Hill sprints

MillwallAlex

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So as a part of Arnys plan I'm doing hill sprints.

I have posted about this recent I think so I'm sorry if I'm getting on people's nerves:D

But what sort of hill should I be sprinting up to prepare me for bottom field and the endurance course?
As the hill I'm running is 0.15 miles (240 meters) is this too long should I focus on finding a shorter hill? As I'm not maintaining a full on sprint to the end.

Also it isn't ridiculously steep. Parts of it are quite steep but some parts of it aren't as it varies.

So should I find a hill or is this one good enough?
 

Caversham

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So as a part of Arnys plan I'm doing hill sprints.

I have posted about this recent I think so I'm sorry if I'm getting on people's nerves:D

But what sort of hill should I be sprinting up to prepare me for bottom field and the endurance course?
As the hill I'm running is 0.15 miles (240 meters) is this too long should I focus on finding a shorter hill? As I'm not maintaining a full on sprint to the end.

Also it isn't ridiculously steep. Parts of it are quite steep but some parts of it aren't as it varies.

So should I find a hill or is this one good enough?
KISS! Don't overcomplicate things.

The idea of a hill sprint is exactly that. You need a hill of any length and sprint up it. If you run out of legs and are blowing out your arse by the time you get to the top, then that's fine, you've achieved what you set out to do.

If you run out of legs half way up then take a note of where you wrap and then try to beat that mark next time out. If you run out of hill, then sprint faster, until you are once again blowing hard.

Once again, KISS!

Alan
 

arny01

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Are your legs screaming? Are your lungs screaming?

The hill is good. Stop worrying !!

As I've said before. Do 10 squats and 10 lunges after every effort .
 

Kangarooj

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Are your legs screaming? Are your lungs screaming?

The hill is good. Stop worrying !!

As I've said before. Do 10 squats and 10 lunges after every effort .
I was thinking about your hill sprint session on my run this morning and 20 sprints with 10 squats and lunges after each one sounds like an absolute killer! Starting a new plan next week, I might add it in there. ;)
Be a lovely start to the week at the crack of dawn-nailbiting-
 

MillwallAlex

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Are your legs screaming? Are your lungs screaming?

The hill is good. Stop worrying !!

As I've said before. Do 10 squats and 10 lunges after every effort .

It’s difficult and I do feel physically fatigued when I do it in my legs and in my lungs I do feel it quite a bit. It’s hard - but not unbearable, my legs aren’t screaming at me. They hurt but it isn’t impressive which is why I have these doubts as to whether it’s any good.
Reckon I’m *text deleted* stick with it for the time being

Interestingly I read something former Royal Marines Captain and PTI Sean Lerwill wrote on his website. He basically said hill sprints aren’t necessary to passing PRMC but on almost every PRMC diary they mention hill sprints and it’s in arnys plan.
His justification for this was that there aren’t any specific hill sprints parts on the PRMC apart from a few on bottom field and the endurance course.
What do you think of this?
 

arny01

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What do you think of this?
I think. And it's only an opinion. That leg endurance is key to passing a prmc. Im not or never have been a RMC so far from me to disagree with those that have achieved what I haven't.

The best way to get muscular endurance in the legs are hill sprints. Every single PRMC diary you see will have a common theme. Legs!! Legs!! And more legs.

It's entirely up to you how you prepare? But I'm all for. Minimum input. Maximum output. And for me hill sprints achieve this in bucket loads.
 

Bootra

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I've advised a fair few lads now on training for PRMC's. I always give them Arny's training plan to look at, and depending on their fitness level help them adjust it to what they need. One thing I always insist on are the hill sprints. Without fail, every single one of them has made massive improvements, and they all say that hill sprints were the biggest factor in this.
 

Caversham

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I'm not sure when that advice was wrote, but I would go out on a limb and say it's not relevant now. Leg strength is the key to passing PRMC. The "hill" that you will be sprinting up and down is on the bottom field and is a rise from the bottom where the assault course is to the top where the gym complex is.

