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Current affairs at the moment and opinions

Discussion in 'Current & Military Affairs Discussion Forum.' started by GreyTintin, May 22, 2017.

  1. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Hence the initial strap.

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  2. FuriousD

    FuriousD New Member

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    I think this woman speaks a lot of sense.

     
  3. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Yes, what amuses me is the number of MAC-10 users, particularly in the USA, who considered the strap to be a mere fashion accessory. So many piano playing careers cut short...
     
  4. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    But she avoided answering the question!-banghead-
     
  5. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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  6. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    Who were these brightest minds, name one, name one who was voted in to represent the views of the public. At the very best, you are admiring a system of un-elected people having supremacy over the democratically elected. All people like about it is that it's called the Human Rights Act so it must be something that gives Human's some rights.

    Which isn't logical, it's only called the Human Right's Act because that is these brightest minds as you call them came up with a name to stop it being questioned.

    Surely one of rights of a Human is for Human's to have democracy. Why hasn't anyone ever voted on the Human Right's Act itself? Bit odd isn't it!

    This is the point you are missing, I like Human's having rights - that's different from the Human Rights Act.

    You have less chance of that happening under Common Law than you ever would under a useless Human's Rights Act. Common Law puts people in prison, I can't remember the Human Rights Act ever putting someone in prison, it just hands out the odd mega fine - it's a cash machine for lawyers.

    Can't remember it being used in the Balkans or anywhere else that doesn't have oil or huge mineral deposits.
     
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  7. Duff1996

    Duff1996 Member

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    @GreyWing

    "Who were these brightest minds, name one, name one who was voted in to represent the views of the public. At the very best, you are admiring a system of un-elected people having supremacy over the democratically elected. All people like about it is that it's called the Human Rights Act so it must be something that gives Human's some rights.

    Which isn't logical, it's only called the Human Right's Act because that is these brightest minds as you call them came up with a name to stop it being questioned.

    Surely one of rights of a Human is for Human's to have democracy. Why hasn't anyone ever voted on the Human Right's Act itself? Bit odd isn't it!"

    Name One person who was democratically elected that helped form the Human rights act: Originally coined by the UN, granted, an undemocratic system, but nonetheless a conglomeration of people put in place by Democratically elected states, who we at the time, trusted with our best interests. Secondly, The 1998 Human rights act was an act of parliament that integrated Human rights law into British society. So parliament and democratically elected MPs passed it with a strong majority. No secrecy to hide their faces, you can find extra information online to back that up as well: https://www.theyworkforyou.com/.

    "This is the point you are missing, I like Human's having rights - that's different from the Human Rights Act."

    Point 2: Of course humans do have rights through various human rights acts around the World. In the UK alone there have been dozens of cases where the law has held up. Privacy, rights to land, rights to property, rights against unfair justice, rights to protect older people who are being abused in care homes, rights to ensure that disabled children are provided with transport to get to school, and rights to protect women from domestic violence. There are a various string of cases where under common law in the UK, Human rights have been put forward to protect citizens. More can be found on Amnesty international's website, an NGO with no state bias.


    "You have less chance of that happening under Common Law than you ever would under a useless Human's Rights Act. Common Law puts people in prison, I can't remember the Human Rights Act ever putting someone in prison, it just hands out the odd mega fine - it's a cash machine for lawyers."

    Point 3: The International Human rights act is integrated into common law, as shown in point one. Saddam Hussein? Not jailed, killed under the auspices of breaching Human rights.

    "Can't remember it being used in the Balkans or anywhere else that doesn't have oil or huge mineral deposits."


    Point 4: It was used in the Balkans to try Milosevic before his death as he was tried for genocide and also influenced the US decision to conduct airstrikes against Milosevic's troops. Granted, states can jump on the bandwagon but that is why we need to broaden the conversation of Human rights and allow NGOs to intervene more actively.

    Human rights laws are not perfect, nut I can't see why you would want to eradicate them. They are tried and tested for the bettering of states and the protection of peoples. It would be a huge step backward for the World and every state if these rights were to be abolished. They are integrated into levels of domestic, international and supranational government.


    Somehow, I think we will have to agree to disagree.
     
  8. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    As far as I am aware, Parliament only has the power to make Statutes, not law. Parliament can not take away laws either. Parliament does not have the power to override our laws.

    Whilst your Human Rights Act can be taken away by a new EU Government or a new UK Government etc - Common Laws can't. That's why you will have much more protection under Common Law than you will ever have under the Human Rights Act.

    You seem to be claiming that the breaching Human Right's Act carries a death penalty - something very very odd about your argument don't you think?

    I really don't think that the Human Rights Act is integrated into Common Law, that's not how it works. I've not seen any examples of it that I can recall anyway.

    I was only youngish when the war took place but I think it was almost all but over when we started bombing in support of Islamic terorrists - de ja vue. Either way, there were plenty of major incidents before that in which the west stood by and didn't intervene.

    There are a lot worse conflicts where the west haven't intervened, a lot worse human rights breaches and nobody was bothered to be fair, Rwanda for example.

    ----------

    I don't know the full story of the motivations behind the Human Rights Act, all I can say is that whatever it started out as it has now been abused to support the rights of criminals over decent people. It seems to have lost the consent of people, it will soon be gone and good riddance to it in my opinion.
     
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    Last edited: May 30, 2017
  9. DutyWretch

    DutyWretch Royal Marines Commando

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    Don't need the strap when you fire it one handed, canted over to the side gangsta style, out of a car window...
     
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  10. DutyWretch

    DutyWretch Royal Marines Commando

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    Al Nusra (I forget their current call sign) also use a black flag.
     
  11. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Not to mention......


     
  12. DutyWretch

    DutyWretch Royal Marines Commando

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    Yup.

    Plus I think Boko Harem use the isis standard.
     
  13. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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  14. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    All part of a bigger picture.

    Somalia: Puntland Coastguards Seize Boat with Illegal Arms from Yemen

    Sunday September 24, 2017 - 07:40:19 in Latest News by SomaliUpdate Staff Reporter


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    Puntland coastguards have seized a small fishing boat ferrying illegal arms from Yemen at the Bosasso shoreline.

    BOSASSO (Somali Update Online) — Somalia's Puntland coastguards have seized a small fishing boat ferrying illegal arms from Yemen at the Bosasso shoreline, senior security officer said.

    The boat carrying light and heavy machine guns, and ammunitions was captured about 3am local time on Saturday at approximate location of 17KM east of Bosasso, the Red Sea Seaport.

    "Our coastguards in their routine patrol saw the boat at 3am and captured it. After checking, we have seen a cache of arms onboard." Major General Mohamed Mohamud Hassan, of Puntland Coastguards said.

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    The security officials visited the seaport on Saturday morning and started investigating the owners of the arms and its destination.

    Among the arms seized were several PKMs, AK47s, ( rocket-propelled grenade) RPGs and ammunition boxes.

    Security sources told Somali Update Online that the assortment belong to arms dealer identified as Abdi Dhoof in Puntland.

    Major General Hassan did not say the name of this arms dealer but mentioned that local business entities might have involved in the importation of the illicit arms.

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    Capt. Ali Yasin, who led the team of coastguards in the Saturday operation said the boat had three people onboard without identifying their nationalities.

    "They are being held by the security forces for further interrogation." he added. "They gave crucial information about the assortment we caught with them."

    The officers are currently pursing other part of the assortment reportedly offloaded from the boat before it was seized by the coastguard.

    The war-torn Yemen has been the source of illicit transported to Somalia for the benefit of the terror groups of Al-Shabaab and ISIS in Puntland's Galgala mountains and in central Somalia regions.
     
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