Digging Deep

ste preece

Former RM
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Posts
1,476
Reaction score
469
Last nights circuit training session was an absolute killer of a session. The varying types of pressups were relentless and I had to dig deep to keep going at a good rate. When the pain kicked in and the exercises needed more effort to maintain the momentum I started with, I drifted my mind back to the assault course at CTCRM during my basic training. The air was tight inside the gym and I had to fight hard to get more oxygen into my lungs. During some of the pressups I looked around and suddenly realised that my pressups were different to everybody elses. Their heads were hanging down, yet I was touching the floor with my chin. (yes, I know bootneck pressups!!)

I was watching people drop to their knees on the floor one by one, yet mentally in my mind I was running like mad across the assault course and digging deep to sprint up the hill towards the last fence, before turning right towards the last obstacle. Suddenly everything stopped and I finished the last pressup. Pools of sweat were dripping off my face and onto the floor, forming a pool.

"Bloody hell Steve, how the hell did you manage to keep that up." Said the instructor. "Even my knees hit the floor before the end of the circuit." "The air is so tight in here I could hardly breath."

"I just had to dig deeper." I told him.

Undoubtedly during your basic training you will have to dig deep, deeper and the even deeper again on many occasions. When this is required try and remember, its only pain, and there's always more energy in reserve even when your mind wants to ease it up.

Cheers

Steve
 

Qwerty123

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
May 29, 2008
Posts
1,491
Reaction score
4
Cheers Steve, good post..

I recognize that it IS only pain, a chemical sensation, and your mind CAN be in control of your body so that it doesn't stop when it feels it, but I am finding that developing this mental strength to keep going when your arms and legs are screaming at you to stop is proving difficult!
 

ste preece

Former RM
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Posts
1,476
Reaction score
469
Nothings Impossible

Briggfoot: I know where you are coming from. However, I do recall a a stage in basic training where, instead of focusing on the physical pain during a fizz session, I was able to switch off and ignore it. I'm sure it comes to all those who go through the pain barrier at some point. Very probably this is part of the mental attitude when boot necks keep going when everybody else has given up.

Prince Philip once said:

"Guard these Colours well and remember that, whatever the problem, a Royal Marine Commando is always expected to achieve the impossible."


Cheers

Steve
 

Stacka

Army Commando
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Posts
1,083
Reaction score
2
Last nights circuit training session was an absolute killer of a session. The varying types of pressups were relentless and I had to dig deep to keep going at a good rate. When the pain kicked in and the exercises needed more effort to maintain the momentum I started with, I drifted my mind back to the assault course at CTCRM during my basic training. The air was tight inside the gym and I had to fight hard to get more oxygen into my lungs. During some of the pressups I looked around and suddenly realised that my pressups were different to everybody elses. Their heads were hanging down, yet I was touching the floor with my chin. (yes, I know bootneck pressups!!)

I was watching people drop to their knees on the floor one by one, yet mentally in my mind I was running like mad across the assault course and digging deep to sprint up the hill towards the last fence, before turning right towards the last obstacle. Suddenly everything stopped and I finished the last pressup. Pools of sweat were dripping off my face and onto the floor, forming a pool.

"Bloody hell Steve, how the hell did you manage to keep that up." Said the instructor. "Even my knees hit the floor before the end of the circuit." "The air is so tight in here I could hardly breath."

"I just had to dig deeper." I told him.

Undoubtedly during your basic training you will have to dig deep, deeper and the even deeper again on many occasions. When this is required try and remember, its only pain, and there's always more energy in reserve even when your mind wants to ease it up.

Cheers

Steve
Havent we heard this thread before ste?
 

Seedytucker

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Posts
1,119
Reaction score
1
you might have stacka but then you seem to be dragging your application out a bit ;)
i haven't read it before and it's a usefull post.
 

Stacka

Army Commando
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Posts
1,083
Reaction score
2
you might have stacka but then you seem to be dragging your application out a bit ;)
i haven't read it before and it's a usefull post.
Na i failed prmc *text deleted**text deleted* face, but im not the type to just roll over and give in.....so im waiting till October.
 

