Calculate your Vo2max on a 1.5 mile run

Bellionaire679

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For all you number geeks out there.

If you dont know what a Vo2 max is then its the maximum amount your body can take in and process oxygen in a minute. Sport scientists use this mesurement in their lab tests and coaches can use a percentage of the Vo2 max as a training zone.

What does this mean to you? Not much to be honest. But you might be interested on how your body responds on a physiologial level as you prepare for the Royal Marines. And you can roughly predict what your bleep test score is if you cant do it at the moment.

Here's the formula to work out your Vo2 max

Vo2 max = 3.5 + (483/run time in minutes)

For example if my 1.5 mile run was 9.30 i would calculate

3.5 + (483/9.5) = 54.34

My Vo2 max would be 54.34 and using the table I can get a very rough estimate of my bleep test score



So according to the table my estimated bleep test score will be 12.2. Which matches the satisfactory scores for the PRMC on the Royal Navy site.

A couple things to consider is the results might not be 100% accurate as its an estimation and it also does not consider the first 12.30 run before the main one. As that can effect the results. However it was fairlyb accurate for me comparing my 1.5 mile and my bleep test score.

Obviously if you want to find your actual bleep test score then do the bleep test but for whatever reason you cant do it right know. I reckon this can be a good option to see what you could get.

Cheers
 

arny01

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For all you number geeks out there.

If you dont know what a Vo2 max is then its the maximum amount your body can take in and process oxygen in a minute. Sport scientists use this mesurement in their lab tests and coaches can use a percentage of the Vo2 max as a training zone.

What does this mean to you? Not much to be honest. But you might be interested on how your body responds on a physiologial level as you prepare for the Royal Marines. And you can roughly predict what your bleep test score is if you cant do it at the moment.

Here's the formula to work out your Vo2 max

Vo2 max = 3.5 + (483/run time in minutes)

For example if my 1.5 mile run was 9.30 i would calculate

3.5 + (483/9.5) = 54.34

My Vo2 max would be 54.34 and using the table I can get a very rough estimate of my bleep test score



So according to the table my estimated bleep test score will be 12.2. Which matches the satisfactory scores for the PRMC on the Royal Navy site.

A couple things to consider is the results might not be 100% accurate as its an estimation and it also does not consider the first 12.30 run before the main one. As that can effect the results. However it was fairlyb accurate for me comparing my 1.5 mile and my bleep test score.

Obviously if you want to find your actual bleep test score then do the bleep test but for whatever reason you cant do it right know. I reckon this can be a good option to see what you could get.

Cheers
Careful! It's a rough guide but by no means accurate. I tell lads aim for below 9 min Bft, that should in theory put you across the line for the bleep test. That's not to say it shouldn't be practiced however.
 

Bellionaire679

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Careful! It's a rough guide but by no means accurate. I tell lads aim for below 9 min Bft, that should in theory put you across the line for the bleep test. That's not to say it shouldn't be practiced however.
I agree. When I did it on myself I found there was a slight difference between the levels. I just thought its something cool to share as I was studying. Ill add a disclamer in bold now :)

EDIT: Maybe not as I cant edit the post anymore. If i post it here maybe a moderator can cut and paste it onto the original post.

This is not a bleep test score predictor. Only way to establish what your bleep test score is, is by doing the bleep test. The purpose of this is to see what your vo2 max is on a 1.5 mile run. With an anecdotal comparison between that and the bleep test results.
 
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arny01

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Bodyweight plays a big part too. Someone can have a very high VO2 max, but is on the big side. This will slow the running down. And vice versa.
 

JWJ

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I just did the calculator on my stats;

Last time I ran a bleep test was a few weeks ago and got a 12.4, although I'd have expected slightly higher but due to illness and slipping etc I did lose out - I felt I had more in me. My 1.5 time is around 9:10 which gives me a estimated VO2 of around 56.2 (which roughly 12.7-13.1 on the test).

I'd suggest the higher your estimated VO2 score the less accurate it'll be due to weight and other variations, although it is fairly accurate - I also did it for a close friend and it was within 4 shuttles of his last test result.

One thing this calculator will never be able to account for though, is mindset and prep on the day.
 

its_meg

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I haven't done a practice bleep test in what seems like forever but my estimated VO2 max would put me past level 13 and as much as I would like that...I feel that as I currently stand, that is unlikely :D
 

Caversham

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For all you number geeks out there.

If you dont know what a Vo2 max is then its the maximum amount your body can take in and process oxygen in a minute. Sport scientists use this mesurement in their lab tests and coaches can use a percentage of the Vo2 max as a training zone.

