Fueling for Performance- part one

Broadsword55

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As a strength and conditioning coach joining the RM, I thought it would be of some use to give you everything you need to know about fueling for performance whether it be before a test or training.

Macronutrients:

Carbohydrates: 65%
Protein: 15%
Fat: 20%

Determining Energy Needs:


Activity Levelg carb/kg body weight
light (<1hr/day)4-5
light-moderate (1hr/day)5-6
moderate (1-2hrs/day)6-7
moderate-heavy (2-4hrs/day)7-8
heavy (>4hrs/day)8-10

Carbohydrate:

Carbohydrates will be the main source to fuel training on a daily basis.
• 60-65% of your daily food intake should be in the form of carbohydrates.
• Carbohydrate is stored in the muscle as glycogen.
• This glycogen is then broken down to release energy for sports movements.

Carbohydrate rich foods:
• Bread, pasta, rice, grains, potatoes, sugars
• Carbs can be broken down into starchy and sugary varieties
• Starchy carbs give a slow release of energy with sugary carbs giving a quick release

Protein:
• Four main types of protein: Whey protein, casein, soy protein, egg protein
• Protein is needed for muscle repair, growth and cell structure
• Can also be used as a source of fuel for energy production
• 15% of daily energy intake should come form protein

Amino acids:

• Amino acids are the building blocks for proteins
• There are 20 amino acids that can be used to form hundreds of other proteins
• 12 of the amino acids can be made in the body from combinations of other amino acids, carbs and nitrogen
• The other 8 amino acids are essential in the diet

Sources of protein:

Chicken, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, beef, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, walnuts, cashew nuts, peanuts, baked beans, red lentils, red kidney beans, chick peas, soya milk, tofu and quorne.

Type of athleteDaily protein requirement g/kg bodyweight
Endurance athlete (moderate-heavy load)1.2 - 1.4
Strength and power athlete1.4 - 1.8
Athlete on fat loss program 1.6 - 2.0
Athlete on weight gain program1.8 - 2.0

So try and vary your protein intake to fit your objective in your training so if you want more muscle in strength training with size sets, go for 1.4-1.8. Trying to lose some excess fat go for 1.8-2.0.

Fat:
• Approximately 20% of daily energy needs should come from fat

There are 3 main types of fats:

• Saturated - Mostly come from animal products such as butter, lard, cheese and meat fat
• Monounsaturated - Olive, rapeseed, groundnut, hazelnut and almond oil, avocados, olives, nuts and seeds
• Polyunsaturated - Vegetable oils and fish oils Essential fatty

Essential fatty acids:
Essential fatty acids are a subgroup of polyunsaturated fats
• They can’t be made by the body and have to come from the diet

There are 2 series:
• Omega-3
• Omega-6

• Omega-3 is involved in oxygen transport and may enhance performance

Essential fat in the body:

Essential fat includes the fat that forms:
• Part of cell membranes
• Brain tissue
• Nerve sheaths
• Bone marrow
• Fat surrounding organs
• A diet too low in fat will compromise these vital body functions

Thank you for reading part 1. If there is any interest the I will upload part 2 which will include tips on vitamins, minerals, hypotonic, hypertonic and isotonic drinks, pre and post training and event snacks/ meals, energy intake for increasing muscle and most importantly hydration with among other things.
 

Johnwayne

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Morning @Broadsword55

some very good information on here and definitely valuable. A lot of people tend to overlook the importance of eating well and the affect it has on training!

If you have some information on the role of Vitamins in the diet and also the intake of collagen (natural sources without having to supplement) and how it relates increased strength in bones and joints/injury reduction, that would be super helpful!
 

Rob20

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You clearly know your stuff. Great info. Certainly of benefit to those preparing for a tough event or looking to get fitter/healthier.

Unfortunately in RM training you won't be blessed with time or choice so its chips and beans all round and rations when in the field im afraid so bear that in mind :).
 

Broadsword55

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You clearly know your stuff. Great info. Certainly of benefit to those preparing for a tough event or looking to get fitter/healthier.

Unfortunately in RM training you won't be blessed with time or choice so its chips and beans all round and rations when in the field im afraid so bear that in mind :).
yeah I get that. Recruit training is just a calorie fest from what’s i’ve seen rather than tailoring your food intake. I’ve never really thought about that much and just aim to get my 5000 calories for the day but as you pointed out if you are getting fit to join or in the reserve forces it can be useful. In my experience knowing it gives you a good foundation
 

Caversham

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As @Rob20 says, it’s calories at CTC. Plus limited time to eat it. It’s a case of get in the main galley, heap scran onto your plate and get it down your neck and out, all in the shortest possible time.
Repeat four times a day!

Alan
 

Johnny_Anonie

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Interesting but as someone once said on this forum before- Some believe you can’t possibly get fit enough to pass recruit training without magic milkshakes yet generations of Royal Marines have done perfectly well with a healthy balanced diet and lots of phys. You can probably guess which camp the majority of our Royals fall in to.

Don’t overthink it.
 

Broadsword55

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Morning @Broadsword55

some very good information on here and definitely valuable. A lot of people tend to overlook the importance of eating well and the affect it has on training!

If you have some information on the role of Vitamins in the diet and also the intake of collagen (natural sources without having to supplement) and how it relates increased strength in bones and joints/injury reduction, that would be super helpful!
I’ll get onto that next. I’ll need to look into collagen because I thought it was just for skin but I’ve found a few very promising studies on it so thanks for pointing it out. I’m against supplements if you don’t have a deficiency because there is no science behind it plus there is no law against you and me pissing in a bottle and labelling it a vitamin supplement.
 

Broadsword55

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Interesting but as someone once said on this forum before- Some believe you can’t possibly get fit enough to pass recruit training without magic milkshakes yet generations of Royal Marines have done perfectly well with a healthy balanced diet and lots of phys. You can probably guess which camp the majority of our Royals fall in to.

Don’t overthink it.
yeah I’ve never used any of the advice I’ve just given and I despise the margin milkshakes although I did put up a full description of them all. The only time you’d use any of the advice put above is if you can’t gain weight or something because you aren’t getting enough carbs/ protein. I’m hoping the people too lazy to get fit naturally and juice on steroids probably don’t have the mental strength to pass rt
 

Illustrious

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As alluded to above;

I got into recruit training on macaroni cheese and sausages. I got out of recruit training on anything digestible, and some things not.

With that said, the post has been incredibly informative for those looking to etch out any extra possible gains. A basica understanding of nutrition is no bad thing, just dont expect to be able to track it accurately whilst in RT.

Thank you for the informative posts @Broadsword55
 

Broadsword55

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thank you.Yeah, entirely pointless for RT but I found it along with the other knowledge gathered over studying S&C coaching quite useful in my training
 
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