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Becoming a Private Military Contractor after time in the RM

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by Trooper149, May 2, 2019.

  1. Trooper149

    Trooper149 New Member

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    Hows it going lads

    A question which I have been unable to find any information for, on the forum.

    What sort of currency will my experience in the RM hold, with regards to working as a PMC (Private Military Contractor/Mercenary) later on?

    Looking at it and going by what a few people have told me, if you want to work as a PMC and actually make a good earning from it, then you need to have had experience in "hostile environments". Love the term.

    Obviously the UK isn't at war at the moment and as such the prospects of a tour of duty coming round the corner is quite slim.

    With this said, how can one get experience in hostile environments?

    Obvious option would be to apply for Special Forces, do however long is reasonable and then transition to PMC.

    This said, the only thing that puts me on the back brakes with SF is my motivation. I am fundamentally keeping count of what I earn, what I get, etc. Some would say thats bad. I'd say your romantically deluded if you say you aren't motivated by anything except faithful service to queen and country. That said, I do believe in doing well by my own standards and the people around me. Not sure, if that is what SF is looking for.

    Either way, to round it off. If someone wanted to become a PMC, how can they get the necessary experience either through the military or without?

    Cheers

    P.S. I know PMC work is considered dangerous to some, I consider it as a differet way of operating compared to standard govt military, which might appear unusual to someone looking in on the outside.
     
  2. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    I notice that before today you have not been around for over two years. Is that because you went through RT, passed out and waiting to specialise?

    If not, then to get to where you wish, which appears similar to your posts from two years ago, you are looking at a potential minimum of 12 months from applying right now to passing out, a further 12 months or so as a GD, a ping if you're unlucky, which is another 2 years RTS and then applying for an SF briefing course and then SF training also with a RTS. So in all, a potential 7 to 8 years, if you're fortunate.

    I would caution against making your end goal public knowledge, especially on a open forum such as this, as I would imagine that those in positions that you aspire to, if you were to rock up stating that you are only doing this to get a civilian job sometime in the future, would be slightly miffed.

    For example, I can recall one recruit who openly stated that he only wanted to join the Corps so that he could have "former RMC" on his CV. People were not impressed.

    Alan
     
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  3. Trooper149

    Trooper149 New Member

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    Cheers

    I wouldn't say it's my end goal. More as a possible option, but I've yet to start the training to say for sure.

    I've DMed you.
     
  4. ex killick

    ex killick Ex-Matelot

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    Training first. It may not be for you. I was never a RMC, but even military training not be your ‘cup of tea’.

    Good luck though.
     
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  5. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Rather a case of ‘who do you know’ and perhaps more importantly ‘who knows you’!
    o_O:)
     
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  6. kirbymorgan17

    kirbymorgan17 New Member

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    i am afraid that if money is your driving goal you have failed at the first hurdle the commando has scant regard for the bank balance bigger fish to fry and all that as for the hostile environment you crave it cant be bought try it out sometime you may be pleasantly surprised all the best for your future
     
  7. Rob20

    Rob20 Royal Marines Commando

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    Yer fair one. Money shouldn't be the motivation, but we still have bills to pay and families to look after. Especially those of us who are slightly older.... It is a factor
     
  8. DutyWretch

    DutyWretch Royal Marines Commando

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    Fancied going that route myself, ex Bootneck, with a pretty ‘active’ frontline tour under my belt in Afghanistan (2008-2009) and a very flattering service testimonial upon discharge.


    What I found out upon leaving and researching ‘security contracting’;

    You need a lot of money for courses, I’m talking £10-15k

    Most companies will only consider you with two tours in some hell hole and minimum 5 years service
    (Minimum service is 4 1/2 years)

    The entire industry is a huge clique, as a far more knowledgeable and battle scarred member here has already mentioned, it’s who you blow, not what you know, type situation (I'm close friends with several former colleagues on the circuit, RM and even a couple of ‘them’)


    Like my current job (offshore energy) it’s very much a case of right time right place even if you satisfy the above prerequisites.

    If you were lucky enough to get onto a team, the learning curve is steep and any mistakes or errors on your behalf will see your employment almost immediately over, and your name ‘blacklisted’





    Just a few observations there.

    I did get the opportunity to join a well known Marsec company a few years ago, but a) I'm happy to never pick up a firearm again, b) my current field of employment is far more stable (oil prices withstanding)




    Private security is rarely as you perceive it from the outside. It’s not all running around like the protective hero to some sexy news correspondent, armed with a pair of oakleys, a beard, and a Colt C7.

    It’s often long and boring, and by all accounts a thankless task.

    I worked alongside some Olive Group lads in Lashkar Gah as a Marine, and they did some toe curling stuff, would often find themselves in the middle of nowhere looking after some district elder (who treated them like glorified servants) and, if the proverbial hits the revolving cooling device, private contractors are way down the priority list for military support asset assistance.


    It’s not impossible, obviously, and being a former RM certainly won’t hurt, but you won’t get through recruit training unless you want to be a Marine first and foremost, it’s designed (very well) to seperate those who do, from those who don’t.
     