What does this mean to you? Not much to be honest. But you might be interested on how your body responds on a physiologial level as you prepare for the Royal Marines. And you can roughly predict what your bleep test score is if you cant do it at the moment.

Here's the formula to work out your Vo2 max

Vo2 max = 3.5 + (483/run time in minutes)

For example if my 1.5 mile run was 9.30 i would calculate

3.5 + (483/9.5) = 54.34

My Vo2 max would be 54.34 and using the table I can get a very rough estimate of my bleep test score



So according to the table my estimated bleep test score will be 12.2. Which matches the satisfactory scores for the PRMC on the Royal Navy site.

A couple things to consider is the results might not be 100% accurate as its an estimation and it also does not consider the first 12.30 run before the main one. As that can effect the results. However it was fairlyb accurate for me comparing my 1.5 mile and my bleep test score.

Obviously if you want to find your actual bleep test score then do the bleep test but for whatever reason you cant do it right know. I reckon this can be a good option to see what you could get.

Cheers
Interesting!

My version would be that every time I completed a session I would be blowing out of my arse and totally ballbagged. Over a period of time my times and scores would reduce as I became fitter, until I could exceed any required standard. But then I'm old school! :):):)

Good luck!

Alan
 

DynaMo

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Bodyweight plays a big part too. Someone can have a very high VO2 max, but is on the big side. This will slow the running down. And vice versa.
Not necessarily true, proper v02 max is measured in ml per kg meaning if you're lighter than me you've more oxygen per kilo meaning you've more oxygen available for your running, why being light apart from other obvious reasons makes you a Better runner
 

arny01

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Not necessarily true, proper v02 max is measured in ml per kg meaning if you're lighter than me you've more oxygen per kilo meaning you've more oxygen available for your running, why being light apart from other obvious reasons makes you a Better runner
My comment was made based on the testing method used by the Royal Marines at CTC. Which I'm lead to believe is a 20 meter bleep test. And not the "proper" method you seem to mention? :)
 

JWJ

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My comment was made based on the testing method used by the Royal Marines at CTC. Which I'm lead to believe is a 20 meter bleep test. And not the "proper" method you seem to mention? :)
The 20m Bleep test is used to estimate the rough ml/kg/minute of exercise (the proper way of measuring V02 max) but what you said is literally the same as what he said so I wouldn't worry about it
 

Caversham

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I'm sorry, but is it just me that finds a lot of this stuff a little bit too technical. The requirements of PRMC are well publicised, so everyone who pitches up there knows what is expected of them, which means that you are expected to go balls out over two days.

Nothing scientific about it and no analysing; just train for what is expected on those two days and as near as you can get to each day's activities. To me that means exceeding the specified times on the 1.5 mile return run, balls out on the bleep, same on the gym tests and then save some for the swimming test. Then repeat on day 2. Do all that and you'll pass.

Without sounding patronising, or even rude, try KISS. In short, Keep It Simple Stupid! Don't overthink things and train specific.

Good luck

Alan
 

Bellionaire679

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Not necessarily true, proper v02 max is measured in ml per kg meaning if you're lighter than me you've more oxygen per kilo meaning you've more oxygen available for your running, why being light apart from other obvious reasons makes you a Better runner

There are equations to measure VO2max that factor in body weight. This is to get more accurate results for male and females
 

Bellionaire679

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I'm sorry, but is it just me that finds a lot of this stuff a little bit too technical. The requirements of PRMC are well publicised, so everyone who pitches up there knows what is expected of them, which means that you are expected to go balls out over two days.

Nothing scientific about it and no analysing; just train for what is expected on those two days and as near as you can get to each day's activities. To me that means exceeding the specified times on the 1.5 mile return run, balls out on the bleep, same on the gym tests and then save some for the swimming test. Then repeat on day 2. Do all that and you'll pass.

Without sounding patronising, or even rude, try KISS. In short, Keep It Simple Stupid! Don't overthink things and train specific.

Good luck

Alan

I agree. Knowing what your VO2max is isn’t essential. I don’t track anything when I train. I know if I’m hanging out my ass when training I’m probably in the right training zones. I just thought it was an interesting thing to share
 

Wings

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Its weird I can pass p company pretty well but only get 1.5 mile at 9.10 giving it beans
 

Caversham

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Its weird I can pass p company pretty well but only get 1.5 mile at 9.10 giving it beans
Try it again a couple of weeks after P Coy. You'll smash any previous times.

Alan
 
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