Debating between enlisting as Marine or Officer

whiteey

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Hi , I'm currently completing my A-levels and still struggling to decide between enlisting as a royal marine , a royal marine officer or an infantry officer in the army as I don't know how confident I am in my ability to pass the royal marine officers course. But I had a couple of questions so I thought I'd come on here none the less.
 

Caversham

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If you have a search in the POC section you will find that currently the Corps has more applicants than it needs and has closed applications for next year's batch. The earliest available is 2022, but that has over 500 applicants, so you can assume that they will only choose the best applicants out there.

Alan
 

whiteey

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If you have a search in the POC section you will find that currently the Corps has more applicants than it needs and has closed applications for next year's batch. The earliest available is 2022, but that has over 500 applicants, so you can assume that they will only choose the best applicants out there.

Alan

yep saw that , I'd probably take a year after my A-levels before I apply so I'd be aiming for around the 2023 course. Do all 500 of those get to turn up to the PoC to prove to their best or are potential people chosen on a first come first serve basis.
 

Caversham

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I'm not a CA, but the POC should be the least of your worries. Being "best" at POC does not mean you will be accepted for training. My understanding is that the hardest part of the process is the AIB and selection board, bearing in mind each Batch is only around 50.

With the current situation I would guess that a similar situation will be around for the next few years.

Good luck

Alan
 

smashlegs

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I'm not a CA, but the POC should be the least of your worries. Being "best" at POC does not mean you will be accepted for training. My understanding is that the hardest part of the process is the AIB and selection board, bearing in mind each Batch is only around 50.

With the current situation I would guess that a similar situation will be around for the next few years.

Good luck

Alan

I actually watched a video on YouTube of an old YO’s documentary out of curiosity. From what I saw, it’s an extremely selective system (which is should be) but there are things that are tested that you cannot really change, such as your personality and the many things that are within that or branch off of it. So an applicant could spend a year or two and make AIB and not actually have the right characteristics that a YO should have. I do believe you can transfer to OR though if it does fall through?

Hats off to the lads who have gone this route though, and those that have been successful.
 

Chelonian

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...but there are things that are tested that you cannot really change, such as your personality and the many things that are within that or branch off of it.

I'd argue that it is possible to change (develop) personality. Adjusting one's mindset is as feasible as adjusting one's physical fitness. Both require a mental commitment.
"Don't be yourself; choose yourself."

Attempts to project a bogus personality will certainly be detected though. From what little I know AIB is effectively a dissection of candidates' personas.

I do believe you can transfer to OR though if it does fall through?

I understand that this is possible during the application process. However, if selected and commissioned at the start of YO training one cannot revert to Other Rank if things don't work out.

In common with @Caversham I am not a Careers Adviser. I wasn't even a Royal Marine. But after rigorously researching and gripping a thorough understanding of the roles of Other Rank and Officer a candidate should be prepared to convincingly answer this question:

"What makes you think that you might have the qualities to become an efficient Officer in the Royal Marines?"
 

stumpylegs

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Or just do normal RT training, pass out then go and do officer training. Know a lad that has done that.........-banghead-
 

Caversham

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Or just do normal RT training, pass out then go and do officer training. Know a lad that has done that.........-banghead-
That is a very selective path to aim for. The Corps only takes two to three Corps Commissions from the ranks for each year's batch and sometimes none at all. You have to be really highly recommended for this path, so it's definitely not an easy option.

It is also possible for ORs to apply for a Senior Corps Commission, but you have to be a Corporal or above for this, and more like SNCO. You will also not be at the pointy end of things, more usually employed in an admin role.

Alan
 

whiteey

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Thanks for all the replies - after having a read of the replies here and some other material on the forums - I've decided being an officer isn't for me and I'll go for regular RT. Cheers for the help.
 

Ginger_BreadMan

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I'd argue that it is possible to change (develop) personality. Adjusting one's mindset is as feasible as adjusting one's physical fitness. Both require a mental commitment.
"Don't be yourself; choose yourself."

