Excuses For Leaving.

Caversham

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I have always been impressed with the honesty of guys on this site who have handed their chit in, because they were not up to it. There is no shame in your decision to leave because you found the training too hard, but I think that this guy has taken whinging to a new level.

My advice is; be honest with everyone, including yourself.

Recruit.jpg
Alan
 

Ninja_Stoker

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I'm guessing that was quite an old news article as recruits cannot "buy themselves out" nowadays.

Good to see the press once again confuse the word "Marine" (meaning "of the sea") with the Army.

To be honest, the cited reason for quitting is still a common gripe today. Some people just don't get the concept of "group responsibility". It is a complete pain receiving extra drill and phys on behalf of a right nugget make, no mistake, especially if the said individual keeps making the same mistakes. The issue is that you do not let someone make the mistake, much as the same as you wouldn't let someone stumble unwittingly into a situation that could endanger their life or those who are in their company.

The adage is there's no "I" in 'team'.

(Although one must concede there are shed-loads in 'individual brilliance')
 

arny01

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The reason we have the best armed forces in the world, is because of the "shared responsibility" training methods. There is an "I'm alright" jack attitude here on civvie Street, where everyone looks out for themselves.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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The reason we have the best armed forces in the world, is because of the "shared responsibility" training methods. There is an "I'm alright" jack attitude here on civvie Street, where everyone looks out for themselves.

I was in a previous civvie job, and it really griped my poo the jack mentality. And its creeping into the Public Services aswell. And with the recent health and safety madness, and people who haven't got a clue sticking their oar into Military Training, it's going to get worse in the Militsry too.

That's what training was good for, although 1 person may screw up, you all have to pull together, get the 'extra phys' done, laugh it off, and crack on.
If it goes wrong on Ops, you can't just chin it off and go jack. You're all in the sh!t together. If you drop a ball and make a mistake, you put your hands up, and you all work around it. Get the job done. Then it gets dealt with in the bar when you get back.
 

john lewis

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I have always been impressed with the honesty of guys on this site who have handed their chit in, because they were not up to it. There is no shame in your decision to leave because you found the training too hard, but I think that this guy has taken whinging to a new level.

My advice is; be honest with everyone, including yourself.

Recruit.jpg
Alan
I have always been told by my mate if I leave because it's to hard I'm an idiot (polite version of what he said), as training is meant to feel impossible but if I don't actually enjoy the soldiering aspects of training then it's acceptable to leave because it's not the career for you
 

Caversham

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There is an "I'm alright" jack attitude here on civvie Street, where everyone looks out for themselves.

Civvy street takes a lot of getting used to! The one exception used to be Public Sector jobs, such as Police, Fire Fighters, Prison Service etc, where a lot of guys leaving end up. May have changed nowadays, but I hope not.

I don't know what the big reasons for leaving, but I can remember hearing that "My Sgt/Cpls didn't like me/ didn't get on with me/etc".

Just be truthful!

Alan
 

robbo09

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I was cringing reading that article. How on earth does a whingebag like that get in the paper and able to tell his tale about him getting a few press ups during Royal Marines recruit training and hurting his hands, bless him.

My hands were like breeze blocks especially after Ex but I didn't go moaning to the paper :mad: I just used some Norwegian hand cream, magical stuff!
 

03092014

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How much in today's money was £20 back when the article was published?
 

Chelonian

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How much in today's money was £20 back when the article was published?

I'm just guessing at the age of the clipping but it could date back to the mid-1970s. If so, £20 was worth about £200 if I recall correctly. Put another way, one could enjoy a good night out on the beer and possibly catch a cab home for about £5 back then. Assuming that one's wit, charm and film star good looks hadn't enticed a young lady to offer bed and breakfast, thus saving the cab fare.
 

Caversham

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Am I missing something here? He bought himself out? Was there no DAOR back then?
There used to be an option originally called D by P, (Discharge by Purchase), later changed to PVR, (Premature Voluntary Release). The original D by P used to be £20 at around 12 weeks, not far short of a week's wages back then. The minimum time you signed up for was 9 years, but depending on manning you could apply for D by P/PVR during your service, with the average amount payable being £150, quite a large amount back then.

Hadn't realised that the article was that old when I posted it, but the message is still relevant now as it was back then.

Alan
 

robbo09

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That is a lot of money, especially back then! Probably made some lads think that bit more before calling a decision like that.

I never realised it was like that. You learn something new everyday!
 

Chelonian

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Probably made some lads think that bit more before calling a decision like that.

A fair number would simply desert and go 'on the run' if they couldn't raise the money. Frankly—in what passes for 'peace time'—it doesn't make sense for the armed services, or any employer, to compel an employee to remain against his or her will. Firstly, such individuals have a toxic effect on everyone else and secondly, the cost of enforcing the policy can be eye-wateringly expensive.
 

Caversham

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A fair number would simply desert and go 'on the run' if they couldn't raise the money. Frankly—in what passes for 'peace time'—it doesn't make sense for the armed services, or any employer, to compel an employee to remain against his or her will. Firstly, such individuals have a toxic effect on everyone else and secondly, the cost of enforcing the policy can be eye-wateringly expensive.
Or declare that they were gay. Straight outside, usually via Colchester.

Alan
 

Fibonarchie

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What an arrse to go crying to the paper. There's no shame in leaving. Its not for everyone and never has been. There's a reason the slogan used to be '99% need not apply'. There is however shame in trying to save fave by claiming that it is 'unfair' or whatever BS that guy was giving it. If you give in, keep some integrity and admit that it wasn't for you. Especially don't go trying to discourage others from it. That guy just didn't want his mates to succeed where he failed.
 

Old Man

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When I joined the RN in 1970, being able to buy yourself out was a relatively new thing. I think the £20 applied during the first six months. Either that or at the 3 and 6 month points. Previously, you signed for 9 years from the age of 18, I think. Hence, anybody buying themselves out was newsworthy and there wasn't a lot of it about.

We were initially paid £7.00 per fortnight.

I got in the local papers twice during my service. Was asked a few questions in order to produce copy but what appeared bore no relation to my actual answers.

It's a pointless exercise criticising the lad in question - it was a different time with different rules.

Everything passes, everything changes, just do what you think you should do.
And who knows baby, someday maybe, I'll come and be crying to you.
 
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