Are you training your mind

Old Man

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I've seen a few signatures about, saying things like -

Failure is not an option

and

I ran until (whatever), then I ran some more - there are many of the same ilk.

Then throughout the forum are the posts - Couldn't finish my run today (followed by excuse) - what's the worst part of prmc, RT, etc - what's the minimum target for...? - Don't fancy such and such.

I've also noted posts where the poster is obviously trying to extend himself (the Dartmoor exped for example)

So tell me folks, how many of you are training your minds.

And in what way?
 

pcampbell87

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How do you mean 'extend himself', are you refering to trying to better himself through the experience or trying to make himself seem better by telling others that is what he was doing?

As for the signatures, is that not part of training the mind? There are many ways of training your mind to help you through challenges. For example, when running, one option is to visualise your goal or to break the challenge down into smaller goals (e.g. telling yourself "I've just got to make to that tree" and then once there set the goal further). Another method is to use 'mantras' (I dont like that word but it fits) to keep pushing yourself, for example, telling yourself that "failure is not a option" and just keep on running.
 

Jervis

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I find that when you are sweating and your nearly out of water and you've still got two more laps, with a massive hill to run up and that familer stitch is trying to work its way threw your body... the thing i find helpful is literally to tell your body it can go *text deleted**text deleted* itself but right now its making its way up this hill and the next *text deleted**text deleted*ing hill... or short and sweet "*text deleted**text deleted* you body" never stopping.

Also trying to become acustomed to simple things which are unpleasant... i.e. jumping in cold water swimming pool without slowly doing it or having a cold shower.

Even things like letting your mate shoot you with a high powered AK47 automatic bb gun. (*text deleted*) (mainly to not fear a few seconds of pain)

When i'm in the dumps or some driver cuts me up and i *text deleted* jump out my car and kill him i remain calm try keeping calm all the time.

Forcing myself to wash iron and cook.

Theres a few things, but generally making myself choose the hard option all the time and further more to be happy doing it.
 

Death-Oar-Glory

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Then throughout the forum are the posts : what's the minimum target for...?


So tell me folks, how many of you are training your minds.

And in what way?

That first part really annoys me, people aiming for minimums. *text deleted*, you shouldn't even aim for a maximum, there is no celing when it comes to physical ability really.

In runs and cardio stuff, when I'm getting (as Ron Burgundy puts it) 'the deep burn' I just get aggressive with myself, and remind my body in a stern manner that I will tell it when it can stop, I will tell it when something's not possible, and I will tell it what to do, no other way. I make sure I take control.
When weights and stuff and I'm struggling ( I don't do weights often, more circuits) I just remind myself of the one time I did battle circuits with the marines, and how I felt training alongside some guys who had earnt a green beret. That spurs me on a huge amount.

As for 'Training my mind' I don't really know of any exercises one can do to train one's mind, but I try and do everything with the commando ethos in mind, and cheerfulness in the face of adversity is probably the one I use most, and it's amazing how effective it can be, not only for yourself, but for the people around you, for example when I'm training with my rowing team, and we've just done a 10k ergo, and have to get off to do a 10k run followed by a short circuits session, I inform them of my sweaty ballsack, and also inform them that I can almost guarantee that I'll be breaking qwind on the run, so anyone behind me should probably watch out.

Yeh, actually, that's how I do it, never really thought about it before, i just think 'how would a Royal Marine approach this?'

"There are no problems, just opportunities to improvise a solution that is waiting to happen"
 

AdmiralAwesome

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I let my mind wander on a hard run, when I'm thinking of giving up.

I think about people in a lot harder situations who've pushed on through. I read a lot of military non-fiction, so I find it easy to come up with examples where soldiers have pushed themselves to the limit and past it.

Recently, as I've been reading a book about the French in Indochina, the examples are all about that. The Sergeant who held his men together and made them march 20 miles a day for two weeks, through the jungle, behind enemy lines and with no food, to get them home when they were cut off.

Something like that really puts finishing a five mile run into perspective.

Also, the Muhammad Ali quote I read in someones signature on here always runs through my head:

"I hated every minute of training, but I said, ''Don't quit. Suffer now and live the rest of your life as a champion.''
 

Old Man

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How do you mean 'extend himself', are you refering to trying to better himself through the experience or trying to make himself seem better by telling others that is what he was doing? QUOTE]

I meant that he'd put himself through adverse conditions, knowing he'd be cold and wet, deliberately not taking a tent and extending the length of time involved from previous expeds. And treating it as an adventure.

A progressive training of both the body and mind, in my opinion.

The posts after yours adequately illustrate the fact that some people are indeed training their minds.

The official RM site mentions that one should also train the mind and stresses that one should never give up.

I was attempting with my post, to remind people of that, with a general question, rather than answer individual posts with what could be construed as criticism.

