Sponsored Ad

Dismiss Notice
For fuller site visibility and advert-free browsing, simply log-in or register.

Dealing with being in hunter long term.

Discussion in 'Common Training Injuries' started by stumpylegs, Feb 19, 2020.

  1. stumpylegs

    stumpylegs Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Posts:
    227
    App Stage:
    Passed PRMC
    Just want to hear any tips from lads who were in hunter for a long stretch and passed out, with dealing with the negative mentality and thoughts that enter into your mind whilst huntered, don’t know what hunter is like now but when I was in you got admin thrashed a lot (everyone was like f this sh*t) and towards the end of being medically discharged my mind was already out the door as hard as it is to admit.
    Any advice or tips for myself if I return to ctc or anyone currently in hunter would be appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2019
    Posts:
    1,011
    • Like Like x 2
  3. Royal2010

    Royal2010 Commando Training Wing Instructor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Posts:
    43
    I did about 15 weeks in Hunter when I was in training. Slightly different for me as I was week 28 of training so was chomping at the bit to get back into a troop and get out of CTCRM.

    It really is a test, especially with the social negative connotation that comes with being a Hunter nod/back troopers.

    Some of the Rcts I was in Hunter wanted absolutely nothing to do with getting trooped again and wanted to just earn a “free wage” which I found bizarre. Needless to say they didn’t pass out.

    On the flip side of the coin and with me being staff down here now, Hunter should not be a place of comfort to “wrap” and have it easy. It should be a place of rehab but also a place where you do not want to stay. There should be incentives put in place for Rcts to get out of Hunter and get re-trooped such as, constant working weekends, constant military knowledge testing and inspections. This would drive a Rct to not stay there and also at the same time set them up for success.
     
    • Like Like x 5
  4. Corona

    Corona Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Posts:
    215
    App Stage:
    Not Applied Yet
    Out of interest does anyone know what the longest time a person has been a recruit for at CTC? Or the longest time in hunter but still passed out?

    Purely curious.
     
  5. stumpylegs

    stumpylegs Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Posts:
    227
    App Stage:
    Passed PRMC
    This was the case when I was there, however since I was diagnosed with compartment syndrome, there wasn’t a “recovery date” i.e broken leg 8 months later- back in troop, there was nothing to aim for, spent 40weeks in hunter not knowing if I could be fixed or if I was going to try griz out the rest of RT, performing poorly.
    That played massively to my negative mindset not knowing.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. stumpylegs

    stumpylegs Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Posts:
    227
    App Stage:
    Passed PRMC
    I knew a lad that was around 3 years I think, he didn’t pass out, MBOS takes months.
     
  7. Rob20

    Rob20 Royal Marines Commando

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Posts:
    1,463
    I did 7 months in Hunter. Yer agree with all the above with regards to it being crap. But as Royal2010 said, in that tough environment, the ones who want it will put up with it, the mincers who are just there to big time being in the marines to their mates will eventually get gone.
    For me it was black and white, quit and never achieve what I set out to. Or stay and give myself a chance.

    Also a tip for training in general as well as hunter. Do not take thrashings or admin nightmares personally. Even the good lads will be included. The training team know who the good lads are. So keep your standards up and when you're locker gets emptied, laugh it off. And go again. Its just a locker. Lads who worry about the punishments just seem to self destruct over time. You can't control anything that happens to you, but you can control how you react to it!!
     
    • Like Like x 8
    • Gen Dit Gen Dit x 2
    • Nailed It Nailed It x 2
  8. Royal2010

    Royal2010 Commando Training Wing Instructor

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2008
    Posts:
    43
    I can totally imagine why. There should be a separate part of Hunter purely for serious injuries or to Partially MBOS but with a view to return to training once declared medically fit
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. stumpylegs

    stumpylegs Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Posts:
    227
    App Stage:
    Passed PRMC
    Tbf when I was in the lads who had passed every locker inspection and where squared away for many months weren’t normally inspected, I was one of these lads and the corporals just asked about my Mrs :D, because she lives not far from camp.
     
    • Hoofin Hoofin x 1
  10. Corona

    Corona Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Posts:
    215
    App Stage:
    Not Applied Yet

    With compartment syndrome is that one that is a definite medical discharge or does it depend upon how fast the case is healing?
    Thanks
     
  11. Rob20

    Rob20 Royal Marines Commando

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Posts:
    1,463
    Kelly Brook calendars was my method of distraction!!
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Hoofin Hoofin x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
  12. stumpylegs

    stumpylegs Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    May 12, 2017
    Posts:
    227
    App Stage:
    Passed PRMC
    It depends on your week of training, how severe you have it, some people can’t even run, for me it was just yomping, was painful and have to slow down after an hour ish of grizzing it out, was also told of lads who had the surgery that made one leg better and one worse (making him not be able to even run) making him get medically discharged.

    However I only knew of one lad in the 14 months I was at ctc who got back into troop with it, don’t think he passed out.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Corona

    Corona Valuable Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2018
    Posts:
    215
    App Stage:
    Not Applied Yet
    Thanks for the info, good luck with getting back there, I'm sure you'll be able to.
     
  14. Apex

    Apex Former RM Commando

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2020
    Posts:
    42
    Sadly injuries are always going to be a risk for recruits. It was the same in 1970. It’s all about damage control and taking the advise of the professionals around you. I was talking to my grandson recently about worrying. Worrying might be seen as a way of attempting to predict life so that there are no nasty surprises. Reality is in basic training worrying will not make anything more certain or predictable. If you come off the assault course and snap your femur then worrying won’t stop that!
    Loads of people join up, and realise that it is not for them. In my case I opted for the Royal Marine Commandos. I passed out of training with scars on my back due to the fighting order and stuff I carried in training. Plus I still have scars on my hands and legs because of the dreaded "Woodbury Rash"
    The Weals on my back have gone because they were caused by friction burns whilst running with 35lbs of fighting order and a large pack on me back in the seventies. Later in a Cdo Unit I used a Bergan which still created weals and suchlike when yomping for long periods with 90 odd kilos. It was an accepted part of life as a Royal Marine. Don’t fight it, grow from it.

    These days most former lads have problems with either their knees or their backs or worse as they get older. It is one of the perks of soldiering you get in later life. Ask any former bod who spent a lot of time carrying for want of a better term their home on their back for extended periods of thier life. Most I ever carried was in fact a ruck. One HF 316 radio, A Base plate for an 81 mm morter (was not HW so didn't know the weight) plus a tube of 4 rounds. My G1098 Webbing (roughly 30Lbs), An L42n rifle plus other bits and bats. It must have been at least 130Lbs. You must accept your body will be conditioned to life as a Commando.
    I defy any bloke over fifty who's served in the forces whilst having to lug stuff on their back to say that they are 100% fit. I'm a biff and get a War Pension due to my service in my Corps.
     
    • Like Like x 4