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European Migrant Crisis- Solutions?

Discussion in 'Current & Military Affairs Discussion Forum.' started by DD, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. TheGeek

    TheGeek Well-Known Member

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    E could trade out 20million wasters to even the books. We could easy fill that quota :D

    Geek
     
  2. Old Man

    Old Man Ex-Matelot

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    Oddly enough, I've never seen any calls for British ex-pats to return here or not to go and live abroad in the first place. And I wonder how many have gone with no intention of working?

    Seems to me that anybody who puts so much effort into coming here might just be the sort who intends to make something of themselves.

    I don't know how many have migrated here in the past 60 years but however many it is, I can discern no negative impact on my life.

    I listened to a woman on the radio the other day ; she said that virtually every young woman from where she had come from, had been raped. She wanted only to live somewhere where women were treated with respect. Her English was perfect. I simply could not conclude that she, or anyone in her position, should be stopped from doing so.
     
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  3. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Similarly, this issue has actually been a naturally occurring event from the cradle of humanity, thought to have been in East Africa, since apes first walked upright.

    The only thing that has changed is humans who populated the continents and became self-sufficient have forever tried to close the door behind them to stop others sharing their success.

    The UK, so far as is known, became uninhabited during successive ice ages and became re-populated from equatorial regions during periods of global warming. With the exception of borders and boundaries, little has changed.
     
  4. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    Unfortunately they didn't have a welfare state back then. The real issue here is can we continue to have a welfare state and open door immigration policy. I no longer believe that the state helps those that pay in - so soon people will stop paying in. Maybe that is what they want, using immigration as the hammer to end the welfare system.
     
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  5. TheGeek

    TheGeek Well-Known Member

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    I agree with you that the system no longer, or does little to help those paying in, however the problem is, we have no choice but to continue to pay in, as for the majority of us the money is deducted before we see it.

    Geek
     
  6. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Swerving slightly off topic, the biggest single UK welfare benefit is the state pension. And yes, it is a welfare benefit according to DWP. Understandably, many retirees object to the 'welfare' label as they have contributed to National Insurance for much of their lives. The con is that NI has never been an insurance policy and it never will be. The title of this tax is a deception.

    Youngsters starting work today should be aware that the aging demographic profile of the UK means that it is unlikely that they will get a meaningful state pension when they reach retirement age although they will have an obligation to pay for mine in a few years, naturally.
     
  7. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    Correct unfortunately.

    What I'm currently witnessing though is a massive rise in those who have the self employed status tag because employing people directly is now so expensive and about to get even more expensive as this living wage nonsense is about to hit £9.20 an hour. If I pay someone £20k a year, what leaves my bank as an employer is about £27k. As it gets more expensive to employ people, those people stop paying tax directly. Whilst you are right that staff can't stop paying tax, employers certainly can - I do.

    I'm working until I drop, I know that and to be honest I wouldn't want to retire anyway. As my post above though, the Government now expect employers to pay into something called "Workplace pension". That's the employer and employee paying out for something twice, something that won't be there when you go to claim it.

    Yep, that's just what I want to do :( - I think I'll continue to pass on hiring anyone and stay well out of all that nonsense.

    Of course with any good ponzi scheme it needs new people paying in, I don't see that these days compared to my Dad's generation. As I have grown up, I have watched trick and fiddle rob people of their income when they went to collect, whilst people that haven't paid in walk away with full pay.

    In the words of the intellectual giant that is George Bush "fool me once, fool me - can't get fooled again"
     
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  8. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Workplace Pension is a desperate but ultimately futile attempt to defuse the 'demographic timebomb' of there being no money to support those who retire from 2050 onwards.

    Back in the early 1990s actuaries were predicting the demographic timebomb and suggesting that civil unrest driven by the resentment of the young towards the old was a probability rather than a possibility. If I live that long I'll probably be too addled by dementia to care.
     
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  9. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    Very true, and it's having an adverse effect on employers. The scariest words to business "Hi I'm from the Government and here to help" - It's like a soldier with a grenade "What's this pin do?"

    £9.20 living Wage, Workplace pensions and that's the Conservatives, yet they think Corbyn is a mad throwback to the 80's. -banghead-
     
  10. TheGeek

    TheGeek Well-Known Member

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    That's all fine and well, but even as a self employed contractor, you're still liable for tax and NI.

    Geek
     
  11. GreyWing

    GreyWing Nobody

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    Lot more things are tax deductible when self employed, home internet, fuel, new cars, home utilities. National Insurance is almost voluntary. That's if people bother paying at all.