Batting for the other team!!

MIKESW

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Im a little worried about the stigma (if there is one) around been gay in the RM? Can anyone advise on this subject?
 

Ninja_Stoker

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THE ARMED FORCES CODE OF SOCIAL CONDUCT
POLICY STATEMENT


1. This Code of Social Conduct explains the Armed Forces revised policy of personal relationships involving Service personnel. It applies to all members of the Armed Forces regardless of their gender, sexual orientation, rank or status. The provisions apply equally to members of the Regular and the Reserve Forces.


2. In the area of personal relationships, the overriding operational imperative to sustain team cohesion and to maintain trust and loyalty between commanders and those they command imposes a need for standards of social behaviour which are more demanding than those required by society at large. Such demands are equally necessary during peacetime and on operations. Examples of behaviour which can undermine such trust and cohesion, and therefore damage the morale or discipline of a unit (and hence its operational effectiveness) include: unwelcome sexual attention in the form of physical or verbal conduct; over-familiarity with the spouses or partners of other Service personnel; displays of affection which might cause offence to others; behaviour which damages or hazards the marriage or personal relationships of Service personnel or civilian colleagues within the wider defence community; and taking sexual advantage of subordinates. It is important to acknowledge in the tightly knit military community a need for mutual respect and a requirement to avoid conduct which offends others. Each case will be judged on its merits.


3. It is not practicable to list every type of conduct that may constitute social misbehaviour. The seriousness with which misconduct will be regarded will depend on the individual circumstances and the potential for adversely affecting operational effectiveness. Nevertheless, misconduct involving abuse of position, trust or rank, or taking advantage of an individuals separation, will be viewed as being particularly serious.


4. Unacceptable social conduct requires prompt and positive action to prevent damage. Timely advice and informal action can often prevent a situation developing to the point where it could impair the effectiveness of a Service unit. However, if the misconduct is particularly serious, it may be appropriate to proceed directly to formal administrative or to disciplinary action. Such action is always to be proportionate to the seriousness of the misconduct. It may constitute a formal warning, official censure, the posting of one or more of the parties involved or disciplinary action. In particularly serious cases, or where an individual persists with, or has a history of acts of social misconduct, formal disciplinary or administrative action may be taken, which might lead to termination of service.



5. The Service Test. When considering possible cases of social misconduct, and in determining whether the Service has a duty to intervene in the personal lives of its personnel, Commanding Officers at every level will consider each case against the following Service Test:

“Have the actions or behaviour of an individual adversely impacted or are likely to impact on the efficiency or operational effectiveness of the Service?

In assessing whether to take action, Commanding Officers will consider a series of key criteria. This will establish the seriousness of the misconduct and its impact on operational effectiveness and thus the appropriate and proportionate level of sanction.


PRINCIPLES

1. Sexual orientation is regarded as a private matter for the individual.

2. Knowledge of an individuals sexual orientation is not a basis for discrimination.

3. Incidents which involve the possible commission of civil or military offences, or which come to a Commanding Officers attention through a formal complaint, will be investigated and dealt with in accordance with Service disciplinary or administrative procedures.

4. The Service Test contained in the Code of Social Conduct will be applied when there is any doubt about the impact on operational effectiveness of any particular incident.

5. The Armed Forces value the unique contribution which every individual makes to operational effectiveness, regardless of their sexual orientation.

6. The Armed Forces respect the right to individual privacy of every Serviceman and woman and will only intervene in the private lives of individuals where it is necessary in the interests of preserving operational effectiveness.

7. The new policy makes no moral judgements about an individuals sexual orientation.

8. There is no place in the Armed Forces for harassment, bullying or victimisation.

9. Commanders have a duty of care towards all those under their command.
 

SamForrest

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With the amount of cross dressing bootnecks i know..... i wouldnt be suprised if half the corp was on the dark side !!
 

Ninja_Stoker

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In short, the Royal Marines are more interested whether you can do the job or not & your sexuality is the least of your worries when there's "lead wasps" inbound.
 

MIKESW

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Thanks for the response. If anyone else has any feedback, please let me know. Cheers
 

Mackie

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I know the official response on the issue is that the corp is only interested in your ability to pass recruit training but like any walk of life there are always going to be people with prejudices about being gay.

If you ask me, don't expect it never to come up when you're in the corp, especially during RT. That shouldn't stop you applying if you want it enough though.
 

MIKESW

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I wouldn't even mention it to be honest, if it comes out naturally as it were I expect your team mates will be more accepting of you rather than if you were to walk straight in and declare you are homosexual.

Concentrate on being a good soldier and your sexuality shouldn't be an issue, although you could probably expect to have the mickey taken out of you a bit.

At the end of the day it will only be a major issue if you choose to make it one and as far as I'm concerned there's nothing wrong with being gay, it's just the way some people happen to be and it shouldn't stop you doing something you really want.

I understand what your saying mate, *text deleted*... prob wouldn't be best to jump right in and inform everyone "im the only gay in the camp".:giggle: I'm not concerned about jokes etc, Ill just let that go over my head. Thanks for the advise.
 
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