Eye test advice

Cameron97

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Hello, I am asking this for my son.
When he was 10 he suffered a blunt trauma injury to his eye which has left him with a very small encapsulated cataract - basically a scar. He does not have 'cataracts' , meaning there is no progressive eye disease.

This does not affect his vision, his periphery vision is not affected, his binocular vision is perfect as is his stereo vision.

he has recently been assessed as being slightly short sighted - my fault, however he would be within legal limits to drive with his eyesight without glasses, which is better than mine when corrected!

He is currently 14, his dream is to join the Marines and he has been training for ages, very fit, mixed Martial Arts, runs miles.

Will this injury prevent him from being accepted or would a letter from the consultant be a good idea. The consultant felt that he would be OK, but he is now worrying.

Any advice on where we can turn for help now would be great.

Thank you
 

Utopia

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Best bet would to go to an optician with a copy of the Force's VA standards (I'll hunt a link down), and ask them to see where he would currently stand.

Obviously eyesight changes and this would by no means be an official yes/no. That's something that only really will crop up at the medical which would be a fair few years down the line.

Others who are more experienced in this area may be able to further comment but from the perspective of someone who's had eye surgery and passed, I see little to differentitate post-surgery scarring (very minor) with an encapsulated cataract. However, a Dr may see things differently.

If he is currently able to see well (a little short sighted is no issue, it depends what you class as a little however) and there seems to be no literature to instantly suggest an application would fail, I see no harm with continuing with the goal of being an RM in mind. Be aware however, that the medicals can and do mark the end of some peoples applications, but with perseverance and dedication, any temporary issues can usually be resolved.

EDIT: Also noted that the injury is only four years ago. When it is considered that an application may not be made for another three-four it is worth considering that any scarring in the eye MAY heal. Certainly, large damage can take many years to fully heal (as per old eye-surgery involving blades)
 

AVS

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Told I may be "slightly" long sighted, not a problem for me I'm told, so im sure he'll be fine!
 

Rocky5748

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Hello, I am asking this for my son.
When he was 10 he suffered a blunt trauma injury to his eye which has left him with a very small encapsulated cataract - basically a scar. He does not have 'cataracts' , meaning there is no progressive eye disease.

This does not affect his vision, his periphery vision is not affected, his binocular vision is perfect as is his stereo vision.

he has recently been assessed as being slightly short sighted - my fault, however he would be within legal limits to drive with his eyesight without glasses, which is better than mine when corrected!

He is currently 14, his dream is to join the Marines and he has been training for ages, very fit, mixed Martial Arts, runs miles.

Will this injury prevent him from being accepted or would a letter from the consultant be a good idea. The consultant felt that he would be OK, but he is now worrying.

Any advice on where we can turn for help now would be great.

Thank you

Hi

I have something similar, from a blunt trauma injury- it may have been the same thing- I'm not too good with remembering medical terms.

My optician didn't batt an eye lid (ahem) when testing me for the RM. I am also short sighted (I'm only just allowed to drive without contacts/glasses) however, again I got through the testing with no problems.

I actually recall my optician remarking that you have to have very poor (uncorrected) eye site to not be accepted.

The obvious caveats to this is, I'm sure every one is assessed on a "case by case" basis, so just because one person got through doesn't meant everyone will.

Good luck to your son and credit to you for taking such an active interest in his career.

rocky
 
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