next in line; and of course the kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls by Boko Haram in 2014 brought awareness to the horror of Islamist terrorism in Nigeria.

    If we think much of Somalia it is probably in connection with pirates, although ironically the piracy problem has improved considerably in recent years. If not pirates, then our first thought may be connected to the UN and US intervention in the east African country in 1992 and 1993 – mainly because one battle during the international effort to bring order to Somalia was immortalised in the film Black Hawk Down.

    Inevitably, the situation in the country today is highly complex. A parliamentary election with full suffrage was planned for last year – the first democratic vote since 1969. In the event, ongoing civil strife meant there was an indirect election in which delegates appointed by senior clan leaders chose members of parliament on behalf of the people.

    With the United Nations backing the slow process towards democracy and African Union soldiers bolstering the government and its local law enforcement forces, al-Shabaab remains the primary opposition group. Having emerged from the Union of Islamic Courts which held sway in Mogadishu as recently as 2006, the terror group has gradually lost control of most urban areas. But it still has a few thousand fighters in its ranks and – as it proved once again this weekend – is capable of bringing mass slaughter to Somali streets.

    The notion of moral equivalence is bandied about far too easily, usually to suggest that relatively wealthy, predominantly white Westerners don’t care about relatively poor, mostly non-white foreigners in war-torn or disease-ridden places a long way away. It is, for the most part, an overly-simplistic narrative which seeks to downplay the perfectly reasonable interests (and fears) of ordinary folk in their own lives and their localities. News, fundamentally, is context-specific: to argue otherwise is disingenuous.

    Nevertheless, it is tempting sometimes to wonder if we should pay a little more attention to difficult political situations in far-flung parts of the world; and rather less to the potential consequences of a system of moderate low pressure in the Atlantic, no matter how much hot air it produces.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices...bomb-why-doesnt-press-report-it-a8003246.html
     
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  10. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Our—by which I mean Western society's—response to and the media coverage of events in Africa and the Middle East underscores how little we as a society care about the lives and the politics of these nations.

    A classic example is the bombing of the marathon in Boston, USA on 15 April 2013. The deaths of three people were headline international news for weeks. And yet on the same one day an orchestrated spate of bombings across Iraq resulted in the deaths of 75 which got barely a mention domestically, with perhaps the exception of BBC World Service Radio.

    I'm not quibbling about 'moral equivalence' here; I'm lamenting that we disregard what happens in troubled and developing regions at our peril.
     
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  11. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    'Pray for Mogadishu' is not trending, but Somalis are mobilising

    By Rozina Sini BBC UGC and Social News

    6 hours ago

    What usually happens on social media after a terrorist attack? A hashtag circulates beginning with "Pray for..." or "I am...". Users share images of the carnage, and people express an equal measure of sadness and defiance.

    But after deadly attacks on Saturday in Mogadishu, which claimed at least 281 lives, some social media users have been asking where the solidarity for Somalia is, and why there are no trending hashtags like those which have emerged after attacks in the US and Europe.

    Somalia truck bomb: American survives but loses relatives

    Mogadishu: Somalis protest against al-Shabab

    Somalia: At least 230 dead in Mogadishu blast

    Skip Twitter post by @innajongee

    If what happened in #Mogadishu had happened in Milan or Milwaukee or Middlesbrough we wouldn’t still be talking about Harvey Weinstein...

    Saturday's truck bomb was the deadliest terror attack in Somalia since the Islamist al-Shabab group launched its insurgency in 2007. Some bodies were burnt beyond recognition.

    Of those who were identified, one of the victims was Maryam Abdullahi, a medical student who was due to graduate the next day.

    Her father had flown to Mogadishu to attend her graduation but instead witnessed her burial.

    Heartbreaking stories like this are not dissimilar to those shared after violent attacks and natural disasters around the world when people lose their lives. Image copyright Anfa'a Abdullahi Image caption Maryam Abdullahi has been identified as one of the 267 people killed.

    Khaled Beydoun a professor of Law in Detroit, criticised the depth of media coverage in a social media post which has been shared hundreds of times on Facebook and more than 6,000 times on Twitter.

    "I hate comparing human tragedies, but the mainstream media makes you do it," he posted on Facebook. "There are no slogans claiming 'we are Mogadishu' and no catchy images floating around social media demonstrating solidarity."

    He is not alone in having this view. Between Saturday, when the attack took place, and the early hours of Monday morning the hashtag #IAmMogadishu had generated little over 200 tweets, but by Tuesday there were more than 13,000 tweets as social media users expressed their frustration over the lack of media attention the attacks were given.

    A number of vigils have been organised by Somali communities across the UK and US, including one on Tuesday organised by Kings College London's Somali society and assisted by UCL's Somali Society.

