Freezing in combat

Ross154

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Evening all,

One of my biggest fears, and I know I'm not alone in this, is freezing during my first time in combat. I'm just wondering, how often does this actually happen amongst British troops? Is their training carried out in such a way as to make this highly unlikely, or does it happen quite often but just go unreported?

Cheers,
Ross
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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:thefinger:

PRS (Personal Radiator Systems) will be provided whenever the weather drops below 10C.
 

Steffan

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correct me if i'm wrong but methinks he means like freezing up the first time he gets into a contact
 

OneMoreWrap

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Haha ^

I can imagine just freezing in first contact, but only the first time.
After that in sure I would have developed to the idea that I am in conflict and it's inevitable.

Sure you will 'warm' to it!
 

Illustrious

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It's nothing that can be predicted unfortunately despite the training we do. During my first contact my first thought was to launch myself into a ditch and take up arcs. I hadn't a sodding clue what was happening so it was impulse. I didn't even realise it was an IED contact at first, I couldn't even tell you what I thought it was if I'm honest.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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correct me if i'm wrong but methinks he means like freezing up the first time he gets into a contact
I know, I was taking the mick/playing on the words.

In seriousness, it's also a fear of mine but as Illustrious says, hopefully instinct will kick in.
 

jamie_82

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Evening all,

One of my biggest fears, and I know I'm not alone in this, is freezing during my first time in combat. I'm just wondering, how often does this actually happen amongst British troops? Is their training carried out in such a way as to make this highly unlikely, or does it happen quite often but just go unreported?

Cheers,
Ross
Let's go back in time to when your last pub, street or school fight was............when the guy was hitting you, what did you do? Did you:
A: Did nothing and just protected your face?
B: Hit him back?

If the answer was B, then relax, i think you will be just fine.
If the answer was A, i suggest you go get some practice before they issue the guns mate! :biggrin:

All joking aside though mate, you will be fine. If i was on my own in a gun fight i admit i would probably panic somewhat, but i'd imagine if i had a dozen close mates around me who were also getting shot at, i'd go f'ing ballistic! :)
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Having experienced first hand the experience of freezing or becoming acquainted with the true meaning of the word petrified, the sensation only lasts a millisecond then an NCO shouts an order & training literally kicks-in, automatic drills take-over.

Once you are occupied, doing what needs doing, adrenaline takes over with no space for self doubts.

After the intense buzz of action, when you have time to think about it, you can come down with a bit of a bump - a bit like after being in a car crash or near-miss situation, delayed shock.

Most guys get over it by talking & joking about it with those who had the same experience - sometimes even as it's still happening. Afterwards it's something that sets you apart from your civilian mates as they have to experience the sensation to understand it. Thereafter, you may find yourself yearning for that 'buzz' because it's unforgettable.
 

Ross154

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Let's go back in time to when your last pub, street or school fight was............when the guy was hitting you, what did you do? Did you:
A: Did nothing and just protected your face?
B: Hit him back?

If the answer was B, then relax, i think you will be just fine.
If the answer was A, i suggest you go get some practice before they issue the guns mate! :biggrin:

All joking aside though mate, you will be fine. If i was on my own in a gun fight i admit i would probably panic somewhat, but i'd imagine if i had a dozen close mates around me who were also getting shot at, i'd go f'ing ballistic! :)
The last fight I was in (against a would-be shoplifter), he was so high on whatever illegal substance he'd managed to get hold of that even if he punched me and I hadn't bothered to block it, I think he'd still have missed. But there's a big difference between street fights where, generally speaking, the worst that can happen to you is broken bones and dented pride; and having a squad of Taliban actually trying to kill you or blow you up. Street fights last a few seconds themselves and have a few months Police investiagtions, then it's all over and you get on with how things were before. Military combat could be where your life ends. It's a bit different. What you said in your post is what you'd like to do, but until you've been there, you can't know for sure what you will do.


Edit: Oh, and them comments about MacheteMeetsBiscuit's forward roll had me in tears! :uglyhammer:
 