R. M. Pitt

Veteran Contributor
Joined
May 20, 2008
Posts
531
Reaction score
0
Last nights circuit training session was an absolute killer of a session. The varying types of pressups were relentless and I had to dig deep to keep going at a good rate. When the pain kicked in and the exercises needed more effort to maintain the momentum I started with, I drifted my mind back to the assault course at CTCRM during my basic training. The air was tight inside the gym and I had to fight hard to get more oxygen into my lungs. During some of the pressups I looked around and suddenly realised that my pressups were different to everybody elses. Their heads were hanging down, yet I was touching the floor with my chin. (yes, I know bootneck pressups!!)

I was watching people drop to their knees on the floor one by one, yet mentally in my mind I was running like mad across the assault course and digging deep to sprint up the hill towards the last fence, before turning right towards the last obstacle. Suddenly everything stopped and I finished the last pressup. Pools of sweat were dripping off my face and onto the floor, forming a pool.

"Bloody hell Steve, how the hell did you manage to keep that up." Said the instructor. "Even my knees hit the floor before the end of the circuit." "The air is so tight in here I could hardly breath."

"I just had to dig deeper." I told him.

Undoubtedly during your basic training you will have to dig deep, deeper and the even deeper again on many occasions. When this is required try and remember, its only pain, and there's always more energy in reserve even when your mind wants to ease it up.

Cheers

Steve
Good post cheers :applaus:
 

Seedytucker

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Posts
1,119
Reaction score
1
Na i failed prmc *text deleted**text deleted* face, but im not the type to just roll over and give in.....so im waiting till October.
*text deleted* fair play. well we may well be on the same PRMC. good luck with it.
 

Sam1

Royal Marines Commando - Moderator
Joined
Apr 30, 2008
Posts
1,632
Reaction score
740
Stacka, wat did u fail on??? and with the running, is it 1.5mile in a squad in under 10:30 minutes, and then run back best effort before 21:30 minutes??

cheers. (Y)

:rock:
 

Stacka

Army Commando
Joined
Mar 2, 2008
Posts
1,083
Reaction score
2
Stacka, wat did u fail on??? and with the running, is it 1.5mile in a squad in under 10:30 minutes, and then run back best effort before 21:30 minutes??

cheers. (Y)

:rock:
Failed on pull ups of all things, the bar you do it in is so so slippey, so with my heavy ass and sweat i slipped off when i got to about 2-3, that was it....game over.

The running is a troop.....its dead easy, dont know what the time is but its piss easy. Then the run back is best effort.....but its impossible to get a good time becasue there is loads of other people at the start fighting to get away.
 

FletchPRMC

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Posts
502
Reaction score
0
I persoanlly didnt find the bar too slippy (when I got to 6 my hands were starting to slide down), so guess it varies between PRMC's.We did have a PTI wiping it after every few people.
 

RC

Active Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Posts
561
Reaction score
0
Stacka .... How many pull-ups could you do before your PRMC on a normal bar ?

Rich.
 

Touchstone

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Apr 23, 2008
Posts
656
Reaction score
1
Some good advice there Steve. Though I have yet to find this mental store that I can tap into. I guess you have to have got through certain pain barriers to obtain.

Although once on a run as soon as I started my legs where killing but I just kept pushing myself on and by the end I was *text deleted**text deleted*ing nackered, and safe to say that my breakfast came up and my legs where screwed for the rest of the day. But whenever I feel I am tired and starting to flag I keep repeating the word in Royal Marine in my head...sounds cheesy but it motivates.

Basically I think to myself "You want be in the *text deleted**text deleted*ing Royal Marines? Push harder" if you know what I mean. :wondering:
 

FletchPRMC

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Posts
502
Reaction score
0
Basically I think to myself "You want be in the *text deleted**text deleted*ing Royal Marines? Push harder" if you know what I mean. :wondering:

I often repeat in my head "It depends how much you want it"


OR "its the eye of the tiger....."
hahah
 

ste preece

Former RM
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Posts
1,476
Reaction score
469
Yes it would appear I mentioned this back in March, but I did say that when I need to dig deeper I look back at those times. Well, this week, a new mega circuit was introduced, meaning that once again I needed to dig deeper. So, just like I said, I drifted back to my basic training and used the hard physical challenges from back then as something to draw on when I needed to push myself that much more to achieve the objective.

Looks like I'm true to my word guys. Because that's what the reference to the previous thread in March actually shows. Consequently, if I mention this time and time again it literally means that I'm adopting my proven technique that works for me when I need it.

I hope you too will also be able to draw on times like this when you need more energy, grit and determination to drive on relentlessley, when you're being pushed to your limits. It really does work for me.

All the very best

Steve
 
Top