    Abdulkadir Elmi the President of the UCL Somali society said: "The main purpose of tonight is to show unity among young British Somalis.

    "Due to the lack of global solidarity we just want to show that there are people who do stand with Somalia."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs/trending
     
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  12. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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  13. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    It looks like a concerted, popular push-back against terrorist activity in Somalia.

    Meanwhile, the mainstream Western media maintains a deafening silence. Nothing new there, but depressing nonetheless. :(
     
  14. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    How Many Dead Somalis Does it Take for us to Care?

    Monday October 23, 2017 - 17:10:48 in Latest News by SomaliUpdate Staff Reporter

    For over a week now, since the shocking attack that killed hundreds of people in Mogadishu, I've been seeking to raise money for the only free ambulance service in the Somali capital.

    But as the days have gone I’ve noticed just how muted the public and official response has been to what – with 358 dead, 56 missing and 228 injured – must count among the world’s worst terror atrocities.

    On hearing the first reports and seeing pictures of the vast black plume of smoke, I realised this was unlike the typical, low-level terror attacks that have plagued Mogadishu. The Zoobe district was a lively area shaded by palm trees, full of small traders, businesses, hotels and cafes – with a busy four-lane highway cutting through it. At 3pm on the day, people were shifting gears: from primary school to home, from university to socialising, from siesta to work. Suddenly every building in the district was flattened, ash and dust billowing away to reveal total devastation – as if the district had seen months of war and heavy shelling.

    The remains of the first 165 unidentified victims were so badly damaged that what could be found was hastily buried in a mass funeral the next day. The truck bomb went off beside a fuel tanker so there are people who will never be traced, whose disappearance has left families emotionally and financially crippled. You see their names and faces on Gurmad252, a crisis response organisation staffed by volunteers who aim to identify the victims of the attack and raise funds for the survivors. Many of the missing were just starting their lives, unsurprising for a country where 62% of the population is under 24 years old: they include first division footballers (Mustaf Qoor), medical students just about to qualify (Maryan Cabdullahi), shoe-shiners (Catar Aden) and so many more.

    The militant group al-Shabaab, which has lost much of the territory it controlled in Somalia over the last few years, continues to snipe away at soft targets. It is yet to take responsibility for the Zoobe attack, but there is little doubt regarding its culpability.

    The famed make-do-and-mend resilience of Mogadishu is built on the reputation of groups such as Aamin Ambulance. I had first seen their work online, a few months ago, when they responded to a much smaller attack. They rushed to the scene even though security forces often fire at ambulances in the confusion of smoke and crowds. And when I contacted them via Twitter on the night of the attack their primary concern was not for themselves, but whether there would be another attack that they would not have the resources to deal with. Led by a dentist, Abdulkadir Adan – who was inspired by the work of the Pakistani humanitarian Abdul Sattar Edhi – the service rushes into danger zones in a fleet of second-hand ambulances that once belonged to the fire service of a tiny Japanese island. They needed radios urgently, Adan said, because they relied on mobile phones to communicate, and the network was jammed with people trying to locate loved ones.

    The GoFundMe appeal for Aamin Ambulance quickly took on a life of its own with donations from the supermodel Iman, the rapper K’naan and the group Coldplay: from Finland to South Korea, money arrives. We raised our target two times, and were elated when the United Nations donated 36 radios – so we could concentrate on other urgent supplies. I saw humanity and solidarity and didn’t think to ask who hadn’t been moved by this catastrophe – until I realised that London, my home city, had not marked this atrocity the way it has those in western cities: no flags at half-mast, no illumination of the London Eye in the blue and white of the Somali flag – not even a tweet from mayor Sadiq Khan. This failure to respond publicly was not inevitable but a choice – a choice that was not made in Istanbul, Toronto, Paris or Kuala Lumpur.

    So how many dead Somalis does it take to muster the kind of sympathy that gushes out for cities closer to home?.Well, it seems that 358 dead is too low. Despite some western newspapers, including the Guardian, putting the attack on their front pages, compassion seems to be ebbing daily. There are many out there who prefer easy, flippant excuses – "That’s the religion of peace for you” – than to use their imagination and curiosity to offer sympathy to an individual who suffers and grieves no less than they.


    Nadifa Mohamed is a British-Somali novelist.
    Donate at


    https://www.gofundme.com/HelpAaminAmbulance#

    http://somaliupdate.com/articles/10980/How-Many-Dead-Somalis-Does-it-Take-for-us-to-Care
     
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  15. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Bit out of left flank, but it's worth noting that Kenya has already started building a wall along the Border with Somalia because its having a lot of trouble with illegal immigration, arms smuggling and extremists crossing the border.
     
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  16. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Interesting. Although comparatively stable Kenya has struggled with its borders because of regional instability back to the Mau Mau issues of the 1950s and 1960s.