Anthony_H

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I know Its not the same, but when I was in cadets we went on the demo. I had the lsw in my section, to say I was buzzing was an understatement even if all we got was 20 blanks. Any how, I had been on the range loads of times, I had my advanced shooting badge then followed by my marksman ship I had recently got. Along side that I had done plenty of blank firing on various weekends/camps before hand, but this was my first Srmo with blanks as the last time we never had a big enough unit, previous we had a ban on blanks and before that I was too young. I just remember the noise start, and zig zagging and going for cover, I got the bi pod down and and just froze. We had to use ear plugs, I couldn't make anything out, and just got confused it felt like ages. When I eventually got my bearings, I had no clear sight, and couldn't see where we was being fired from. So rules was no firing so I moved and knelt up behind cover. I just remember I got some matelot come kick me. Even though the srmo, before hand said if somthings in the way kneel or move. Well apparently it didn't apply to me because we was only allowed to use the lsw prone. I know it's only a gay cadet story, but still the pressure of how important the srmo was got to me not going to be the same as battle and the fear of being dead like. And when regrouped a felt so ashamed when I had to call out my ammo.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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Think a lot of that can be to do with the ear defenders. I left cadets nearly 4 years ago but on annual camp 08 we did a lot of blank firefights (and livefire on the ranges), unfortunately we were stuck with that wretched GPA1 rifle. I found my thinking was a lot clearer without defenders. In hindsight it was daft because there's a reason you wear them but in some night-time firefights when instructors couldn't see, I'd slip them off my ears onto my neck for a few shots and it was all a lot clearer.

Also, as a cadet the skills haven't been drilled into you again and again so confusion sets in quite easily.
 

Anthony_H

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Think a lot of that can be to do with the ear defenders. I left cadets nearly 4 years ago but on annual camp 08 we did a lot of blank firefights (and livefire on the ranges), unfortunately we were stuck with that wretched GPA1 rifle. I found my thinking was a lot clearer without defenders. In hindsight it was daft because there's a reason you wear them but in some night-time firefights when instructors couldn't see, I'd slip them off my ears onto my neck for a few shots and it was all a lot clearer.

Also, as a cadet the skills haven't been drilled into you again and again so confusion sets in quite easily.
We used to get those daft yellow ear plugs, defenders on the range. The l98a1 was what we had and the lsw on occasions. Its been Nerly 8 years since I was in cadets now I feel old. It was getting crap towards the end of it, we couldn't do anything. We had a Marine who used to come to unit who was an ex cadet. And we loved the *text deleted**text deleted**text deleted**text deleted* we got on the park when he was down. I was told he wasn't coming anymore, as giving us a good 'extra phys' for poor admin was bullying and people didn't like it he was asked not to come back that amogst other things they didn't like.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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Lucky about the yellow ones then, it was defenders all the way for us!
And yeah discipline seems to still be an issue in cadet orgs. I was ACF but ATC mates, Sgts now, say that kids' parents make complaints because their child has been shouted at :weird:
 

jamie_82

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The last fight I was in (against a would-be shoplifter), he was so high on whatever illegal substance he'd managed to get hold of that even if he punched me and I hadn't bothered to block it, I think he'd still have missed. But there's a big difference between street fights where, generally speaking, the worst that can happen to you is broken bones and dented pride; and having a squad of Taliban actually trying to kill you or blow you up. Street fights last a few seconds themselves and have a few months Police investiagtions, then it's all over and you get on with how things were before. Military combat could be where your life ends. It's a bit different. What you said in your post is what you'd like to do, but until you've been there, you can't know for sure what you will do.


Edit: Oh, and them comments about MacheteMeetsBiscuit's forward roll had me in tears! :uglyhammer:
Oh sure mate i know what you're saying. My post was meant to be a bit tounge in cheek though :biggrin:
Im well aware a street fight and a war zone are 2 worlds apart and one doesn't truely know how he would react untill he's in that posistion.
 

Ross154

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Oh sure mate i know what you're saying. My post was meant to be a bit tounge in cheek though :biggrin:
Im well aware a street fight and a war zone are 2 worlds apart and one doesn't truely know how he would react untill he's in that posistion.
Ah right, sorry. Missed the "joking aside" comment, otherwise I'd have known it was there for humour. I did consider shooting the shoplifter. Does that count?
 

jamie_82

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Ah right, sorry. Missed the "joking aside" comment, otherwise I'd have known it was there for humour. I did consider shooting the shoplifter. Does that count?
Yeah that counts :biggrin:

I too once stopped a shoplifter. Well it was actually a group of teenagers. Twice on the same night in the same shop funnily enough! But it's a long story and i can't be bothered. One of them had a knife though. He gave it all the "do you know who i am" milarky and threatened to stab me. I stupidily lifted my top up and said "go on then." Safe to safe he didn't have the *text deleted**text deleted**. I only acted because there were 2 female shop workers who were both crying their eyes out at the whole ordeal. If i was on my own i probably would've shat myself. Funny how you grow a pair when you have to and how they dissapere when you don't have to. haha
At the end, Blockbuster gave me a free rental that night as it was their shop i was in hahahaah
 
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