Having read through hundreds of posts here, I could have replied to some with -

'For god's sake stop whining. You want to be a Marine. Just get on with it.'

But I didn't think that would be helpful.

From all I've read, it would appear that a majority of people who fail prmc, do so because they have given up or have failed to prepare properly.

In other words, they have not trained their minds.
 

JimB

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Good thread.

I think the way i train my mind is just to put up with whatever. Just have in your head that "it won't kill me so just deal with it - you can relax later". Doing stuff like this has really helped me notice how much in control of my body i really am.

For example. I REALLY want to be a Royal. I know i have to run twice a week to get up to scratch. So when it's time for me to run, no matter what i should just go do it, right?? Doesn't happen like that for me yet. I need the "me" part of my mind to take command over the everyday part and say "*text deleted**text deleted* you, you're going out there in the pissing cold rain and you're going to run for three miles. Now go get changed".

I think i will feel my mind is fully "trained" when the everday part of my brain says "time for runnin, James, lets go!"
 

dj1uk3

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I don't really train my mind, I just keep it open. I absorb knowledge and skills and just learn and teach myself as I go along in life. I don't think the Commando 'State Of Mind' can be taught on civvy street, thats what they nail into you while you are at Lympstone. I think you either have it or you don't.

But what i can say is that my state of mind is getting stronger. The closer i get to RT the more determined, focused and composed i get.

I used to be "oh i'm not going for a run now because its raining"

or

"oh i've got a slight cough so i'm not going for a run"

Now I find that embarrasing and i would never do it. I push myself and force myself to do unbearable runs and workouts now, I never would have done that 6 months ago. And i see lads posting stuff like that but i also see that they have'nt got that far in the application process. They probably say that because they have'nt got anything to aim for yet. Once they do the PJFT, thats when things pick up and you start to become a different person, for the best!

If they are made of the right stuff then they will better themselves and realise what work they need to do to become a Royal Marine. A state of mind gets stronger without you realising it.
 

Stacka

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I've seen a few signatures about, saying things like -

Failure is not an option

and

I ran until (whatever), then I ran some more - there are many of the same ilk.

Then throughout the forum are the posts - Couldn't finish my run today (followed by excuse) - what's the worst part of prmc, RT, etc - what's the minimum target for...? - Don't fancy such and such.

I've also noted posts where the poster is obviously trying to extend himself (the Dartmoor exped for example)

So tell me folks, how many of you are training your minds.

And in what way?

I don't need to train my mind, I know I can do what I want when I want. Put a challenge in front of me and ill do it.

To me life is a challenge, so i never fail
 

pcampbell87

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I meant that he'd put himself through adverse conditions, knowing he'd be cold and wet, deliberately not taking a tent and extending the length of time involved from previous expeds. And treating it as an adventure.

That is the way I had understood it when I first read your post, I just wanted to clarify.

I think it is important to remember that there is a fair mix of people on this forum. Some have been in training previously, some have been on PRMCs, some are looking at becoming officers and some are quite young and looking to complete college or wait a couple of years before even filling out the form. Not everyone will have the state of mind of a Royal Marines Commando at present.

I agree that thinking about the minimum scores and worse case scenarios is not the best way to approach joining the Royal Marines but it is a way of reassuring yourself about something you are nervous about. If you know the minimum is x and you know can do 2x you can feel confident about the tests.

I remember when I first joined I didn't have the confidence and knowledge I do now and there were so many unknowns, I actually was on the train to CTCRM to begin training when I thought to myself I don't even know what the day to day of training is going to involve. It would have been a real help to have had the benefit of this forum back then, I could have asked loads of bone questions which would have given me extra insight and made me a lot more confident about the whole process.

There is no harm in training your mind at present and it will certainly be beneficial when starting training but do not underestimate the levels of confident and determination installed throughout training, especially in the early weeks.
 

Old Man

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well their is no format for "training your mind". Like I posted it comes with experience the ability to handle adversity. (What is the average age that fail PRMC?)
If youve failed to prepare then thats just bad organization skills

I dont know how you can relate the majority of the people who fail prmc is because theyve not "trained their minds" because most people do on the 3miler which is a test in which all candidates have taken before either through RMAD or PJFT or both. Which brings me to the conclusion of that its another unknown factor to why they have failed (nerves?too much for breakfast? god knows)

My criticism of you is that I think you write posts to piss people off. for eg saying why would we use navy slang on this forum when were civvies. Actually deciding to posts things such as
'For god's sake stop whining. You want to be a Marine. Just get on with it.'
But then writing "But I didn't think that would be helpful." Almost as this excuses you from trying to be a bit of a *text deleted** but why would you decide to actually write this? You must know its going to get a bit of a reaction somewhere so why not try and keep it to yourself?

Reading this very thread has "trained my mind" thanks

As evidenced by many of the replies to this thread, there are obviously formats to 'training the mind'. You even mention one yourself in 'the ability, with experience, to handle adversity.'

