functional strength

Gump

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whats peoples views on doing powerlifting type training alongside circuit training and running?

As at the moment I'm trying to prove to my mate that it's possible to be as strong as a bear whilst being very fit aswell.

I know crossfit basically does this but im looking at more strength focused training than crossfit.
 
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Sotiris

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Strength training is one of the most fundamental forms of fitness. However, you don't necessarily have to lift weights to develop your strength.

Look into TABATA, lactate tolerance training and Matrix training to utterly destroy yourself.
 
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stokey_14

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Yes you can be fit and strong. As said strength is a pillar of physical fitness and with out it many other skills will drop off. However there are various forms of strength and it?s best to indicate which one you wish to improve. I get the feeling it is maximal strength, the ability to move the largest possible load. However there is also explosive strength which refers to the rate in which a load is moved and strength endurance which is the ability to continually and effectively move a load over a set period.

What do you consider ?power lifting type training? because to me that means training to improve your 1 Rep max in Bench press, Squat and deadlift as part of a competitive sport.

Do you mean weight lifting in general , in which case as Sotty pointed out this could include a huge range of resistance based training? Weights, bodyweight, odd objects, resistance bands can all be used to improve max/explosive or strength endurance.

Finally be careful using the words ?functional training? it gets thrown around a lot and can mean a whole host of things. In simple terms any sort of training that helps you achieve your goal is functional, if that goal is to stand on one leg on a swiss ball and count backwards for 100 then Deadlifting isn?t very ?functional? however to anyone wanting to run faster, jump higher, lift more weight, have a stronger core, improve grip, lose/gain weight the deadlift is indeed very ?functional?

Stokey
 

jable1066

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Stokey sums it all up very nicely as per!

I do a lot of strength training aside circuit training. Training generally comprises of 3-4 lifts; the bench press, strict military press *standing*, squat and deadlift. Deadlifts aren't done too often because they really tax your CNS and when you go heavy they're quite hard to recover from, often meaning running or something gets impaired for a few days!

Instead of doing the popular body part splits, I do movement splits with assistance work. The assistance work is done in circuits or with very little rest to keep my heart rate up. I finish a lot of sessions with tabata style hill sprints or biking. An average week looks like this:

Day 1: Bench press and military press assistance
Day 2: Squat and pulling/power cleans
Day 3: Military press and bench assistance
Day 4: Max effort squats (alternate weekly front squats and back squats) and deadlifts (alternate with trap bar and straight bar).

Assistance work includes weighted ab work (leg raises, sit ups etc), an absolute ton of pull ups, chin ups, neutral grip pull ups... weighted dips, many varieties of rows, lunges, shrugs etc. Generally, whatever I feel like and I rotate them weekly if I see articles I like with new movements etc. Rep schemes and sets always differ depending on exercise and feel and often they're done as circuits to save time and serve as improving strength endurance!

Conditioning work is also very important too. Hill sprints, track sprints, weighted short sprints, stairs, sled work, HIIT. Tabata work is good and short too, so it's easy to throw in the end of sessions however beware, combining conditioning work like this after strength work will hinder your strength gains slightly (or so I've read). It's best to separate them by a few hours if possible, or separate days.

It's totally possible to be strong as a bear and very well conditioned. You're not going to be powerlifter strong though and be able to sprint like Bolt... But there is happy mediums that will benefit you when going into RT. As long as you're balanced in training i.e. some max strength, power strength, strength endurance, conditioning then you will be sorted. Often it just means tapering how your perform reps or the way you set up reps and set schemes.
 

X-Sleeman

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jable1066 - I really like the way you set out your training. I'm just curious do you normally do the compound movement first and then once completed do a circuit of the assistance work? Also I know you stated that you change your set/rep schemes - but do you usually stick with 5 sets x 1-3/5 reps or sometimes will you go with 4/5 sets x 8 reps and so on.....
 

jable1066

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jable1066 - I really like the way you set out your training. I'm just curious do you normally do the compound movement first and then once completed do a circuit of the assistance work? Also I know you stated that you change your set/rep schemes - but do you usually stick with 5 sets x 1-3/5 reps or sometimes will you go with 4/5 sets x 8 reps and so on.....
Yeah man, the assistance work always comes after the main lift as the main lift is the focus of the session. Sets and reps for the main lift rarely differ: squats = 5x5, press = 5x5 (with as many as possible on the last set, maybe a few push press), bench = 5x5 (with as many on the last set), deadlift = 1x5, power clean 5x3, max effort front squat = 5x3, max effort back squat = 3x3. I use the max effort obviously to just go heavy as I can go safely.

As for how I perform reps I try and keep the pressing explosive and really push the weight as forcefully as I can instead of slowly grinding out reps. Think it keeps it in line with RM that way as the focus is power and not necessarily the maximum weight you can move. Though, sometimes I'll do a few sets heavy and finish off with 2-3 extra sets at low weight, maximum push as a bit of assistance.

With the assistance the reps and sets always differ - lately I've been doing high rep assistance work like 10-12 and up to 16 or 20 on the last set of something. I'm trying to build some more muscle though, so I'd tone this down if strength was my only goal.
 
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