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Hello all! I am in need of advice.

Discussion in 'Introductions & Welcome to the Royal Marines Site' started by Racoon, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    Hello,

    I am a 17 year student, currently in college about to finish my AS year. I am having difficulty in deciding which career path I should follow. I am unsure on whether I should join the Royal Marines or follow a path into Commercial Aviation becoming a pilot. If my eyesight suited the requirement, I would be trying to join the forces as a pilot, but unfortunately cannot.

    I am trying to weigh up the two options. I have been drawn to the idea of joining the marines for a few years now, but also have a passion for aviation. Both options have their pros and cons, however I am finding it difficult to choose between the two. Flying for a living is the financially better career, offering a very comfortable lifestyle and would possibly prove better for my family, and if I one day have a partner. From my limited experience, I figure my salary would be an important factor. However, I sometimes feel like the Royal Marines may be the better option despite all the quirks of becoming a pilot. I may have more pride in myself if I earned the coveted green beret, and having to spending the vast majority of my life working, makes it vital that I find my career choice interesting and enjoyable. The brotherhood nature of the marines and finding my limits seems appealing to me.

    Without doubt, joining the Royal Marines would require the greater physical and mental effort, but I am unsure whether it would be the more beneficial option. I do not want to get so far into a certain career only to realise it is provides me with less satisfaction than I expected and that I should of entered another career, providing a better lifestyle. I realise that I need to figure this out, as to make either possible I need to be starting to focus most my time and energy into one area. It is difficult to explain how torn I am between the options and all the factors I am trying to consider. My question is how do I make the decision?

    Thanks
     
  2. arny01

    arny01 Ex Pongo.

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    Go with your "gut" it's never wrong!!
     
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  3. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Do both.

    Join the RMR.
     
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  4. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    Okay. That sounds wise. Thank You. I have thought of possibly trying to join the RMR alongside the aviation route, but am unsure how that would work out, as for the aviation side of things you need to maintain your licenses by ensuring you keep up your hours. I will try and find out more information regarding that. But, I definitely have a bit of time to make a decision and applying for both routes would be a good way of doing so. I feel I would enjoy either route, but it is just finding the best one for me at the time. I am not sure where my gut instinct lies, but hopefully I will sometime soon.
     
  5. old-lynx-mech

    old-lynx-mech Valuable Contributor

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    Join the RM full time. Learn to fly privately in your own time. Build your hours and licence coverage yourself.
     
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  6. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    do both.

    Have 2 careers. 5 years or so as a bootneck, then crack on in aviation.

    You can have more than 1 career in your life.
     
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  7. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    That may be an idea. Although, I am not sure if that would be entirely possible. The route into commercial aviation I am looking at will result in me paying off a loan of at least £135,000, plus all the other expenses on top. But, if I were serve a few years in the Royal Marines it is highly unlikely I can enter through the same scheme. If I wanted to make a switch to commercial aviation a few years into my career, I would probably have to take a modular route to gain my licenses which is anywhere from £250,000 upwards. At that point I have no concept yet of how that could work whilst probably paying of a mortgage by that point and having an endless list of other expenses.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2017
  8. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    I already have a bit of experience flying, it is enjoyable but costly. It is difficult for me to understand the financial side of things at the moment due to my age and what is considered a major lack of experience in paying off mortgages, taxes and every other bill you can think of. That is my main concern with trying to get into commercial aviation. Money is a large part of it. I have a few friends in various stages of commercial pilot training with a few applying for next years cycle, through a company called CTC Aviation (the company I would be looking toward for attaining my licenses). Unfortunately, unlike them I am starting from a position of very little money, nor financial support. So pretty much most my spare time is taken by training and work. I could just gain my private pilots license, but would rather be able to fly as a career and see a return from my investment, rather than having an exceeding expensive hobby.