    In the early 1980s Kenya attempted to prevent nomadic tribes criss-crossing political borders, particularly across its border with Tanzania. That policy was as successful as one might expect. :)

    Arguably, one benefit of Kenya building a wall anywhere will be the employment of thousands. The second benefit will be to the Maasai people who will promptly dismantle the wall to construct twenty-first century kraals.
     
  17. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    The norm being to employ the locals to construct in their own tribal area. On completion big party and everyone thanked. Following day everything gone, to be found in the local markets at inflated prices. This is not just Kenya but is the 'business plan' in various other locations, Nigeria being one.
     
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  18. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    US carries out 1st airstrikes against ISIS in Somalia.


    By Abdi Guled and Lolita Baldor | AP By Abdi Guled and Lolita Baldor | AP

    Africa

    November 3 at 4:12 PM

    MOGADISHU, Somalia — The U.S. military for the first time has conducted two airstrikes against Islamic State group fighters in Somalia, where the extremists are a growing presence in a country long threatened by the al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab.

    The U.S. Africa Command said the two drone strikes killed “several terrorists” in northeastern Somalia, the first around midnight local time and the second later Friday morning. The strikes were carried out in coordination with Somalia’s government, the statement said.

    Local officials confirmed the airstrikes. At least six missiles struck in Buqa, a remote mountainous village roughly 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Qandala town in the northern state of Puntland, a Somali security official told The Associated Press. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

    These being the headlines to be found in the worlds media.

    One point of interest being that the location given "Buqa, a remote mountainous village roughly 60 kilometers (37 miles) north of Qandala town in the northern state of Puntland" places the target in the Gulf of Aden!!-banghead--banghead-


     
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  19. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    US Hits Basis of ISIS Affiliated Militants in Northeastern Somalia

    November 04, 2017 in Medicine

    In coordination with the Federal Government of Somalia, U.S. forces conducted two separate airstrikes against ISIS, in northeastern Somalia on November 3, killing several terrorists.

    While the results of the strikes are still being assessed, Africa Command said "several" terrorists were killed.

    Local officials confirmed the strikes.


    A statement to The Associated Press says the airstrikes were carried out early Friday in northeastern Somalia in coordination with Somalia's government.

    About six missiles struck the mountain village of Buqa, located in the northern Puntland state.Qandala Mayor Jama Mohamed confirms the airstrike, which he said sent terrified villagers fleeing.


    The group, which refers to itself simply as Islamic State, is a rival to the larger al Shabaab force, which is linked to ISIL's rival Al-Qaida and once controlled much of Somalia. Al-Shabab has been blamed for carrying out Somalia's deadliest attack last month, a massive truck bombing in the capital, Mogadishu, that killed more than 350 people.


    But ISIS-linked fighters who have split from the Somalia-based al-Shabab pose a growing threat in Puntland. In May, ISIS claimed responsibility for a deadly suicide bombing there, its first in Somalia.


    Friday was the first time USA forces went after Islamic State fighters in Somalia, but it wasn't the first time they've targeted militants there. "Importantly, the Islamic State has not officially acknowledged Mumin's pledge".


    That includes partnering with the African Union Mission in Somalia and Somali National Security Forces, "targeting terrorists, their training camps and safe havens throughout Somalia, the region and around the world".


    A report by United Nations experts monitoring sanctions against the Islamic State group noted in a report circulated in August the "terrorist threat" posed by its affiliates in Puntland.



    As reported IS/Daesh being a rival to Al Shabaab will we now see a ‘contest’ as to which group can create the largest atrocity so as to ‘prove’ which is the ‘stronger’. :(
     
  20. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Well worth reading the full article.


    Black Banners in Somalia: The State of al-Shabaab’s Territorial Insurgency and the Specter of the Islamic State

    Abstract: For the past year and a half, al-Shabaab has continued to take advantage of the ongoing political and security turmoil between Somalia’s federal government, regional state administrations, and other powerful social groups, including the country’s clans and sub-clans and minority groups. Militarily, the jihadi-insurgent group retains significant capabilities to launch a range of attacks targeting both military and “soft” targets, including major suicide-vehicle bombings inside the most secure areas of the country such as central Mogadishu. In 2017, the group also overran a number of African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) and Somali government military bases and forcefully reasserted itself in the northern Puntland region. Meanwhile, the Islamic State in Somalia, al-Shabaab’s main jihadi competitor, continues to lag behind it in terms of numbers, military capabilities, and media reach, though there are recent signs that the Islamic State-Somalia has been able to penetrate more deeply into the Afgooye area to the west of the capital and outside of its Puntland base.

    https://ctc.usma.edu/black-banners-...territorial-insurgency-specter-islamic-state/
     
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