Commando - On the front lines

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Ty

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Commando - On the Front Lines.

I was watching this show on youtube, and watching some of the guys that quit. The one had a real good point. He was talking along the lines of, I want to be my own person. I don't want to just be another soldier. I need to stick out and be myself, but when Im around a bunch of guys all going for the same thing, I feel to much like a robot. I don't feel unique.

Made me think, as I consider myself very unique as well, and I also, just don't want to be another solider in the eyes of society. Does anyone else think like this as well ?. Im not trying to get people to re-consider joining, but it really made me think. I don't like being stereotyped, and the thought of being just a soldier, makes me wonder if that really is fulfilling enough for me.

Any thoughts ?
 

Lshort1988

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I guess it depends where you want to be or what you personally want to achieve in life as its more important liking what you do and being proud of it than the fact that someone might view you as just another number im sure theres some very different personalities its just in training everyone has to be on the same level to pull through id imagine.
 

Ulick

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Well really all that matters is how you see yourself and how the men you serve with regard you, everything else is vainity, the guy in the programme didn't want his "uniqueness" taken away, well unless he invents a cure for cancer or is the first man on Mars, it's most likely he will always be an anonymous "drone" in society, at least if your a RM Commando, you are an elite, a brotherhood, if thats not too cheesy a term, you have earned something very few ever have or will, expereinced things most people in boring 9/5 cubicule jobs never will...and at the end of it all, you'll can look back and have the satisfaction of saying, "I regrete nothing"....how many people get to say that?

just my opinion of course
 

Ty

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Great response Ulick and Lshort1988. You totally put me back on track . :)
 

Shiloh79

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Hi TY,

whats not fulfilling about doing a job you've trained your ass of for & have made your sole ambition to achieve :D ... if thats not fullfiling in its own right im not sure what is mate, but then fulfillment is different to each person, thats the uniqueness off it all :wink: But what you can be sure off is that not many can or will ever achieve anything like what you do if your a RM commando!
If you're having doubts mate about being labelled a "just a soldier" then maybe you've got some thinking to do ... but remember being "just a soldier" is just a tag, a label that someone else has used to define you ... that's not who you really are mate, the only person who can label you is YOU! :wink:

Though this is only my opinion :D
 

matthewwookie

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I think the guy on the show was a little off target with what he said, did he expect you get options when you start your training. Granted, you are in a group of 50 men all doing the same/dressing the same etc but there are plenty of oppertunities along the way to seperate yourself from the others and stand out...phys/map reading/admin etc

Like the guy the officer described as 'moral in a box'. He was clearly his own person and not becoming a robot or clone.

Plus, after the 32 weeks of training, then you have got some real choices...what direction you want to head in, what skills you want to learn and the training to get there.

Just my opinion... :?


Matt
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Call me a cynic, but I've never yet met anyone who quits the service (RN or RM) under Premature Voluntary Release (PVR) that doesn't find somewhere to squarely lay the blame for their own failure. It's human nature not to accept responsibility, it seems.
 

GreyWing

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Ninja_Stoker said:
Call me a cynic, but I've never yet met anyone who quits the service (RN or RM) under Premature Voluntary Release (PVR) that doesn't find somewhere to squarely lay the blame for their own failure. It's human nature not to accept responsibility, it seems.
Too true Ninja, When I left Lympstone, there was about 6 others from my troop who went on the same day. 3 said they had problems with their knees, only one was med discharged, the other 2 PVR'd. One of the other ones was limping about all over the place for a week, until he was nearly late for the train and amazingly like a olympic athlete he was off. The others just looked at ourselves and had a little smile.
 

Ty

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Ninja_Stoker said:
Call me a cynic, but I've never yet met anyone who quits the service (RN or RM) under Premature Voluntary Release (PVR) that doesn't find somewhere to squarely lay the blame for their own failure. It's human nature not to accept responsibility, it seems.
I wouldn't go that far. Some really are not prepared for what they are up against. Military lifestyle is much different then home life, and some do not realize it. They just assume it's like gym class for 32 weeks straight, when there is so much more. I do agree they should wait out the trial period, and then leave, however some can be traumatized early on if they don't have the mental willpower.

Personally I think the age limit should be at least 20 to join up. I find below that age, a lot of people do not have enough life experience to make a life altering decesion such as joining the Army. I know some friends of mine that joined up young, and are now somewhat desensitized to life around them.

Just my opinion ;)
 

GreyWing

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Ty said:
Personally I think the age limit should be at least 20 to join up. I find below that age, a lot of people do not have enough life experience to make a life altering decision such as joining the Army. I know some friends of mine that joined up young, and are now somewhat desensitized to life around them.

Just my opinion ;)
To a degree you have a point there TY, I thought the same when I saw some of the young faces on TV soldiering in Iraq (those were of course over 18), and still do. Looking at some 16 year olds, it is too young. But when I was training there were a couple of 16 year olds that confirmed what I believed of 16 being too young, and also a lot that changed my mind. So basically I don't think you can rule them out just on age, I guess it's up to people like Ninja Stoker and the applicants parents to assess the individual, parents consent is still required up to 18.

But ultimately the armed forces are up against some bigger paying organisations. The Marines aren't too bad, but the army would not attract the numbers if they did not get them young. They'd stay in the private sector if they managed to get a job, and wouldn't take a pay cut. Those that didn't get a job, would most likely get a criminal record of some kind.

All I can say is it truly is about judging the individual!
 

ste preece

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Making the Grade or Not making the Grade

Ty: The guy you refer to do, in my opinion, isn't a team player. Working together as a team has everything to do with achieving objectives. Granted, we are all unique in life, that's why we come in all shapes and sizes and have our own looks and fingers prints. If we were robots we'd all be the same!

Basic Military training is about conditioning your mind set as well as your high level of physical fitness and ensuring you are taught the necessary skills to live, fight and survive in all kinds of dangerous and testing situations. You can't be taught one at a time to make you feel unique, that isn't logic is it. When the *text deleted* hits the fan, you're there for each other together as a team watching each others backs. Individualism in this situation would be dangerous. Civvy street is full of individuals and that's the best place for them.

As a Royal Marine, you aren’t just , "another soldier". You are an elite fighting soldier and you will stand out from the crowd. Even on home leave, talking about your experiences or competing against people, if you choose to do so. If you make the grade you will work and fight alongside some of the very best and toughest soldiers in the world.

People feel sorry for those who don't make the grade. Well, its tough. Its not meant to be easy is it. If people want to be just another soldier then maybe a career in the Army would be more suitable for them. Royal Marines stand out from the crowd. They're unique and their worldwide reputation precedes them.

I recall on a number of occasions during my service when we worked with various army ranks. I was very surprised at how much of a gap there was between us on the level of training and specialist skills we received compared to them. We were also of a different mindset. From us, everything got 100%, always.

The guy who wrapped in the beginning, was honest and sincere. He tried and admitted it wasn't for him. Then he wished everybody else all the vey best of luck. I admired that.

Regards

Steve :D
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Guys I'm locking this thread as we now have 3 running concurrently. All posts remain valid, however it is easier to manage one thread with comments about the actual program & one (the Announcement thread) dealing with concerns arising.
 
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