Attempts to project a bogus personality will certainly be detected though. From what little I know AIB is effectively a dissection of candidates' personas.



I understand that this is possible during the application process. However, if selected and commissioned at the start of YO training one cannot revert to Other Rank if things don't work out.

In common with @Caversham I am not a Careers Adviser. I wasn't even a Royal Marine. But after rigorously researching and gripping a thorough understanding of the roles of Other Rank and Officer a candidate should be prepared to convincingly answer this question:

"What makes you think that you might have the qualities to become an efficient Officer in the Royal Marines?"

Hi what would your advice be in order to not have a bogus personality but change your personality enough to fit the mould for Officer? What would you say are some of the best natural traits of a young Officer is?
 

Chelonian

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Hi what would your advice be in order to not have a bogus personality but change your personality enough to fit the mould for Officer?

I seldom offer 'advice' because everyone's circumstances are unique. But I will throw in some comments about what my personal approach to job seeking (any job) would be:

1. Research the job and the role exhaustively. Understand the fundamental difference (in this context) between the roles of Other Rank and Officer. One is not intrinsically 'better' than the other but a very clear understanding of the difference is arguably the most basic requirement.

2. Research the traits and qualities that the Royal Navy and Royal Marines consider firstly essential and secondly desirable in Officer candidates. Remember that they are not seeking the 'finished article' in a candidate but clear evidence of potential which can be shaped by training.

3. Once this information has been gathered think deeply and honestly about one's own existing personality traits and how they mesh with requirements. Ask trusted, credible associates (perhaps a college tutor) for their objective opinion about one's match or mismatch with the desired criteria for the job. Consider any feedback as objectively as possible.

4. Take steps to develop existing qualities and address deficits. For example:

A young (aged seventeen) candidate lacking in confidence might address the supposed deficit by devoting a year or two to exposing himself or herself to experiences which will enhance confidence.

Another example:
A vocally reserved candidate might develop confident communication skills in a college debating society.

Others may disagree but I don't buy into the notion of "the born leader" at all. If one dissects numerous examples of such individuals from history it often becomes apparent that their life circumstances shaped them rather than some divinely gifted talent.

What would you say are some of the best natural traits of a young Officer is?

Hopefully others will chip in with their views on this. But as an aside, a young acquaintance of mine who is considering a service career had a part-time job in the hospitality sector while at college. On one occasion he served drinks at a tri-service function attended by very senior Officers and NCOs. He took the opportunity to ask as many as possible what they considered to be the single most important trait an Officer should possess. Overwhelmingly the two most common answers were 'Judgment' and 'Integrity'.
 

R

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Thanks for all the replies - after having a read of the replies here and some other material on the forums - I've decided being an officer isn't for me and I'll go for regular RT. Cheers for the help.

So based on what you have read on the forum? What seems to challenging to attempt the Commissioned route? -banghead- Could you expand alittle on your reasoning because that seems pretty weak!
 

Ninja_Stoker

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To be honest, I often feel that I'm "Officer Bashing" whenever this topic is raised. I'm genuinely not.

RM Officers are amongst the best I've worked with and served under. It's difficult to generalise but a common theme is they tend to be good at making decisions, no-nonsense, quick-witted and willing to accept responsibility for their actions and those under their charge to whom they are loyal. In short, they get the job done, work hard, play hard. Doubtless there are exceptions, but this is my experience.

Often it's said that someone aiming to be an Officer should join as one as it's the only assured route. Equally, a person level-headed enough to at least consider joining as an Other Rank demonstrates they hold Other Ranks in high regard, as perhaps opposed to those who 'know' they are destined to be an Officer in the Armed Forces, no matter the cap badge.

The practicalities of the job and the career path are quite different to the other rank route. But, no job is perfect and each has different downsides depending on the priorities and aspirations of the individual considering a commission.

Just to add, those who imagine an entire 20 year career will be spent at the sharp end, emulating a gory Call of Duty gaming session is unlikely to have their aspirations fulfilled.
 
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