Help with Press ups and sit up.

Ski ii

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So would it be better to do press ups and sit ups everyday or only 4 times a week during circuits? Currently struggling as I'm not progressing anywhere from doing them everyday. As of now I'm stuck on 35 press ups to the bleep and 67 sit ups

And then test my self on the bleep test every week.
 

Curql

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Press ups and sit-ups you don’t really need to take a day off doing them, if they feel a bit fatigued though maybe you should or not do them on the weekend. For the press ups do tricep dips or any workout involving the tricep. With sit ups try doing sets of like 15 with a rest period or some core workouts if you aren’t already (sit ups without foot support are also harder if you aren’t doing it with any support yet so if you put any support on your feet you will bang a lot more)
 

Eastonpledge

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I do press ups 5/6 times a week, normally I do Sean lerwell 1 day then the next day I do a large amount 150+, or so then I’ll take a day off then, sit ups I do everyday unless I feel fatigued, my press ups have gone from barely being able to do 10 at the start of the year to now being able to do the VPJFT and is 35 to the bleep like yours, I have also worked on my hip flexors mobility for sit ups which has helped no end (53 to the bleep)
 

Biggles

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Second @Eastonpledge Sean Lerwill (type in google) is the man for this. His program ROP is great. Got my press ups from 30 to 60. Sit ups my weak area not hit more than 60 yet, but his 'gainers' principle is working well.

I only train Press Ups maximally once a week for a a RMFA test, the other sessions are sub maximal circuits as given to me by RMR London PTI.

Hope this helps.
 

HotelBravoMike

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Progressive overload is the key to increasing your max. Increasing your volume or using a weighted vest can really boost your press-ups, sit-ups and pull-ups. Gainers are an example of progressive overload, I’ve never personally given them a go but I’ve heard a lot of positive results in just a few weeks.

The other thing is practice. Practice with and without the beep and utilise planks and holding the press-ups position. This will develop your core strength and your quality of press-ups as a whole.

Another method is called greasing the groove. This can be done on your rest day, every time you go to the toilet or every 1-2 hours bash out 10 press-ups. My mrs is always making fun of me when I do this but it adds up throughout the day and acts like a recovery run.

As for the above regarding rest time, I completely disagree. Rest is equally important as the exercise itself. Giving yourself adequate rest for any specific muscle group and focussing on mobility and nutrition is going to boost your stats, avoid injury and allow you to work optimally. This doesn’t mean to say you can’t do press-ups on consecutive days, it depends on how close to maximal you’re previous session was, but a session where you’re only hitting 60 press-ups in several sets probably won’t cut the mustard as the stronger you get, the harder you have to work to improve. Chucking in a further few sets of your bodyweight exercises is a sure fire way of adding those reps that are going to overload your muscles.

The recipe is pretty simple and you have to trust the process. You’re not going to be hitting 60 press-ups in a matter of a few weeks but you will see an increase of 1-2 reps every week or so and it’s always a step in the right direction.

I’m no PTI but this has worked for me and others I’ve known to go through lynpstone and was what I was told when I first applied years back.
 

Biggles

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Second this - Greasing the groove works very well for press ups in particular.
 
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