    There is a need if I want to enter the commercial aviation route, to get into the cycle straight after I leave college, as that is when everyone expects the next spike in demand for pilots to be (usually a 1-2 year period in which most airlines increase the amount of pilots they want to hire), so flight training schools take on more students, vastly increasing my chances in entering a already very difficult to enter career field. What usually happens is that the market becomes over saturated with new pilots; although still possible, it leaves it increasingly difficult for pilots to enter the cycle afterward for several years.

    All the people I know who are learning to fly privately in there spare time are either loaded, or are struggling to pay for their training. I know a guy in his 30's, who is still living with his parents as he cannot afford anything else other than his training; he is working 4 jobs and never seems to have a break from work. That is not really a position I would be happy with.
     
  9. benjamin1952

    benjamin1952 Well-Known Member

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    I think you need to sit down with your parents and take a long hard look
    at what you really want.
    You have to be 100% committed to do either.
    Make that decision and that's your way forward.
     
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  10. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Another factor to take into consideration is that of potentially locking oneself onto a commercial aviation career path from which it will be difficult to escape should you choose to do so in, say, ten or fifteen years' time.
     
  11. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Generally, those who find themselves significantly influenced by the financial implications of civilian employment are going to find themselves unable to afford a fulltime career in the Armed Forces. This is the reason most who wish to still have a military career, go for the Reserves option and achieve both without the financial disadvantages.

    The other thing people consider is joining as an RM Officer and becoming a pilot but whilst this has and still can be achieved, it is a statistically unlikely achievement which is high high risk & could result in neither career aspiration being achieved. I always liken the practicalities of joining as an RM Officer aiming to be a pilot a bit like walking out of your front door, wanting to reach the end of the street to your right, but turning left and taking the longer circumnavigational route.
     
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  12. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    I will do. However, the last time I tried that I realised my parents seemed relatively unsupportive of both careers. They seemed to feel that Royal Marines was too dangerous, but Commercial Aviation is too expensive to enter. I did take on there concerns and though about them for several months, but it hasn't really helped in any way and had just caused me to have more doubt.
     
  13. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    That is very true.
     
  14. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    Well, joining as an RM Officer and following the pilot specialisation is an appealing prospect, but does seem practically impossible; even more so for me as my eyesight doesn't meet the stated requirement. So if I were to join the RM, I would be looking towards other specialisations. Would you suggest looking to see how compatible commercial aviation and the RMR is?
     
  15. arny01

    arny01 Ex Pongo.

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    You have £135,000 worth of debt at 17???
     
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  16. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    That's pretty much what I'm attempting to convey, yes.
     
  17. old-lynx-mech

    old-lynx-mech Valuable Contributor

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    @Racoon
    There is some sponsorship available. Try the air league and guild of airline pilots.
    Join the air cadets and get a flying scolarship. This wont get you a PPL, but will start you on the road.
    It is possible to accrue the hours and knowledge as you go. There are avenues open to fast track once you have for example a PPL and perhaps an instrument rating or perhaps already hold multi- engine licence.
    Worth getting to know a local flying club and discuss with them.
    The situation isn't as black and white as you paint it.
    An old army friend of mine just built his hours and licence over a period of years, at weekends and during leave periods. He is now a training captain with BA.
     
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  18. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Another way to get a PPL free of charge is by joining the University Air Squadron (the RAF version of the URNU or OTC) whilst in uni.
     
  19. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    I would by 18-19 as at the time I would start acquiring the debt, if I entered the route of commercial aviation to attain my ATPL. Luckily you only have to pay it off once you are partnered with an airline and receiving a salary (providing you meet all the requirements to get to this stage, otherwise you are stuck with a load of debt, trying to find a job); with the company I would train through anyway.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 3, 2017
  20. Racoon

    Racoon Member

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    I was an air cadet for about 3 years and that is how got into flying. I now do a bit of gliding occasionally, but left the cadets as things like "flying scholarships" are practically impossible to get amongst other things. Plus, the gliders the air cadets once flew are all grounded due to some maintenance issue now. So I flew maybe twice in that time, probably about 30 minutes overall there. I will ask a few more people at various flying clubs; I am already talking to a few people who are in the know; but will try and find out more information on my options.