Fitness for Under 16s - My 5 key points

Hyperhippo

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Jul 12, 2015
Posts
586
Reaction score
443
Hi everyone,

So whilst giving help to another member of the forum today who is still at school, it came to my attention that inevitably there will be more guys and gals joining this brilliant forum in the future and more than likely some will range in the 14 - 16 age range and possibly younger.

I joined this forum at 16 and at times felt a bit overwhelmed with all the phys guys were doing and all the terminology that comes with it.

So, with the experience I have from training at 15 onwards and the advice I gave today I thought I would put together this thread as a reference point for younger members who are new to training and shouldn’t be jumping into doing hill sprints and other intense sessions straight away.

1. Enjoy being a teenager - My first piece of advice is this. Enjoy your school years, if your mates are all going out for a game of footy or off to the cinema of an evening and you’ve got a run or circuit planned - choose your mates! Don’t let phys envelope your life, your more than likely quite a while from applying yet anyway and when you do apply you’ve still got bags of time to meet the required standards, so enjoy your time with friends socialising.

2. Start being smart - If you have played rugby in PE today do you think it’s wise to go out for a run later on when you get home? It will benefit you more to stretch off and if your desperate to do phys, then a 10 minutes circuit will be plenty. Likewise, if your PE teacher has introduced you to the school gym today and your struggling to lift your arms for the first time ever, don’t do a circuit later.

3. Keep running to 2 - 3 times weekly - I think it’s more important at this age range that you forget distance and focus on time. Gradually build up your running so you can run 20 - 25 minutes comfortably and maintain this. Once you’ve applied, or are about to apply for the Royal Marines or your chosen service, then start looking at covering the distances required in the time required. A BFT will be well within the 20 - 25 minute range anyway. And don’t run 2 or 3 days in a row - have a rest day from running between each run. Stay away from treadmills, if you have a good base for running when you apply, then realistically you’ll only need 6 - 8 weeks of specific treadmill for the PJFT, but don’t worry about that now. Count PE lessons as a run!

4. Extra equipment done cheaply - When I was just starting out I saved milk bottles. 2 x 2 pints, 2 X 4 pints and 2 X 6 pints and filled them with water. These were my substitute for dumbbells/kettlebells, and I would use them for Overhead Press, Rows, Squats, Walkimg Lunges, Sit Ups and Russian Twists.

5. Circuits - A point I won’t delve into as there is plenty of information on how to make them on the internet and plenty of examples on this forum. Although I will add stick to your body weight exercises (Press Ups, Sit Ups, pull ups, tricep dips, Squats, lunges, planks, and all their variations) and what I call the “Third Leg” exercises (Overhead Press, rows, weighted squats, walking lunges - 5kg - 15kg). If your wondering why I call them the third leg exercises is because you have your two legs to stand on, the very basis of exercises press ups and pull ups etc. but the third leg is referring to exercises that take the workload off the two legs. I.e. Overhead Press - shoulder stability and strength (injury prevention in other words.)

Hope this helps
 

Nod1201

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2016
Posts
176
Reaction score
85
Hi everyone,

So whilst giving help to another member of the forum today who is still at school, it came to my attention that inevitably there will be more guys and gals joining this brilliant forum in the future and more than likely some will range in the 14 - 16 age range and possibly younger.

I joined this forum at 16 and at times felt a bit overwhelmed with all the phys guys were doing and all the terminology that comes with it.

So, with the experience I have from training at 15 onwards and the advice I gave today I thought I would put together this thread as a reference point for younger members who are new to training and shouldn’t be jumping into doing hill sprints and other intense sessions straight away.

1. Enjoy being a teenager - My first piece of advice is this. Enjoy your school years, if your mates are all going out for a game of footy or off to the cinema of an evening and you’ve got a run or circuit planned - choose your mates! Don’t let phys envelope your life, your more than likely quite a while from applying yet anyway and when you do apply you’ve still got bags of time to meet the required standards, so enjoy your time with friends socialising.

2. Start being smart - If you have played rugby in PE today do you think it’s wise to go out for a run later on when you get home? It will benefit you more to stretch off and if your desperate to do phys, then a 10 minutes circuit will be plenty. Likewise, if your PE teacher has introduced you to the school gym today and your struggling to lift your arms for the first time ever, don’t do a circuit later.

3. Keep running to 2 - 3 times weekly - I think it’s more important at this age range that you forget distance and focus on time. Gradually build up your running so you can run 20 - 25 minutes comfortably and maintain this. Once you’ve applied, or are about to apply for the Royal Marines or your chosen service, then start looking at covering the distances required in the time required. A BFT will be well within the 20 - 25 minute range anyway. And don’t run 2 or 3 days in a row - have a rest day from running between each run. Stay away from treadmills, if you have a good base for running when you apply, then realistically you’ll only need 6 - 8 weeks of specific treadmill for the PJFT, but don’t worry about that now. Count PE lessons as a run!

4. Extra equipment done cheaply - When I was just starting out I saved milk bottles. 2 x 2 pints, 2 X 4 pints and 2 X 6 pints and filled them with water. These were my substitute for dumbbells/kettlebells, and I would use them for Overhead Press, Rows, Squats, Walkimg Lunges, Sit Ups and Russian Twists.

5. Circuits - A point I won’t delve into as there is plenty of information on how to make them on the internet and plenty of examples on this forum. Although I will add stick to your body weight exercises (Press Ups, Sit Ups, pull ups, tricep dips, Squats, lunges, planks, and all their variations) and what I call the “Third Leg” exercises (Overhead Press, rows, weighted squats, walking lunges - 5kg - 15kg). If your wondering why I call them the third leg exercises is because you have your two legs to stand on, the very basis of exercises press ups and pull ups etc. but the third leg is referring to exercises that take the workload off the two legs. I.e. Overhead Press - shoulder stability and strength (injury prevention in other words.)

Hope this helps

Great post! I made the mistake of rushing into treadmill running although I was 'fit for my age' at 15 when I began reading into the marines joining process I jumped on a treadmill and attempted the run leading to injury, this thread should help a lot of younger potential Royal Marines with their smarter training!
 

New Threads

Top