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  9. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    So those that left the services to work in the North Sea were not interested in the bigger pay packet!o_O
    Some could earn more in one month diving then at least nine months in the service.
     
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  10. Trooper149

    Trooper149 New Member

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    So far, much appreciated for the responses guys. Plenty of help.

    Ofcourse, the first goal is RM and *text deleted*, I want to be an RM first before anything. I think as a way of life, you couldnt sign up for anything more solid, mixing with a load of people who are there to get things done and get things done to the best possible standard. Wish that was the case in alot of your average civvy jobs i've worked in like Personal Training, Hospitality, Sales and Management. Despite upholding myself to a high standard in all these endeavours, you are often entering at a very low income for all of these, and doing a good job is held in lower regard than who you blow.

    Obviously I am thinking what my prospects are in the longer term pursuit of the green dollar. Been looking at a few things which pay alright at entry level and with experience, tend to improve pretty quickly:
    -Gas Engineer
    -Commercial Diver
    -PMC
    -Electrician

    Be curious for any other specfic trades and job roles but I feel that when you enter an industry where there is alot more at stake than an average customers feelings, like *text deleted* going bang, then overall the industry seems to be alot more on point with pay, wages, perks, etc. Greater the risk, greater the reward.

    Any more information would be appreciated regarding either PMC or other trades/job roles post service.

    Cheers
    Tom
     
  11. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    A service career broadens horizons like no other. Opportunities that aren't even on the radar yet will crop up. Some might or might not be compatible with other life choices.
     
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  12. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Things tend to go in ‘phases’.

    First we had the North Sea, when good money could be made be it diving or other related areas.

    Then it was CP work where the ‘grey man’ was very much in demand.

    It was the Iraq and Afghan conflicts that saw the rise of the PMC. The demand being for former military to provide protection for various NGO’s. Being payed more than being in uniform but without the benefits. Yet working in the same hostile war zone! Not to mention ‘your’ company going broke then not getting payed.

    With the increase in piracy within the Horn of Africa many PMC’s reinvented themselves as Maritime Experts! Again initially the money was good, sitting on a ship watching the sea go by a safer option than being in Iraq or Afghan. Then PMC’s found it was cheaper to employ Third Country Nationals yet still charge shipping companies the full rate. Then again some companies fell by the wayside with ‘Directors’ doing a runner and people not getting paid.

    The more reputable PMC’s can still be found on the ground but ideally you need to know ‘someone’ to get an introduction.

    Another area that showed a growth was that of ‘training’. Companies offering training with the carrot of a job should you ‘pass’ their course. Well you finished their course and you may get one job with them! You may feel that having done ‘their’ course you could now get a job with another company? Well perhaps but you could find that you have to do ‘their’ training course first. So more money down the drain, for what!

    For a career in the more upmarket area of ‘Security Consultant’ then if looking at it from an ex military then perhaps an SF background would be a quality to cultivate.
    Medic?

    Then again as @Chelonian points out.....You never know what is around the corner!
     
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  13. BubbleBert

    BubbleBert New Member

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    Commercial diving is a joke at the moment!

    Very little offshore and rate of pay for inshore hasn't improved in 10+ years -roughly £155 a day, some companies won't even pay for digs or subs for food but still expect their pound of flesh from you.

    Been on many a site where the crane driver (who can't speak a word of English, you'll have to wake up whenever you want a lift and is in a nice warm & dry cab with his sandwiches) will be on a better date rate than the diver.

    Can't see things picking up anytime soon either!
     
  14. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    Bang on the button. Towards the end of my Civil Service career I specialised in Management Consultancy and after retirement started doing the odd bit of private consultancy work and was charging £150 per day; and that was many years ago. In conversation with my old boss I was told not to be so stupid and start charging a lot more, so I gradually up the rate and the last job was paying £550 per day, plus expenses and that was six years ago when I decided enough was enough and kicked it all into touch.

    Where you start out in life will not be where you end up!

    Alan
     
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  15. Former AE

    Former AE Royal Marines Commando

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    The basic CP work is still around but is over subscribed, Marsec is slowing down and blokes are having trouble renewing contracts. Still work in " Hostile Environments " but you need a lot of background and experience. A couple of my old oppos have now gone to South Africa working the anti poaching patrol training route, moneys not good but the work and landscape make up for it.
    Get a CGB before writing off your career and looking for something that may not be there.
     
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  16. kirbymorgan17

    kirbymorgan17 New Member

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    i have to agree with much that has been said on this topic.i worked as a saturation diver for eleven years in the north sea.i lived in saturation with two clearance/ships divers a royal engineer diver and a commando diver over those years to a man money was not the driving force it was the challenge it was the early eighties and it was pioneering work using different breathing gas mixtures diving helmets tools and equipment pushing the bounds.these lads had left the armed forces after having the absolute attitude instilled when they left the armed forces the fees were paid for them to further their career at that time it was ten thousand pounds to train for saturation i do not know if this scheme is still available to those leaving the service the hostile environment was all we were after.after deciding to leave the armed forces in my experience will stand you in good staid and all avenues will be open to you as the ethos of a commando all the best for your future in any life challenging decisions you may make nothing is insurmountable
     
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