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Current affairs at the moment and opinions

Discussion in 'Current & Military Affairs Discussion Forum.' started by GreyTintin, May 22, 2017.

  1. DD

    DD Well-Known Member

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    Do you have any news article links?
     
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  2. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Yea there's quite a few mate, google it and you will see a few and can make your pick.

    Even the Dalai Lama came out and spoke against taking too many refugees, and about the islamification of Europe.
     
  3. JWJ

    JWJ Member

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    I've had a search and all I've been able to find is newspapers reporting on some sites taking his (Dalai Lama) comments out of context, and the only sites that have the view you said are abit dodge to say the least, only big one I found was Breitbart, which itself is quoting an Indian newspaper.

    I'm interested to see from a video or a more grounded source what he said. Don't take this as me doubting what you said just trying to see it myself.
     
  4. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/may/08/buddhist-extremists-anti-muslim-mandalay-ma-ba-tha
     
  5. JWJ

    JWJ Member

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    I ment just the comments of the Dalai Lama.

    Someone whos thinking logically and realistically can't argue with the opinions in the article you linked.

    One thing that stuck out to me -

    ' “Jihadi Muslims want to overwhelm the country, so we have to protect it,” says Eindaw Bar Tha '

    If that was said in the UK, there'd be an outcry, labelling the person as a white supremacist, fascist, racist, Islamophobic far right bigot.

    But how can you argue with that? Its true, there are Muslims who think their Jihad is to overwhelm our country, our culture and communities and replace them with their ideal vision. Theres such a massive difference from removing all people of a different faith or ethnicity, to protecting our communities, culture and traditions from extremists who's only focus in life is to destroy them.

    And much of the anti-Islamic rhetoric comes from our experiences with the Islamic communities in our country, how the pattern has been they become a majority in a concentrated area, and they are unable to live in a cohesive way with our pre-existing communities and traditions and co-exist.

    Walking around some of these neighbourhoods, you don't feel safe, you feel like you're not wanted in your own country. Often, though I'm not trying to generalise, these areas are dirty and unkept, like the people living there have no sense of duty to make their community a comfortable and clean place to live. The culture many adapt into is intimidating, it is not compatible with our own culture because they do not try to fit into it and live alongside non-Muslims in a cohesive way, and that leads to the problems we see.

    Have you ever walked through a Buddhist, Sikh or other highly concentrated minority area that has a vastly different culture and felt threatened? I haven't. Thats because they make a effort to understand that their culture is different but it is compatible to go alongside the cultures of the UK, but they have to try to be like that.

    One good example is the Gurkhas. Their culture, traditions and ways of life are so vastly different to our own here as a whole, but they have an open mind and find ways to retain their culture and everything that comes with it, whilst adapting to the culture in the UK. They invite people to experience their festivals and cultures, whilst partaking in our own. They're a great model for how different and often opposing cultures can be able to co-exist in a cohesive and beneficial way.

    One of the major reasons some Muslims feel that ethnic Westerners who follow Christian faith or Atheists, see Islam as a threat and thus see us as a threat, spreading hate and creating intimidating behaviours and preventing cohesion to develop, is to do with Military strikes in the Middle East, in those majority Muslim countries.

    They see it as us targeting Islam, not targeting extremism or terrorism because they are not a cohesive part of our greater community, to see those elements as a threat.

    When we see footage of a Drone strike in Iraq, we don't think that we're targeting Muslims, we see the targets as being Terrorists and Extremists. Because they do not mix, and cohesively live with us in a community, they see us targeting Muslims, this stems from and results in the "Us and Them" culture that we see today in many parts of the UK and Europe.

    Of course some areas have been able to produce a cohesive environment, and those areas are examples of how it could be, with many different faiths being able to coexist without tension. Although more needs to be done by the Muslim faith leaders to achieve this universally.
     
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  6. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Pigeons thought of the day:


    If these attacks aren't Islam, then how can criticism of Islam, or "islamaphobia" create terrorism?
     
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  7. thundernerd

    thundernerd Member

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    Another one to provoke thought ...

    When Donald Trump introduced his travel ban against mainly Muslim countries, we were all shocked and horrified in this country and myself included. We all dismissed it as a shocking display of racism. I still believe that a blanket ban is wrong because it's wrong to discriminate through race or religion, however; it would have stopped Abedi coming back from Libya into this country.

    When terrorists deliberately target young children, when do we say that enough is enough?

    I'm just keen to hear the thoughts of others. An interesting interview below with Phil Campion, ex SAS.
     
  8. cc1

    cc1 (former RM)

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  9. glos94

    glos94 Well-Known Member

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    Is it too late though?

    Will we continue to let this happen and respond by holding hands and saying the word solidarity 50,000,000 times a day? I'm starting to think that the western world has become so pussified that soon people will just accept it as part of life.

    If killing kids isn't enough for people to wake up what will it take?
     
