eyesight?

elliott16

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I was wundering whether it would be worth getting laser eye surgery, I know that they would accept glasses but would it not be easier not to wear any at all, might get broken during training etc.

My eyesight isnt all that bad, I dont normally wear glasses only for reading the board in class or to see long distance detail.
 

BradfordBulls

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Regarding the laser surgery I wouldn't reccomend it mate, i've heard it's frounded upon in the armed forced! And about the glasses getting broken dont worry, you'll be issued some supah indestructable ones before you go and some back-ups incase ;) hope i resolved your worrys! i have specs.. :P
 

Ninja_Stoker

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LASER EYE SURGERY

Standard reply sent to all persons considering laser surgery, it's worth reading in depth:

Thank you for your enquiry regarding eyesight corrective laser surgery (corneal refractive surgery) and the relevant Royal Navy Policy. The Naval Service does not endorse the use of laser surgery as a method to gain entry and there is no guarantee that such treatment will improve vision to an acceptable standard.

The Naval Service requires individuals to serve anywhere in the world, in extremes of climate and operational situations, which are remote from primary and secondary care. Therefore, even minor conditions such as the use of correcting lenses can take on much greater significance when even basic support is limited. As a consequence, medical screening is stringent and to a higher standard than might be expected for normal civilian employment.

In general, any defect or weakness of sight will be a bar to entry if these defects render an individual incapable of, or likely to be incapable of performing general duties in the Naval Service. The tri-Service standard for uncorrected visual acuity is right eye 6/60 and left eye> 6/60.

With regard to surgical correction of myopia or hypermetropia, it is acknowledged that the following methods are now considered suitable for entry on an individual case by case basis for non-specialist employment groups and subject to single Service requirements:

(a) Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)

(b) Laser Epithelial Keratomileusis (LASEK)

(c) Laser in-situ Keratomileusis

(d) Intrastromal Corneal Rings (ICRs), otherwise known as Intrastromal
Segments (ICS).


Entry will not be considered for Radical Keratotomy (RK), or Astigmatic Keratotomy (AK), or any other form of incisional refractive surgery, other than those procedures listed above. All invasive intraocular surgical procedures will remain a bar to entry.

In order to be considered a candidate must fulfil the following criteria and provide documentary evidence to support that:

(a) The pre-operative refractive error was not more than +6.00 or 6.00diopter (spherical equivalent) in either eye and;

(b) The best spectacle corrected visual acuity is 6/9 or better in each eye and;

(c) At least 12 months have elapsed since the date of the last surgery or enhancement procedure and;

(d) There has been no significant visual side effects secondary to the surgery affecting daily activities and;

(e) Refraction is stable; as defined by two refractions performed on each eye at least 6 months apart, with no more than 0.50 diopter difference in the spherical equivalent in each eye.

(f) Specialist visual function testing has been carried out with satisfactory results at least 12 months following surgery, including assessment of refraction, symmetry of visual acuity, high and low contrast sensitivity (with and without glare sources), astigmatism, glare, corneal clarity, masked mild hypermetropia and night vision.

An applicant who has undergone eyesight corrective laser surgery must supply evidence of the above and may be subject to evaluation by a Service Ophthalmic Consultant. Each case is considered on an individual basis and if all the criteria are met it may be possible to consider an application to enter the Naval Service.

Decisions regarding any kind of ophthalmic surgery should be discussed with an Ophthalmic Consultant. This letter should be taken to ophthalmic consultations where eyesight corrective laser surgery is to be discussed with a view to achieving the necessary eyesight standards for entry.
 

elliott16

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thanks for the help, so it really isnt worth the bother especially if it goes wrong...
 

sb146564

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Hi elliot. I had Laser eye surgery in december, and it was the best choice of my life. I have 20/20 vision, It is expensive, but welll worth it for life long eyesight. I went with Ultralase, there success rate is 98%, the 2% meaning that the person didn't have the results they wanted (Not perfect vision). I didn't know you could join the Marines with glasses to be honest, what about when your doing the mud run or the assault course. I would definately reccomend the surgery.
Downpoints, after surgery, you have to wait 1 year to become medically fit. Thats before any PRMC or POC.
There is a chance is will not improve vision to the required standard, but... Ultralase will do the surgery again, free of charge until you have desired sight! (Must wait at least 6 monts before each operation).
My surgery cost £2500, but it depends on your subscription.
It sounds like I am pushing ultralase, its just beacuse thats who I had mine done with.
In conclusion... Best choice i have ever made, waking up beaing able to see the time acoss my room, doing all sports without restrictions.
Just go an ask for a consultation, its free and it can make your mind up!
All the best
Ste
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Again to re-iterate, despite recommendations from those that have had laser eye surgery it is categorically not recommended, nor endorsed by the Royal Marines or Royal Navy.

If your eye sight is within the minimum standards for entry, then there is little to be gained & much to be potentially lost both financially & physically. The fact that your glasses may get broken in recruit Training is of little consequence by comparison.

When all's said and done it is the individual's choice and it has to be said many people serving have had laser eye surgery and think it was money well spent.
 

Charlie

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i wear glasses, and i was worried about glasses in RT, and all that kinda stuff, but i went into the opticians and tried some glasses on , had a chat etc and iw as really confident after that, they showed me how they can change the shape of em etc, so they can be really tight and not fall off, and they'll show u cheap ones so breakages arent really an issue, just buy a couple of pairs etc

so basically, if u *text deleted* need laser eye surgery, and glasses would do the trick, *text deleted* bother with the hassle of surgery, as ninja said, alot could go wrong! its not worth *text deleted* whole career for something which could have bin dealt with by a £50 pair of glasses!
 

jimmy mal

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I am having laser eye surgery before i join. It is something i would have had even if i wasn't joining the marines. A guy at my work had it 8 years ago and said it was the best money he had ever spent. It does come down to the individual and i can understand the reasons for not having it done. Personally i can't wait to have it done and believe it would make my life alot easier but i respect everyones individual opinion.

Jim
 

Ulick

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Heheh, I had mine 2 1/2 years ago well before I decided on going for the RM's so I'm stuffed either way :) my eyesight was okish before it, I just got tired of broken glasses/loses/ect...oh and the damn fogging up while running, annoying as hell.
 
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