Feeling Depressed or Anxious in relation to bereavement? Read on.

Harsh

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All seems fine. I have never to my recollection had any mental health issues on my record or before. Only thing I have to worry about is my ingrown toe nails both of which have been removed, luckily no further issues so should be in the clear!
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Would depression as result of poor circumstance make you barred. My mum has had terminal cancer since I was 12 and this has understandingly effected me, this and witnessing my grandmas death age 10 has left me obviously a bit sad and envious of other people. Today my head of faculty at college says she thinks I have depression, I completely disagree and know the main reason I'm annoyed and not always paying attention is due to me not being where I want to be. I hope that made sense, I don't want some misreading of my circumstances and attitude to result in a referral to GP. (Hope that made some sense) outside of college I'm happy but the entire dire routine leaves me frustrated! Sorry to hijack thread for my own gain.

Is your head of faculty a qualified Docter? No?
Well they can go outside and have a chat with themselves.


It just seems that college isn't sitting with you. I hated school, and I hated college. I just wanted to get stuck in and get cracking with things. But unfortunately education is a must.

Depression is a long term medical condition.
Sadness is not a medical condition.
Grief is not a medical condition.
Frustration is not a medical condition.
Boredom is not a medical condition.

"Depression" is a term that gets through around like some kind of label or as if it's some cure by saying it. I won't start a rant about the whole mental health issues and how it's dealt with by the NHS or people.

If you find talking to someone helps, then do it. But just because the thought of being stuck in a college all day doesn't excite you, doesn't mean that you are depressed.
 

Chelonian

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At the risk of sounding like one of those annoying announcements beloved of radio and TV continuity announcers:

If you think that you may have been affected by any of these issues, please read Ninja's post#1 at the top of this thread.
 

Harsh

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Is your head of faculty a qualified Docter? No?
Well they can go outside and have a chat with themselves.


It just seems that college isn't sitting with you. I hated school, and I hated college. I just wanted to get stuck in and get cracking with things. But unfortunately education is a must.

Depression is a long term medical condition.
Sadness is not a medical condition.
Grief is not a medical condition.
Frustration is not a medical condition.
Boredom is not a medical condition.

"Depression" is a term that gets through around like some kind of label or as if it's some cure by saying it. I won't start a rant about the whole mental health issues and how it's dealt with by the NHS or people.

If you find talking to someone helps, then do it. But just because the thought of being stuck in a college all day doesn't excite you, doesn't mean that you are depressed.
I would probably enjoy college a lot more if they had your kind off attitude!
 

Mac20

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Medical standards for entry relating to psychiatric conditions : http://www.arrse.co.uk/community/attachments/148214/
Hi, I've noticed that in the link quoted it states that a 4 year period of no symptoms or treatment after a second episode of mild anxiety/low mood/depression must have passed in order to be medically fit.
However, in the latest edition of the JSP 950 from Aug 2019 it makes no mention to this, instead it says "2 or more episodes of anxiety/low mood/depression would make the candidate UNFIT" with no reference to time periods as mentioned in the quoted article above.

Is the 4 year period of no symptoms after a second mild episode still in practice or is it a very much "2 strikes and you're out" policy? As a bit of background the episodes were brought about through bereavement and a suicidal sibling due to drink.

Apologies for the long post and thanks in advance!
 
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