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  10. thundernerd

    thundernerd Member

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  11. robbo09

    robbo09 Member

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    Correct me if I'm wrong but isn't it illegal in this country to support a terrorist organisation?
    Surely by having information, images etc on your phone, laptops and various other things like black flags is showing support of ISIS. I know of a certain place in Yorkshire where you will see dozens and dozens of cars with a black rag dangling from them in support of Islamic state, which baffles me! Why are these people allowed to roam our streets who are actively supporting terrorism against this very country!?
    If we did a Trump like ban it may well have stopped this individual coming back here BUT the disease is already in the system and it needs dealing with as it will happen again and again. Therefore I'd have to agree with Phil Campion's view, the only issue is where do we lock them all up? Scrapping human rights may solve that issue, but that won't happen.
     
  12. thundernerd

    thundernerd Member

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    Where in Yorkshire is that?! I live in Yorkshire so will have to have my guard up!
     
  13. robbo09

    robbo09 Member

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    Dewsbury/Bradford area.
     
  14. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    Bang on. I for one and beyond sick of hearing the same rhetoric. You just had to see Questions time lastnight to see them all wriggle out and fail to answer the questions amid a facade of "positive", "diverse", "multicultural" BULLSH!T.

    When that guy said "it's not 1930 anymore" I almost launched my TV through the window.

    Not to mention the guy who brought in the paper from the local mosque that had stuff in it that was inciting racial hatred and an attempt to brainwash people, and that stupid bint at the front piped up with her utter pish.
    Just because she chooses to ignore or genuinely didn't know, doesn't matter, it's happening, there's physical proof of it happening. And we need to stop it and the Muslim community should be held responsible for it.

    It's all talk and no action. It's a drawn out, sneaky, long game they are playing. And we are going to lose our identity, our freedoms and libertys, our culture and our children.

    And people wonder why right wing politics is on the rise in Europe, why brexit was voted, and why other countries want out? They are fed up.


    When 2 boys are arguing over which superhero is better, we deal with it, when one boy gets aggressive and resorts to violence, we aren't so tolerant and we step in and take measures to stop it. And to further prevent it.

    It's the same situation, because both arent real outside of story books.
     
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  15. OldmanL

    OldmanL Member

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    I was just going to post about this, i can't believe her denial over it, i get that its her mosque and she probably doesn't want to see it shown in a bad light or whatever but i feel as an outsider that the muslim community needs to see stuff such as that mans leaflet and oust it immediately. I can't see the guy making it up ( the leaflet he was given ), people need to stop playing ignorance to something that is very real.
     
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  16. Duff1996

    Duff1996 Member

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    Interviews like this frustrate me. Phil Campion, brilliant soldier I am sure, been through the wash of British foreign policy, but ultimately, he is filling time on Sky News. In that interview, he has made two outlandish claims to "send them back to where they have come from" and to "lock them up".

    This is an ex soldier's opinion, that bares no relevance whatsoever to the policy directives that would follow. I would argue that it is reasons like this that populism is growing, especially amongst a 'Facebook generation'. 'Oh an ex SAS soldier is right, he knows what to do, I agree'.

    Both claims are completely unfeasible for a variety of reasons. Sending them to where they have come from will increase their authority in radicalising more people, and therefore, we could see a bigger attack, with a greater number of casualties as they will have a greater insight into British culture and society. By sending them elsewhere, they only gain strength.

    Secondly, by locking people up, this turns the British judicial system on its head. They may be a risk, but by locking them up, they will become a bigger threat when they get out, or even by radicalising from the inside. There are no moral and legal grounds to suddenly let a small amount of people be subject to unfair, biased trials. If this were to happen, we become as bad as they are.

    A more concerted effort to change society structurally and legally, with a greater amount of education and development is what is required. For the short term, I agree with increasing security measures (greater surveillance to anyone with Jihadi links, and therefore a greater ability to prevent actions and attacks), but long term solutions that Campion points out are nonsense.

    I am not saying I have a solution, but that interview was completely enshrined with emotion and a lack of foresight. Let Whitehall do their job, balancing the complicated moral, political and economic factors associated with terrorism before inciting radical populism, which could incite disastrous consequences.
     
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  17. Duff1996

    Duff1996 Member

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    The black flag doesn't represent 'Islamic State' as an organisation. IS have just associated it with themselves. It represents Islam as a whole.

    It is like Hitler using the Swastika which was a symbol of peace under Hinduism.
     
  18. Duff1996

    Duff1996 Member

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    Surely by doing this, you will set up a dangerous moral precipice for further, unlawful and heinous crimes by both parties? Human rights are a fundamental cornerstone of state, society and warfare. As I mentioned earlier, do we match their barbaric nature and stoop to levels lower than theirs or adjust, tighten security, law and make fundamental developmental changes within society?
     
  19. wellmemedmyboy

    wellmemedmyboy Member

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    It is because we have made war an option not the final option. As Rand Paul says, we are tying our hands and fighting wars where our soldiers die and we don't win, and keep listening to foreign policy makers who have been wrong for the past 20 to 30 years.
    Terrorists laugh while using our liberties and tolerant systems of law against us.
    They ride the train of democracy until their stop like in Lebanon and Palestine. Israel is the canary in the coal mine and it shows us what our future may look like and that we may have to adopt more Israeli style approaches to security in my opinion.
     
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  20. robbo09

    robbo09 Member

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    Unfortunatley that is the danger, it's a double edged sword. By tightening security and changing the law will certainly help to an extent but it doesn't defeat it.