Establishing a basic level of fitness

GHO5T

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So at this point in time im focusing on getting a basic level of fitness which i can then build on by adding in more complex things like intervals, fartleck etc so just wondering the best way to go about getting 'basic fitness'

Im currently thinking along the lines of;
Mon- Run
Tue- Circuit (pressups, situps, pullups)
Wed- Run
Thu- Circuit (same as Tue)
Fri- Run
Sat- Circuit (as above)
Sun- Rest

For the runs i was thinking of day 1 doing a 3 miller for a time to compare to and then re-test it every 6 weeks. then when i can 'comfortably' run a fast 3 miller i'd build the distances up so i was doing maybe 2 5-millers and a 3 a week. when this becomes comfortable id add in 1 hill/sprinting session a week.

For the circuits i was thinking of just doing them in sets of 3 going straight through eg. 20 pressups, 20 situps, 4 pullups then rest for a minute before starting again.

I know theres alot of people who know what their talking about so just looking for advice/suggestions as to wether this should be enough?

Cheers lads.
 
S

stokey_14

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That looks spot on to me. Simple and get the job done. To many people rush into the tough stuff with out building up there GPP (general physical preparedness) and work capacity (the ability to do and recover from work)

I think I echo the thoughts of many lads on here when I say look into Mobility and ?pre-hab? exercises along with foam rolling.

Get into good habits from the off. What this stuff entails is just 10-20 minute work each day and can lead to a huge reduction in risk of injury, improved Range of motion, improved recovery etc

Perhaps one thing I might change about your plan is rather than working 6 days on 1 day off why not start with 3 days on 1 day off still alternate circuits and running but also get a tad more rest in there.

As a beginner its important to understand rest is where you grow and improve and for the first few months at least I think it?d be better to work towards a 6 day a week schedule rather than jump straight into it.

Increased recovery will allow you to work harder. Quality over quantity.

Stokey


P.S. maybe get a range wider range of basic body weight movements in your circuit also. Squats, lunges and the dreaded burpees would be a good place to start.

These will help strength, flexibility, endurance, co-ordination, cardiovascular fitness etc with out being overly tough or complex.
 

Luke0212

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Im currently thinking along the lines of;
Mon- Run
Tue- Circuit (pressups, situps, pullups)
Wed- Run
Thu- Circuit (same as Tue)
Fri- Run
Sat- Circuit (as above)
Sun- Rest
It's great to see a simple but effective routine on here and I might just steal it myself. I'm a sucker for throwing myself in at the deep end and suffering 3 weeks later after too high volume/little recovery.

I teach an indoor spinning class twice a week and do some MMA sparring with a mate here and there but otherwise am definitely going to take it back to basics for a while, great post.
 

Naylor

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30 minute run sessions, 3 times a week for a month. Don't concentrate on distance so much, the distance will naturally increase as you become a stronger runner. Hit those three run consistently for the month and you should make a noticeable increase in fitness. Building the base level of fitness and getting the miles on the legs before you attempt sprints and best effort running sessions is important to prevent injury.
 

GHO5T

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What exactly do you mean by mobility and pre-hab exercises stokey? could you give me some examples please.

also i think i'll take your advice about less days work too, i'll set it up like; Week 1- Run-Circuit-Run
Week 2- Circuit-Run-Circuit and then once i feel its needed i'll go 2-2, then 3-2 and eventually 3-3

Luke, yeah i agree about 'going in at the deep end' the way i see it your better off easing into a programme and it lasting an extra 3 weeks than just getting stuck in about it and injuring yourself which would just set you back..

Also how often should i be testing my times/max reps? every 4 weeks? 6?

And lastly, its the Paras im going for and i know that any pullups i do through the process will be underhand/chinups so should i stick to doing those in my circuits even though overhand are harder and more beneficial?
 

westy

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What exactly do you mean by mobility and pre-hab exercises stokey? could you give me some examples please.

also i think i'll take your advice about less days work too, i'll set it up like; Week 1- Run-Circuit-Run
Week 2- Circuit-Run-Circuit and then once i feel its needed i'll go 2-2, then 3-2 and eventually 3-3

Luke, yeah i agree about 'going in at the deep end' the way i see it your better off easing into a programme and it lasting an extra 3 weeks than just getting stuck in about it and injuring yourself which would just set you back..

Also how often should i be testing my times/max reps? every 4 weeks? 6?

And lastly, its the Paras im going for and i know that any pullups i do through the process will be underhand/chinups so should i stick to doing those in my circuits even though overhand are harder and more beneficial?
Do a combination of heaves and pull ups. The Paras can also send you a 6 week pre ADSC programme. Phone them on the number on the Army website.

www.army.mod.uk/para

Best of luck
 

GHO5T

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Do a combination of heaves and pull ups. The Paras can also send you a 6 week pre ADSC programme. Phone them on the number on the Army website.

www.army.mod.uk/para

Best of luck
Just managed to find the programme online and it looks perfect, after a month or 2 building up fitness i'll get in about that as it looks perfect and progressive. thanks very much.
 

JMC

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What exactly do you mean by mobility and pre-hab exercises stokey? could you give me some examples please.
I know you asked Stokey but I wanted to add a bit.

Pre-hab is designed to prevent injury. It builds strength in core (not just core as in abs) muscles and tendons that give you stability.

These include: Weight free squats making sure you get your "rear end" as low as possible keeping your heels on the floor and your feet parallel, plank positions, side leg raises.

Pre-hab can also be done more dynamically, do some "ladder work", box jumps, hurdle hops, skipping, lunge jumps and squat jumps to name a few. These especially will reduce your risk of ankle and knee injury.

Google pre-hab excerises when you have a moment there is a lot out there about them.

Your program looks very good, simple and effective, I like it!
 
S

stokey_14

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I know you asked Stokey but I wanted to add a bit.

Pre-hab is designed to prevent injury. It builds strength in core (not just core as in abs) muscles and tendons that give you stability.

These include: Weight free squats making sure you get your "rear end" as low as possible keeping your heels on the floor and your feet parallel, plank positions, side leg raises.

Pre-hab can also be done more dynamically, do some "ladder work", box jumps, hurdle hops, skipping, lunge jumps and squat jumps to name a few. These especially will reduce your risk of ankle and knee injury.

Google pre-hab excerises when you have a moment there is a lot out there about them.

Your program looks very good, simple and effective, I like it!

Spot on, Google and have a read, lot more knowledgeable people than my self out there have written about this topic.

Shoulder health is something i place emphasis on (do a lot of work especially with boxing ) band pull apart, face pulls and mobility drills etc

Stokey
 
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