Building to 3 X 3 mile runs a week

Mattys

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Did a number on my ankle last Saturday -banghead- rolled it running and heard a huge pop as I fell. Swollen and bruised, luckily the physio I've been seeing has been very helpful via email and has said to hold all current exercise/physio work for a week and then build up slowly. Would it be advisable to hold off for more than 2 weeks? I am just weary of losing progress with other fitness aspects (circuits etc) and losing out on other physio aspects.

Thanks all for the help so far.
‘Just one of those things that happen when training just getting unlucky and injured isn’t something you can prevent!
Where I run I’ve been lucky a fair few times as of late as there is tiny holes in the field everywhere so mini potholes if anything where ive just rolled my ankle but luckily in a way where I’ve been able to react quick enough to not hurt myself!

It depends how you feel in all honest you won’t lose much fitness at all in those 2 weeks and it can be a blessing in disguise really giving your body a nice recovery and not taking the risk on your ankle so 2 weeks rest could be good!
You could still do the bodyweight exercises and stuff?
 

JWR94

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Did a number on my ankle last Saturday -banghead- rolled it running and heard a huge pop as I fell. Swollen and bruised, luckily the physio I've been seeing has been very helpful via email and has said to hold all current exercise/physio work for a week and then build up slowly. Would it be advisable to hold off for more than 2 weeks? I am just weary of losing progress with other fitness aspects (circuits etc) and losing out on other physio aspects.

Thanks all for the help so far.

Sorry to hear that; I’d say best thing is to follow the advice from your physio; you could always get a second opinion from another physio if you’re not sure about it.

One thing I would say is that 2 weeks doesn’t sound that long, even though it seems it. You can’t do any harm in taking a bit of extra time off than is needed and instead working on mobility/strengthening work in the mean time, but you could actually do some harm by getting back into things too quickly and possibly making the injury worse.

I’m by no means an expert on stuff like this so always follow the advice from the professionals. Hope it gets better soon!
 

Chelonian

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Swollen and bruised, luckily the physio I've been seeing has been very helpful via email and has said to hold all current exercise/physio work for a week and then build up slowly.
I'm not a health professional so my comments are only based upon my own experience of a long list of injuries picked up over the years.

In normal circumstances I'd be guided by the physio's advice. But your injury has been assessed via email rather than by a hands-on examination for obvious reasons. Your fitness won't fall off a cliff if you avoid running for two weeks and then reassess.

It's important to remain active if you can: unless your physio recommended total rest you can maintain mobility by walking about your daily routine. Plenty of other training opportunities available: stretching and targeting core muscle groups, for example.
 

Corona

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‘Just one of those things that happen when training just getting unlucky and injured isn’t something you can prevent!
Where I run I’ve been lucky a fair few times as of late as there is tiny holes in the field everywhere so mini potholes if anything where ive just rolled my ankle but luckily in a way where I’ve been able to react quick enough to not hurt myself!

It depends how you feel in all honest you won’t lose much fitness at all in those 2 weeks and it can be a blessing in disguise really giving your body a nice recovery and not taking the risk on your ankle so 2 weeks rest could be good!
You could still do the bodyweight exercises and stuff?
Very true, thanks for showing the silver lining there. The problem with doing the bodyweight stuff is my warm up usually involves running/burpees/star jumps etc for 15 mins all which are quite heavy on the ankle, but I think I'll try and do a different warm up so I can keep doing the circuits.


Sorry to hear that; I’d say best thing is to follow the advice from your physio; you could always get a second opinion from another physio if you’re not sure about it.

One thing I would say is that 2 weeks doesn’t sound that long, even though it seems it. You can’t do any harm in taking a bit of extra time off than is needed and instead working on mobility/strengthening work in the mean time, but you could actually do some harm by getting back into things too quickly and possibly making the injury worse.

I’m by no means an expert on stuff like this so always follow the advice from the professionals. Hope it gets better soon!
Thanks, the physio did mention that in the next appointment she'd try and identify what weaknesses allowed this to happen and get strengthening it, so hopefully that'll help. Will definitely keep up the mobility work, thanks for the advice.



I'm not a health professional so my comments are only based upon my own experience of a long list of injuries picked up over the years.

In normal circumstances I'd be guided by the physio's advice. But your injury has been assessed via email rather than by a hands-on examination for obvious reasons. Your fitness won't fall off a cliff if you avoid running for two weeks and then reassess.

It's important to remain active if you can: unless your physio recommended total rest you can maintain mobility by walking about your daily routine. Plenty of other training opportunities available: stretching and targeting core muscle groups, for example.
Thanks for the running assurance, I was quite concerned as I don't want to be losing too much progress by resting to much. Luckily my job involves a lot of walking each day so I will be kept active there. I didn't think about doing purely core stuff, thanks a lot for the idea!

Thanks all
 

Corona

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I've had issues like shin splints/knee niggles in the past and what really helped me was to break my runs up into run-walk splits. By walking for periods of time during the run it helps your legs to recover a bit and actually spend more time running pain free, helping to build up some leg strength without causing pain/damage to your shins.

It's basically about exposing your legs to the stress of running for the longest duration without causing damage (or too much damage).

You said you can run 20mins without pain, so for instance you could start off with this split three times per-week:

Walk: 3 mins
Run: 5 mins
(x4)

You'd then add 10% to your running time each week so the following week would be:

Walk: 3 mins
Run: 5:30 mins
(x4)

Its seems agonisingly slow but it helped me to build up a foundation of running injury free, as I could never really do a couple of miles at a time before shin splints/niggles would flare up.

Also if you are looking to get a new pair of running shoes I'd recommend Asics. I got a pair a few months ago after reading recommendations on this forum and they're the best pair of running shoes I've had.
Finally got a new pair of running shoes, the state of my old trainers must've been bad as the store fitter was showing them to his colleagues o_O. Have done 2 20 minute (very slow ) runs this week and my shins seem to be ok with the pain, although painful at the start and finish the middle bit seems ok. Will get started on this on my next run, taking everything extra careful now. Thanks
 

JWR94

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@Corona Fair one, your shoes definitely play a part as well so hopefully that'll help. Aside from the run/walk splits the only other thing I'd recommend would be to foam-roll your legs before and after your runs, with particular emphasis on your calves to help with shin-splints. Good luck.
 
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