Army Offers Bounty For Rejoins

arny01

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I think the Royal Marines could learn a lesson here?

One of the Unique selling points of the Marines, is that it's hard, and great pride is taken in the Beret which is truly earned!! I think many young lads see the Marines and maybe the Paras as a chance to be the best they can be.

I think certain Army units used to have some pride attached? But the fact that a recruitment crisis occurred, caused a change to the culture and training methods.

At a guess I'd say the Army no longer offers what the best young men in society seek?
 

Chelonian

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At a guess I'd say the Army no longer offers what the best young men in society seek?

Definitely. Also, the Royal Marines and Parachute Regiment have clear identities (or brands perhaps) which arguably are lacking in many modern Army units.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Truth is, we aren't struggling to recruit RM Officers, there's been a consistent surplus of applicants passing both POC and AIB. Retention is a different issue and, to put it bluntly, some only join to enhance their CV, with the "average" only serving around five years - long enough to become a Captain, having served as a Troop Commander for the gung-ho stuff, then thinning out before they have chance to move up to Major and beyond.

Retention for Other Ranks is more problematic because those joining at, say 18, are often single and seek stimulation through risk and adventure. Odd though it may seem to some, after training for combat, they want to experience it and very often trained ranks come down to earth with a bump with life in a unit when it's far less demanding than recruit training and it dawns on them we are not actually at war at present.

The other major influence is that as partners and maybe children become part of the equation, the willingness to spend prolonged periods away from home or travelling to/from home over hundreds of miles, becomes a significant and expensive chore. The average Royal Marine currently serves 11 years, or so I'm told by out statisticians - I'm amazed it is that long!

According to the latest manning statistics, the Corps is at manning balance for Other Ranks and has a surplus of just ten officers. https://www.gov.uk/government/uploa...6/20171102_-_RN_RM_Quarterly_Pocket_Brief.pdf
 

Chelonian

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...then thinning out before they have chance to move up to Major and beyond.

Has this not always been a 'watershed' point for Officers' careers Ninja? Anecdotally, from an Army perspective many would opt to leave after serving as Captain; either to do other stuff or because it was made clear that they weren't considered suitable for higher command.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Has this not always been a 'watershed' point for Officers' careers Ninja? Anecdotally, from an Army perspective many would opt to leave after serving as Captain; either to do other stuff or because it was made clear that they weren't considered suitable for higher command.
I think the critical make or break point is Major to Lt Colonel for Royal Marines (it is for RN), as promotion to Major is pretty much a function of time served and all the boxes being ticked. True, there will be a few that don't tick all the boxes for promotion to Major, but they will have had five years service to reach Captain prior to that point. The days of speedier promtion due to unrelated academic attainment rather than ability have thankfully been ditched.
 

Caversham

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What I have found hard to understand in previous years is the refusal of the Corps to allow rejoins, with the exception of some very unique SQs, such as SF etc.

It used to be the case that when someone wanted to rejoin, they could only do so by taking an unpopular SQ, such as Clerk, Chef or Driver. It seems strange that they chose to train civilians, at great expense and no guarantee of the final outcome over the chance to re-employ fully trained Marines, who would only require a few weeks induction after re-entering through the gates of CTC.

However, from what is seen nowadays, the Corps will soon be in deficit and until a decision is made on what cuts the RN have to make, it will be interesting to see which way the pendulum swings.

Alan
 

Ninja_Stoker

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What I have found hard to understand in previous years is the refusal of the Corps to allow rejoins, with the exception of some very unique SQs, such as SF etc.

It used to be the case that when someone wanted to rejoin, they could only do so by taking an unpopular SQ, such as Clerk, Chef or Driver. It seems strange that they chose to train civilians, at great expense and no guarantee of the final outcome over the chance to re-employ fully trained Marines, who would only require a few weeks induction after re-entering through the gates of CTC.

However, from what is seen nowadays, the Corps will soon be in deficit and until a decision is made on what cuts the RN have to make, it will be interesting to see which way the pendulum swings.

Alan
I guess those wishing to leave then rejoin, with a minimum of four years served sometimes forget the reasons they cited for leaving at the time.

A rejoin is an easy win financially but older, wiser and having already left once, not likely to be as keen and career-minded as a fresh out the box trained rank.

Very often rejoins wish to rejoin as they realise that once outside in big, bad world of private enterprise, maybe life wasn't so bad. People leaving the services very often try to persuade others to do the same by bemoaning their lot.

A good many perceived faults within the services were maybe not that bad after all - particularly for those who join with little by way of prior civilian employment.

A disaffected individual leaving the service, then wishing to rejoin very often leaves again very soon, unfortunately.

At present we are once again accepting rejoins but usually with pre-conditions such as joining straight into a shortage SQ.

Given time I would not be surprised if we once again offer rejoin bounties in future.
 

Xerath

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Definitely. Also, the Royal Marines and Parachute Regiment have clear identities (or brands perhaps) which arguably are lacking in many modern Army units.

Amalgamations and today's modern PC society are to blame for that in my opinion. Many old traditions nowadays are frowned upon. Hanging the Brick (an old Guards tradition) doesn't happen anymore for 'health and safety' reasons
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Hanging the Brick (an old Guards tradition) doesn't happen anymore for 'health and safety' reasons
Illuminate me. (Unless it involves string, a brick & genitalia).

I've genuinely not heard of that one.
 

cc1

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The Corps could probably single handedly fix recruitment and retention overnight by offering "Commando Pay" by virtue of the fact that all Marines volunteer for 'arduous duties'.

Waive it for all those permanently downgraded and those on extension beyond their 22.

Admittedly it could cost the Navy around £20m per annum to give everyone a £10 per day bonus but it would be interesting to know what the Navy's annual recruitment budget is, vs what it spent on the 05-09 super retention bonuses, of which I was a very happy beneficiary!

If you make the lads feel valued they don't leave.
 

cc1

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Illuminate me. (Unless it involves string, a brick & genitalia).

I've genuinely not heard of that one.

I think it involved hanging sprogs from very high places via their ankles??
 

cc1

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Definitely. And it need not cost a penny. Some employers do it well.

Very true. Who was it that said "Train them well enough so that they can leave; treat them well enough so that they don't want to?"

Edit: As an aside the old truism always was: get them to stay in more than 8 years and they'll generally stay because of the pension trap.

I've always wondered if it was the pension that made them stay or due to the myriad of other "luxuries" like the Seniors mess = seniors 'club', responsibility and not being often treated like an idiot from the moment they wake up?
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Very true. Who was it that said "Train them well enough so that they can leave; treat them well enough so that they don't want to?"

Edit: As an aside the old truism always was: get them to stay in more than 8 years and they'll generally stay because of the pension trap.

I've always wondered if it was the pension that made them stay or due to the myriad of other "luxuries" like the Seniors mess = seniors 'club', responsibility and not being often treated like an idiot from the moment they wake up?

Simon Sinek said it I think, or he at least quoted it.

I am mixed about it and will jump in on the thread after shift.
 
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