Nerves? Too much breakfast? - Excuses given to justify giving up.

I attempt to write posts in such a way as to not piss people off. I have no wish to criticise or condemn. I was attempting to make a point with a positive post about training the mind, rather than criticise somebody who complains about running while having a signature that suggests they'd continue to run no matter what.

Re Navy slang, I suggested it might be impolitic to use it on the official site, as it might piss off actual serving members. I accepted that I might be wrong in this.

As for trying to be a *text deleted**, your opinion must be, that either I am or I am not a *text deleted**.

To accuse me of 'trying' to be one is absurd.

And in conclusion, if it was my intention to criticise or offend, many posts on this forum give me ample opprtunity to do so.

But it is not. I simply offer an alternative perspective.
 

Stacka

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As evidenced by many of the replies to this thread, there are obviously formats to 'training the mind'. You even mention one yourself in 'the ability, with experience, to handle adversity.'

Nerves? Too much breakfast? - Excuses given to justify giving up.

I attempt to write posts in such a way as to not piss people off. I have no wish to criticise or condemn. I was attempting to make a point with a positive post about training the mind, rather than criticise somebody who complains about running while having a signature that suggests they'd continue to run no matter what.

Re Navy slang, I suggested it might be impolitic to use it on the official site, as it might piss off actual serving members. I accepted that I might be wrong in this.

As for trying to be a *text deleted**, your opinion must be, that either I am or I am not a *text deleted**.

To accuse me of 'trying' to be one is absurd.

And in conclusion, if it was my intention to criticise or offend, many posts on this forum give me ample opprtunity to do so.

But it is not. I simply offer an alternative perspective.

Any way fatty.....you got to 40 press ups yet?
 

Stacka

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...............no............ didn't think so.
 

Qwerty123

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I think every time we force ourselves outside to go for a run in the p*ssing rain, or keep on going when you're body wants you to stop, we're forging a stronger mind!

By going outside our comfort zones and doing things that are tough, it all makes the mind stronger, better prepared for what RM training may have in store.
 

TM

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I have to agree with Old Man when it comes to using Navy Slang on the forum.
 

Jervis

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I thought Old Man's question was a good one, didn't asume he was trying to irritate anyone... hence a few sensible answers.
 

Daz-PRMC

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Can you train it?

I'd say you either have it or you don't, as going out and cracking a hill session in the rain when you are knackered denotes a certain level of mental fortitude

Unless you're incredibly dense you don't make it to Lympstone without at least half an idea of what it's going to be like and what it requires
 

Old Man

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excuses for giving up? Surely you must have had ran in your life before and had a day when your food feels like its going to come up. You can feel it and if you dont stop you KNOW that its going to come back up. Which would result in being sick, which would lose you time and therefore potential to fail it.
But As I stated. Why would the majority of people fail the 3miler when theyve already passed it twice in RAMD and PJFT ?
And NO marshall I have friends in the forces who like it when civvies use slang as they can then continue to communicate in the way their used to when their at work instead of having to explain each time what getting "squared away" or saying "stand by" just before passing you a beer.
why would you look at posts in a way of "hmmm I have GREAT ample opportunity to offend and criticise here" Just tell me WHY would you even bother to think that?
Its down to experience having a state of mind that can handle adversity. I dont wake up in the morning and think "right, 3 miler, some weights then ill train my mind" its stupid and im getting slightly annoyed by agreeing you can now. Your not going to be put in a crappy situation just to train, it just comes through different scenarios and situations in life. With an older person having a slight advantage because of this.


I've had many times in my life when I've given up because I wasn't motivated enough to continue.

I am not Royal Marine material.

Then again, I've had some occasions when I have been motivated enough and carried on. So I happen to think that if you've trained for and previously achieved the 3-mile time, if you fail it at prmc, without being injured, then you've given up. You should also know whether you can do it on a full or empty stomach and eat accordingly.

You've misquoted me - I did not say GREAT ample opportunity.

Now this isn't just any old forum. It's for Potential Royal Marines - people who, if they succeed in their goal, will be fighting, in part, for my right to say what I think. So I don't wish to offend. I'm in awe of the desire to be part of such an organisation, especially in these troubled times.

Because my son wants to join and I want to encourage him, I've researched the subject. I've read virtually every post, posted since I joined the site and before I posted myself, read just about all the stickies.

I could, if so disposed, find fault with many of the posts for various reasons. But I choose not to. Instead I try to word posts to cause people to think about what they're saying and, as you say, to get a reaction.
 

TM

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I don't understand how you can just say "NO" Peter when there's quite obviously validity to both sides, but it just seems like people are jumping the gun a little bit by purposefully typing slang rather than it just coming out impulsively because that's what they find natural from experience.

So NO to you..
 

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