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Convincing Parents To Let Me Join

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by markymark, May 23, 2020.

  1. markymark

    markymark New Member

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    Jan 15, 2020
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    Hi all, just wanted to ask your thoughts about this

    I'm 16 at the moment and have been wanting to join for ages now. However, my parents are keen to let me go but not until I'm around 17.5-18 yrs old. They want me to do a college course in September and until June/July 2021. But the thing is though, most jobs look so mundane compared to the royal marines and military as a whole, and I'm probably just going to be bored and unmotivated if i had to delay joining for another year .

    What I want to do is join September this year and if it turns out to not be my thing then I'll leave, but if i like it I don't see any harm in completing training and getting green lid

    In addition, I started my app. on 26th march 2020, so if everything goes smoothly I should hopefully begin rt in around late sep./early oct.

    I will admit my fitness isn't great at the moment but i firmly believe i'll be up to standard by september

    Advice will be greatly appreciated thanks!
     
  2. ljw5

    ljw5 Member

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    Im 16 too and I was firm on joining this year aswell but after thinking about it more and getting advice on here I am not joining till I am 19. What I have been told is that you will want as many life experiences as possible before you join. Also, if you end up leaving the Marines you will be pleased you went to college and got qualifications. The longer you wait to join, the longer you have to get fitter and stronger which makes your chances of getting through RT muh better.
     
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  3. Amc123

    Amc123 New Member

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    I started my application at 16 and it took about a year for everything to go through. I'm now 17 and going into recruit training next month. I done a year of college and it was good so don't think college is all bad it's nothing like high school if you're thinking that. But at then end of the day if you're ready for it then tell them you think it's in your best interest and if they still disagree then it is what it is and you'll have more time to get fitter. Hope it all goes well.
     
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  4. Royal2010

    Royal2010 Commando Training Wing Instructor

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    Apr 2, 2008
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    My honest advice to all teenagers (especially 16-17 year olds) is to just hold off for a few years. Do a college course, get a job, experience life and train hard in between. You are in a vital stage of life where your body is still growing and RT is going to hammer you.
    The corps is not going anywhere so there is no rush to join up merely from impatience. We find on average that the younger lads struggle being away from home and with the load-carrying and maturity.
     
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  5. Private_Ryan

    Private_Ryan Member

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    Sep 27, 2018
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    I wanted to join at 17, but after my much deliberation from a serving family member, they told me to hold off a few years and get some life experiences, as said above, the corps not going anywhere .
     
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  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Totally concur with @Royal2010's advice.

    My guess is that in the years that lie ahead, due to political lobbiests bringing pressure from the 'Child Soldier' movements, that government will move the goalposts sooner or later on the recruitment of those under 18.

    At present, those under 18 can leave mainstream education if embarking on 'further education' or training schemes/apprenticeships in the workplace.

    It's appreciated that many 16/17 year-olds are more physically and mentally robust and mature than people who are much older. However, the risk of setbacks through injury and adjustment due to ongoing physiological and psychological development are significantly higher in this age group.

    Must admit, when I was 16 or 17, I felt the same and endured my parents being opposed to my joining the Armed Forces, which felt very unfair. Now that I'm a parent, I totally get it. Equally, for as long as the age parameters permit those under 18 to join, this issue will continue.
     
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  7. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

    Joined:
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    Years ago those aged under 17 could join as Juniors and on arrival were put into a Junior Squad/Troop and undertook a longer period of training than an adult Troop, (around 12 months). The pace was more gentle that mainstream RT, but they had to pass the criteria tests that adult recruits used to. They also had a different ration scale more suited to them than adults.

    If they attained 17 years of age and there was not enough to keep as a full Junior troop, they were placed in an adult troop to complete RT. We had around eight juniors join us when we left Deal to go to CTC. Their standard of fitness, kit husbandry, fieldcraft etc was streets ahead of us and they helped us out no end.

    My son in law and cousin were both former juniors and are extremely proud of their achievements and both served in the Falklands war in 1982. My son in law had his 18th birthday on the Canberra going south. I also believe that there were a couple of Paras that were killed down there who were only 17 at the time. A situation that is not allowed nowadays.

    Nowadays there is no such thing as Juniors. Those aged under 18 can still join, but they are treated exactly the same as the older guys and from what I hear and read, they struggle from homesickness, to being more prone to injury, but some of them do indeed complete training and pass out. In fact the son of @arny01 is one such young man, but he is the exception rather than the rule.

    Alan
     
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  8. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Rather than assuming that you will become bored and unmotivated get a grip and make college work for you. Don't drift and passively accept the path of least resistance.

