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Education experience in the RM

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by DwightSchrute, Apr 18, 2019.

  1. Sly3

    Sly3 Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2014
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    I am partial to cider on a very hot summers evening, I can see myself being distracted.

    Glad I’m rejoining in my mid twenties, I have the time, but I do hope the higher’s above me allow me to get on with the education within my own time.
     
  2. blindman3004

    blindman3004 Member

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    Its quite hard to say. A degree with a good classification i.e. 1st or 2:1 is useful in its own right and could see yourself getting on to some good grad schemes. I think it really boils down to the individuals circumstance, their goals and network. If you are thinking of studying I would look at your

    A) current and previous work experience
    B) current academic qualifications and qualification/courses gained through work

    then match this against your future career ambitions and see how well this pairs up. Will a degree add any value? The aim is to make yourself as employable as possible. It might be that the job/Sector you would like to do/work does not require a degree or it would be better for you invest your time on a difference course or getting work exp. E.g. if you wanted to get into Project Management, I would not recommend for you to spend 6 years getting a degree and instead enrol onto a PRINCE or AGILE course and get some coordination experience. Again same with Sales/Account Management and also IT. 3 of these have a very high potential salary and do not require a degree to get there.

    Some sectors like Law/Teaching it would be the norm to have a degree. If the job you are looking to do is quite competitive there is a chance that there would be a degree requirement (big generalization), employers can do this because they have a such a high amount of applicants they can afford to be particular who they choose. Especially if its a highly sought after entry level job where the applicant is not likely to have a much work experience.

    @Chelonian has got some great thoughts which I agree with.

    I would type in future jobs you are interested in doing after the Marines and look at the current job requirements and then decide how beneficial having a degree will be.

    Do you have any thoughts of what you would like to do after the Marines?
     
  3. Jack of no trades

    Jack of no trades Royal Marines Commando

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    Half of this is factual, the other half is pure crap
     
  4. ave!

    ave! Royal Marines Commando

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    @Jack of no trades , that 50% accuracy rate is better than talking crap all the time..
     
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  5. Jack of no trades

    Jack of no trades Royal Marines Commando

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    Not really when you consider guys that are asking are aspiring to join and asking for information, and get told by "experienced" lads that "the hierarchy don't have education so don't want the lads to have it", and that if they find out they are doing a degree that they will be made too busy to do it, etc, etc. which is all full blown bollocks.

    Additionally, why would you be given time during work time to do a degree that you wanted to do? baring in mind that even in civi street there are jobs that require annual mandatory training that must be done in your own time, imagine then thinning out to crack some degree work!
     
  6. R

    R Well-Known Member

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    Part of aspiring to join an organisation is having realistic insight into what your joining, and how the members of the organisation conduct themselves.

    I completed a degree in the corp, and as stated in a previous post my hierarchy when I started my studies were completely supportive. However when my unit changed with draft, as it does for most at the 2 year point my new hierarchy made my 2 days or so a month requirement of physical lecturers as difficult as possible to attend, and I was required to work those days in additional duties. I vividly remember by line manager, as I don't want to mention rank, stating he didn't give a f$%k if its corp funded study, as "...I was on a new draft and they hadn't signed off on it." I know ranks, several from my study group, across the O/R rank range who like me had their success in corp funded studies hindered through disagreement with their hierarchy and man management.

    Yes these opportunities are publicly supported and promoted by the Navy, and I found the education officers within the RN very helpful in identifying the JSP's, part funding contributions, opportunities, and other matters of red tape. I had alot of support to get approval as the particular degree I wished to complete though "open to all ranks" on the DIN, was actually on investigation "only open to commissioned ranks, preferably second tour captains."

    I have helped several other ranks within the corp also get into further education, which at times has put me at odds with their command, and their agendas. So i know exactly where @ave! is coming from with his statements.

    In a simple sentence "...benefit of the service." If you are able to demonstrate the study/course etc you wish to attend will improve your capacity to the RM then that individual should be supported. I have a corporate background before I joined and I soon leave to rejoin that environment, professional development is encouraged and time/funds are committed by civilian employers.

    Imagine a civilian organisation sending employees on adventure training and team building. Oh they do!

    Great bit of constructive criticism, if you have a counter argument to a post(s) I would be keen to read the expanded answer. Preferable to curt remarks disparaging other forum member(s) contributions, which I'm increasingly beginning to think comes from an exceptionally limited perspective.
     
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  7. Jack of no trades

    Jack of no trades Royal Marines Commando

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    First point was more about the "CoC don't have education so don't like the lads to have it" attitude.

    Second point, AT for team building vs "I want to do a degree, give me time off for it"

    Third point, fair one, I was a bit of a dick there. It's since been talked about elsewhere
     
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  8. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    No arguments from this call sign! :D

    Alan
     
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