Apprenticeship Training at CTCRM

Chelonian

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It may not be widely known but Recruits currently commence an apprenticeship at the start of Week 9 of Recruit Training.

The Training Delivery Manager (Apprenticeships) at CTCRM has agreed to give an overview of apprenticeship training and to answer questions about this aspect of CTCRM and its benefit to Recruits.

The agreed format at this stage is a Question & Answer style session. Some questions have already been drafted but if forum users have any of their own please post them in this thread. We’ll then submit them to the Training Delivery Manager. Please ask away. Thanks.
 

Chelonian

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Jack Fleming is Training Delivery Manager (Apprenticeships) at CTCRM and below he gives a brief overview of the Apprenticeship and also answers some frequently asked questions towards the bottom of this post:

"An Apprenticeship is a job with an accompanying skills development programme and is designed by employers in the sector.

The Naval Service has delivered apprenticeship programmes since 2002 and currently holds an annual contract with the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) to deliver an agreed number of level 2 and level 3 Apprenticeships. SO1 Naval Education and Apprenticeships (SO1 Ed & App) is responsible for the delivery of all education (including Apprenticeships) in the Naval Service. SO1 Ed & App is the RN Apprenticeship Contract Manager and directs the Naval Service Apprenticeship Programme (including RM).

At CTCRM the HM Forces Serviceperson Apprenticeship Standard runs seamlessly alongside Recruit training and is delivered and assessed by the Recruit Training Teams with the support of the Apprenticeship Cell. Funding for the Apprenticeship comes from the Large Employer Levy payment via the Royal Navy digital apprenticeship service account. All Recruits, regardless of age or previous qualifications will complete the Level 2 HM Forces Apprenticeship.

The Apprenticeship Standard, with a greater emphasis on the Skills, Knowledge, Attributes and Behaviours of the serviceperson, replaced the NVQ based apprenticeship and was introduced at CTCRM this year. The Standard includes on programme assessment and an End Point Assessment (EPA) that apprentices must complete to demonstrate competence in their role. The apprenticeship is delivered between weeks 9 and 32 of Recruit training; this is to allow for the high attrition rates in the first 9 weeks of training. However, to meet the requirements of the Apprenticeship Funding Rules (the minimum duration for apprenticeship training is one year) a further period of embedding skills and competencies takes place in Unit. The EPA consists of Military Tests Appropriate to the Service (MTAS) and a Synoptic Interview (SI), which collectively enable the apprentice to demonstrate competence. The SI will be carried out by Troop Commanders and the EPA process will be managed by the Independent Assessment Authority(IAA) and will take place once the minimum time on programme has been achieved.

Quality Assurance

Several layers of assurance exist to ensure the apprenticeship programme is compliant with external standards, spread good practice and actively engaged in Continuous Improvement.

a. Ofsted Inspections – As ESFA funded qualifications, the Royal Navy Apprenticeship programme is subject to Ofsted. Having been inspected in March 2018 and graded 1 overall, under current policies providers judged outstanding are not normally subject to routine inspection.

b. Provider Financial Assurance (PFA) - An ESFA team who conducts audit checks of learners to ensure authenticity and eligibility of Learners for Government funding.

c. Internal Audits – Babcock is contracted to provide annual internal audits of the Apprenticeship programme."

Some frequently asked questions:

Q1. Is the Apprenticeship optional for Recruits or compulsory?
"Compulsory."

Q2. Is there a choice of Apprenticeship subject?
"Not during Recruit Training, opportunities exist during specialisation training."

Q3. Does the Apprenticeship have value outside the Corps in civilian life?
"This is a recognised Level 2 Apprenticeship."

Q4. Are there opportunities for Recruits who are in Hunter Coy for the longer term to further develop their Apprenticeship Training?
"No, however they can progress their Functional Skills in English and maths."

Q5. Can Recruits apply for educational discount cards as they might at college?
"They can apply for the NUS Apprentice extra discount card."
 

Caversham

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There is a good article about civilian accredited qualifications for all ranks from Recruit up to WO1 in the latest Globe and Buster. Well worth a read.

Alan
 

Halcyon

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I'm not sure I entirely understand. I don't have a ton of knowledge on apprenticeships in general, but from what I know you would start say an apprenticeship as a metalworker or electrician to learn the trade, and progress into that job role when you're fully qualified. Is the subject of this apprenticeship soldiering? Or is this a separate mandatory skillset that you develop alongside 'green' skills in RT?
 

Chelonian

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...but from what I know you would start say an apprenticeship as a metalworker or electrician to learn the trade, and progress into that job role when you're fully qualified.
That is the traditional notion of an apprenticeship. A purely trade skills focused learning process.
Apprenticeships have evolved away from that over the past forty years.

I'll try to get a more in depth answer to the issue you've mentioned.
 
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