Sponsored Ad

Dismiss Notice
For fuller site visibility and advert-free browsing, simply log-in or register.

Correcting or amending medical records

Discussion in 'Introductions & Welcome to the Royal Marines Site' started by Biggles, Nov 7, 2019 at 12:06 PM.

  1. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Hi everyone,

    I passed my recruit test on Tuesday. Thanks to this website and all the tips I was well prepared. Thank you @Ninja_Stoker in particular for your post on the tests. I actually bought one of the books you recommended and found it very helpful.

    I have my interview in 10 days time so preparing for that now.

    Ninja I have a question re medical. I have unfortunately a history of anxiety and some OCD however have been symptom free for quite some time. I am currently doing my pilots licence and recently flew solo for the first time. My question is what are the rules regarding this sort of thing? Is it a total no-no or may it be considered that I am well and fit but may need a longer time period before carrying on with training (I am 29).

    Do you think its worth talking to my careers advisor after my interview and explaining the situation to him and asking his advice etc?

    I am not particularly hopeful and have probably invested way too much too soon in becoming a marine. I have been training for some time and my scores are solid so physically have made a good start, however apprehensive that it may all be in vain...

    Thanks,
     
    • Like Like x 1
  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Posts:
    34,171
    Welcome to the site & thanks for the kind words.

    Again, I'm not qualified to give definitive medical advice, nor is your careers adviser unfortunately.

    I can quote what the Joint Service Publication (JSP950) states on the subjects (quoted below) but my advice in these areas is to see what the qualified medical examiner has to say on the subject, having first obtained your medical history related specifically to the subjects declared and submit the medical information in the same envelope as your completed Medical Questionnaire, prior to submission. In the event you are knocked back - ask under what circumstances you could in future meet the standards for entry.

     
  3. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Hi Ninja thanks for this.

    Do you mean I should obtain the relevant info from my GP and give that to my AFCO with the medical questionnaire?

    I saw my GP yesterday and she printed out my history in this area so I have this document.

    My AFCO said to bring the medical questionnaire along when I go for interview. So I guess he sends it off? I can take the document in then.

    Thanks Ninja
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Posts:
    34,171
    1. Yup.
    2. Yip.
     
  5. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Thanks Ninja, I'm actually going to see if I can get the diagnosis reversed as I was 'diagnosed' 10 years ago and I vehemently disagree that I suffer from OCD now or have done for many years. On the post you sent it says OCD is a bar so I guess if I can get medical proof that this no longer applies that may help.
     
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 1
  6. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Posts:
    574
    Hi @Biggles and welcome to the forum.

    Just to pick up on your last post my friend, there isn’t really a process to “reserve a diagnosis” per say. Of course mistakes are made but you will need much more than your opinion to challenge it. Patient records support clinical decision-making and continuity of care, as well as having an important medico-legal purpose in the event of a complaint or claim. A doctor may have written an opinion about you that you think is wrong. The NHS will usually not remove these opinions from your record.
    They need to keep this information because it shows why they made decisions about your care and treatment.

    It is unlikely that the NHS will delete or remove any information from your records unless it is factually incorrect.

    So, whilst previous diagnosis’ cannot be altered, they can be updated. Your doctor should make sure they reflect the circumstances, and be willing to comment accordingly if it goes to appeal.

    Best of luck and keep us posted!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 1
  7. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Hi Johnny,

    Thanks very much for your message.

    I think I am going to try and get the diagnosis 'updated' by getting a psychological assessment.

    The diagnosis was made in 2002 when I was 11. I am now 29. I completely understand the system and if that is the final ruling no exceptions fine - I accept it.

    However I do not feel that the diagnosis still applies in that I do not suffer from OCD anymore and have not done for the last 10 years or so!

    I realise that my opinion means nothing but I feel that the diagnosis 17 years ago is no longer representative of my current mental health.

    Therefore if I can be assessed by a psychiatrist and he finds the same - might that help?

    Thanks Johnny.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Posts:
    574
    Best of luck mate and just remember, no matter what happens, to always concentrate on how far you've come with your OCD, rather than how far you have left to go.

