Extra curricular activities/Leadership examples?

Discussion in 'POC Section' started by Blue_Steel, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. Blue_Steel

    Blue_Steel New Member

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    Hello Chaps

    I am just finishing my second year of university and have my heart set on a gaining a commission with the Royal Marines. My only worry is trying to find examples of leadership and skills. I plan to try and get onto some volunteer projects, experience a year of UOTC and organise some charity events all of which have been advised on this site.
    I just wanted to know would this be enough to hold as evidence of leadership/organisation?. I also was wondering if just smashing the standards of the POC and AIB on the day and getting a good result would mean that a lack of experience in these fields would be far less significant?.

    What are your thoughts?
     
  2. Adamos

    Adamos Active Member

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    You seem to have enough there mate to show you have done it.

    The main emphasis in POC and AIB is that you can demonstrate you can do it. Worry more about what you can do and not what you have done.
     
  3. Blue_Steel

    Blue_Steel New Member

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    Thanks for the reply mate.

    Yeah I am conscious that some of the guys who do get onto the batch have some rather outstanding achievements which i imagine are great material for the variouse interviews on both the POC and AIB. My plan is to get as much under my belt in the next 18 months before i apply in order to demonstrate some evidence of what the AIB and POC want so see in terms of leadership examples. What you said about just showing them that you can do is good news because i guess success is all down to preparation which can be worked on and worked on and worked on! :smile:

    Are you in the midst of applying for YO then mate?
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    University is an ideal opportunity to develop at least 3 years worth of leadership experience, for those that have gained little through school (captaining sports teams, Duke of Edinburgh Award Schemes, Princes Trust, Camp America etc) or working their way through the ranks of uniformed youth organisations such as Sea Cadets, Sea Scouts, Scouts, Army Cadets & Air Cadets.

    Leaving it until the final year maybe cutting it a bit fine as the UOTC/URNU/UAS organisations prefer you enrol in the first year, however membership of university clubs & societies throughout Uni, together with part time jobs involving responsibility usally manage to hone management skills is a variety of areas.
     
  5. Matt4017

    Matt4017 Active Member

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    Unfortunately you may struggle to get into UOTC as I think you usually have to have at least 2 years at uni left (the one at mines does). Committee positions on clubs and societies, faculty/ year academic reps, D of E, volunteer work, and organising events/ charitable events are however more than adequate for demonstrating drive, leadership qualities, willingness to challenge oneself and responsibility.

    At the end of the day, as Adam has said, it comes down to your performance at POC and AIB. Having climbed Everest and been head organiser of the London Marathon isn't going to count for toffee if you can't run the endurance course or babble like an idiot in the Planex.
     
  6. WannabeMarine86

    WannabeMarine86 New Member

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    They say you need to have at least 2 years left but I joined in my last year of uni and a few other people I met did. Tell them you've got 2 years left and you won't have a problem, some people are undecided on whether to do Master's degree's so technically they could have 2 years of education left. They're getting their money's worth out of you as your planning on joining the Armed Forces afterwards.

    Problem is, the 1st year is mainly to introduce you to military basics and there were no leadership opportunities until the 2nd year where I was. If you can put up with kids I'd reccommend becoming an adult instructor of cadets instead.
     
  7. Blue_Steel

    Blue_Steel New Member

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    Yeah the Major of the unit said that it would be fine, however the first stage is just basic fieldcraft and skill to arms stuff. I dont suppose there is any chance of squeezing a second UOTC year after i graduate? :cheesy: .
    I was also thinking of taking a year out after uni and using it to really focus on my application, train, do some leadership events and challenges so by the time i apply i will have a fair load under my belt. My thinking is that I would be able to focus easy as opposed to juggling dissertations, final year stuff and all the rest. As I have read, the key seems to be preparation so would you say that this is a good move?
     
  8. WannabeMarine86

    WannabeMarine86 New Member

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    I wouldn't see a problem with them letting you stay on for an extra year after you graduate especially if you made a good impression in the first year. They say it's not a recruitment tool but their goal is obviously to get people to consider a job in the Armed Forces which you are so if they get a good officer out of you in the long run then it's win-win.

    I never got asked in my 2nd year whether I was still a student or not and neither did anybody else I know, in fact I don't remember ever being asked about university since the initial recruitment day. A mate of mine wasn't even a student, he was working full-time and still had a NUS card from his college days so shown that and said he was in the local uni. The rules are there but only because they think being in university automatically makes you potential officer material, he's now going through Sandhurst so it's obviously worked for him.
     
  9. Blue_Steel

    Blue_Steel New Member

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    Hey guys

    Just thought i would let you know that i have stumbled upon a goldmine opportunity for leadership experience. I gave my local scout/cubs troop a ring to inquire about any possible volunteering posts and it turns out that they are allways in need of a bit of extra help. I talked to the guy that ran the troop and he said that one could start by doing supporting roles such as organising wide games and general authority related tasks. He said that you could go as far as you want and just build up more responsibility and get to team leader level (nail on the head right? :smile: ).

    I think that this will be a plus because the cubs are a uniformed organisation who have a slight hierarchy which in relation to the Royal marines, is relevant. The other fact is that these scouts/cubs/beaver organisations are not the most well funded of groups and therefore need as much support and help as they can get. I'm off to do an introduction with them in a few weeks but I am certain that they are an easy relevent persuit to anyone who is looking for a good oppertunity to slap on the CV and talk about in the POC or AIB interviews. This, along with my planed paras 10 race and variouse charity organised events should get me started on a healthy list of things to show at the interviews interview stages of my application.

    What do you think?

    Take it easy guys.
     

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