    Focus on the career to which you aspire, research it and conduct yourself appropriately in everyday life.

    If you opt for college ensure that you acquire the basic literacy and numeracy qualifications. You don't need them in order to enlist but promotion prospects are limited without them.

    Many colleges participate in the Duke of Edinburgh Award or other Adventure Training programmes. These offer opportunities to get out in the field, to work as a team, develop leadership and build confidence.

    Consider a part-time job. It doesn't matter what the job is. The world of work will introduce a dose of reality and give you some financial independence.

    Consider pointing your parents in the direction this forum. It has a thriving Parents & Partners sub-forum community. They won't find any recruitment propaganda but honest, straightforward answers based upon the experience of other parents. Some of whom are parents to lads of your own age.

    Best of luck. Let us know how you get on. :)
     
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  9. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    From my own experience lads could enlist in Junior Parachute Company before their sixteenth birthday. JPC (also known as Hitler Youth Company) was based at Depot Para with the adult Recruits. Generally the semi-feral Juniors would join a Recruit Platoon sometime around their eighteenth birthday and about ten weeks into that Platoon's training schedule.

    The pace was definitely slower and even in the 1970s the duty of care was better than at my own secondary school. Additionally we weren't subjected to any routine violence from Staff which was also a feature of secondary school life back then.

    I can't remember why the Junior scheme was binned but it's likely to be for the reason that most of the civilised world regards 'child soldiers' as being dodgy, as referenced by @Ninja_Stoker
     
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  10. SA Ballie

    SA Ballie Active Member

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    I concur with what most people have said above - to wait a bit. As a parent of a 21 yo who is in RT currently, I share your parent's views. My son also wanted to join from age of 15 and due to various reasons only went in at 20. The work experience and life skills he learnt from school until he started RT has certainly assisted him in training, both physically and mentally.

    Good luck whatever route you take. Keep us posted, always nice to hear from all on their journey.
     
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  11. markymark

    markymark New Member

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    Thank you all for your advice :)
     
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  12. Mattys

    Mattys Veteran Contributor

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    It’s down to you what you wish to do and thinks best.
    Marines has always been a dream of mine since i was young.
    I really wish i had stuck with my application when I was 16 but instead went into well paid jobs and relationships and went down a completely different path and regret it everyday for not doing it sooner!
    There’s nothing wrong with doing a college course something like a sports course might be good for you and wouldn’t bore you or even an army prep course to get you a bit of military insight as I’ve had a few friends do it and they’ve really enjoyed it so you never know!.

    Whats your current fitness stats like bft/press/sit/pull-ups/bleep test?
    I wouldn’t just give yourself to September unless your stats are pretty good now as that’s only 3 months away and would put a lot of pressure on you if your not achieving them.
     
  13. Sniper11!

    Sniper11! Member

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    I was 21 when I went through basics (although im not a Royal) and it was hard enough then even with life experience behind me. The younger lads on my basics definitely struggled the most. I think you'll be in a stronger position if you keep your powder dry for a couple of years, just my opinion after witnessing 16 yr olds go through initial training. Increase the number of tools in your box through life experience over the next couple of years, that you can reach for during RT. It could be the difference between passing out or not.
     
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  14. Kangarooj

    Kangarooj Valuable Contributor

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    I wanted to apply when I was 16 but I was told to go to college, so I did and I trained through college. Then when I finished and I was 18 I applied but I had a medical issue (which has since been debunked, i never got far enough in the application to declare it either which saves me slightly) even though I was fit as a fiddle. I got a job and I'm now 21 and getting ready again having only recently learned the original issue was in fact not true, nor recorded.
    Now, at the ripe old age of 21 I genuinely feel more robust both mentally and physically than I did when I was 16, and to a lesser extent even when I was 18, I can feel that my body is different. The level of maturity between 16 and 18 is quite a large leap I realised, and will benefit you more than you would think. A lot of the people here give fantastic advice, and I would listen to them.
    As patronising as it may sound, but at 16 you're still very very young, you might not feel it and I know I've only got 5 years on you, but that 5 years in my experience has changed who I am drastically, and I feel at a much greater advantage now than I did back then.
    Sorry for droning on :D
     
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  15. browner467

    browner467 Valuable Contributor

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    I second the above, I wanted to join at 16 straight from school but was advised to go to college or gain a trade. I’m now 22 and a fully qualified electrician running my own sites. My desire to join the Royal Marines is still there and that is why I have now applied.

    I feel the maturity and life experiences I’ve gained over the last 7 years will help me massively compared to if I joined at 16.
     
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