    Good effort.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 1
  9. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Thanks Johnny for your kind words. Will keep you posted.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Posts:
    34,171
    Correct, however it may have been the case at that moment in time, given the symptoms leading to the diagnosis.

    The difficult bit is proving that a diagnosis made many years ago must be incorrect if there is no current evidence to support it now, or indeed to refute it back then.

    The following is an extract lifted from GP Online, offering guidance to GPs:

    Amending medical records

    Patients should be able to report factual inaccuracies or question the content of the records but they do not have the right to alter their contents because they are upsetting or they disagree with them.

    In its FAQs for small healthcare organisations, the ICO notes that the right of rectification does not mean that doctors are required to remove their clinical opinions.

    It says: ‘It is often impossible to conclude with certainty…whether a patient is suffering from a particular condition. An initial diagnosis (or informed opinion) may prove to be incorrect after more extensive examination or further tests. Individuals may want the initial diagnosis to be deleted on the grounds that it was, or proved to be, inaccurate. However, if the patient’s records accurately reflect the doctor’s diagnosis at the time, the records are not inaccurate, because they accurately reflect a particular doctor’s opinion at a particular time. Moreover, the record of the doctor’s initial diagnosis may help those treating the patient later.’

    You should restrict processing personal data while you are verifying the record’s accuracy whether or not the patient has exercised his/her right to restrict processing.

    You cannot alter a record that is an accurate representation of the situation at the time the note was written, however you can make an additional note to record that the patient disagrees with the opinion.

    If a factual correction is necessary, such as a misspelt name or incorrect date of birth, it must be obvious who made the amendment and when (computerised records usually create an audit trail).

    Source: https://www.gponline.com/amending-medical-records-patients-rights/article/1462317
     
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 1
  11. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Thanks Ninja, I have spoke to my GP who agrees with me about my current mental state not being representative of the past diagnosis made over 10 years ago. Therefore I'm booked to see a psychiatrist for formal and assessment and hopefully then it can be updated to reflect current state.

    Will keep you posted, once again many thanks for your time and assistance.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. StrSam

    StrSam Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2019
    Posts:
    75
    App Stage:
    Passed PJFT
    Make sure you get the psychiatrist to write a letter stating that you're fine, so you can bring it to your medical personally. Saves them looking up extra information and might help speed up the process! The same if you have ever had asthma
     
  13. Biggles

    Biggles New Member

    Joined:
    Thursday
    Posts:
    21
    App Stage:
    Passed Recruiting Test
    Yes good point thanks Sam will do this.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Hopeful Greybeard

    Hopeful Greybeard Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2017
    Posts:
    57
    App Stage:
    TMU
    To throw my tuppence worth in on this subject (having a fair share of medical history issues and being a similar age) make sure you get every bit of evidence you possibly can in support of your position.

    Keep copies of everything, don't trust your GP or any other medical personnel to get things done quickly or to understand the importance of giving precise information, expect lots of "this is a sign of possible doubt in the original diagnosis that requires further investigation and referral to some other expert" due to nobody wanting to open the can of worms that can be misdiagnosis, especially in this culture of sueing for everything. Harass them constantly if you have to, you need it sorted more than they need to get it done and it can easily end up on someone's backburner.

    At this age (I'm 28) there is a far smaller window of opportunity to enter before that 32 years of age cut off point and delays due to medical history issues and changing status of diagnosis can be lengthy even if you do everything right. Trust me, I've been fighting that battle for 10 years and am only now looking to have passed my medical (waiting on a final review after my eye test is sent back, nod and a wink from the ME that with an updated eye test to replace my expired one I had the pass at last), things need to be chased up constantly and you need to always keep a record of everything you do to overturn or update any diagnosis so nothing gets "lost" or "forgotten".

    Beyond that, stay positive even if you get TMU or even PMU, make the appeal, crack on with your phys and don't let yourself get stuck in a rut or lose hope. Do all you can and run the race to the end. State of mind and all that.

    Good luck, hope it gets sorted for you quickly and maybe I'll see you at PRMC since we are at similar stages.
     
  15. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Posts:
    34,171
    Just to add, it's not wise to harass healthcare professionals incessantly. Their functional priority is primary healthcare, not occupational health.

    If you want your GP to help you get a job, be aware they can charge for it as it is not their functional remit.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 1