Add in fatigue from the previous day, nerves, wet ground if it's been raining, plenty of "pays to be a winner", dragging your partner up there and then throw in a good workout on the assault course for a total of around 1.5 hours, then you'll realise where we're all coming from. Oh, then do it all again in the afternoon on the EC!

A read of all the diaries will tell you that so many candidates underestimate the bottom field and EC day and wish they had done more leg work. Also, have a look at all the videos and photos that are around and you can see the ground that you will be training on.

If your legs aren't screaming at the end of a session, either you're not working hard enough, or your legs are strong enough now, so there's only one way to find out and that's to go and do it!

Alan
 

Chelonian

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@MillwallAlex
Just to echo the comments above by people who really know their subject: hill sprints put real endurance strength into legs.

If the gradient of your particular hill is gentle adapt your routine. Faster, timed sprints between two points perhaps? Alternatively, do your hill sprints when your legs are at their most tired. If you have a training partner race each other.
 

Charlie13

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When I was training hills before PRMC I'd mix it up on a big long hill. For example 10 reps full length of hill jog back recovery, 8 reps half length of hill jog back recovery, 8 reps on the steepest section of the hill (shorter distance) walk back recovery. BY the end I was always hanging out!
 

MillwallAlex

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@Charlie13 @Chelonian @Caversham @Bootra @arny01
Thank you all very much. I'm definitely keeping hill sprints in my plan.
I think my hill is very long and steepish but I'll keep an eye out for a steeper one.
What sort of hills were you running up in terms of steepness like as steep as a staircase? Or is that ridiculous?

Also another quick question for @arny01 im moving on to 75% of your plan tomorrow with a 6 miler so far I've had no pain from my shins all and I can already feel the plan is making me fitter so thank you. But when I come to do the BFT on Monday, what would 75% of two BFTs be - a normal one and then a slow 1.5 mile which would be the same order as in the full plan. Or should I do two best efforts separated by a slow 1.5 in 12?
 

Chelonian

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What sort of hills were you running up in terms of steepness like as steep as a staircase? Or is that ridiculous?

Maybe you're over-thinking this? A slope as steep as a staircase would be a 50% gradient.
The gradient of the incline doesn't really matter. Adjust your pace until you reach the threshhold of pain. Once you reach that threshold, take a recovery jog to the bottom of the hill and repeat. :)

Anyone who truly has an aversion to running up steps could try this:
Find a high-rise stair well. Somewhere over about eight storeys high. Climb steps two-at-a-time at a rapid pace without stopping. Once at the top, return to the bottom and repeat. You'll know if you're doing it correctly when your legs feel like jelly.
 

westy

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I'm not sure when that advice was wrote, but I would go out on a limb and say it's not relevant now. Leg strength is the key to passing PRMC. The "hill" that you will be sprinting up and down is on the bottom field and is a rise from the bottom where the assault course is to the top where the gym complex is.

Add in fatigue from the previous day, nerves, wet ground if it's been raining, plenty of "pays to be a winner", dragging your partner up there and then throw in a good workout on the assault course for a total of around 1.5 hours, then you'll realise where we're all coming from. Oh, then do it all again in the afternoon on the EC!

A read of all the diaries will tell you that so many candidates underestimate the bottom field and EC day and wish they had done more leg work. Also, have a look at all the videos and photos that are around and you can see the ground that you will be training on.

If your legs aren't screaming at the end of a session, either you're not working hard enough, or your legs are strong enough now, so there's only one way to find out and that's to go and do it!

Alan

Here is the blog from Sean Lerwill that’s been spoke about

http://www.seanlerwill.com/prmc-are-hill-sprints-essential/
 

MillwallAlex

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Just do one until you get under 9:30 then progress to 2.

I got 9:17 return minus the 10-15 seconds or so it takes to get it out my pocket, unlock it, and click finish workout on that Endomondo app.
 

MillwallAlex

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Maybe you're over-thinking this? A slope as steep as a staircase would be a 50% gradient.
The gradient of the incline doesn't really matter. Adjust your pace until you reach the threshhold of pain. Once you reach that threshold, take a recovery jog to the bottom of the hill and repeat. :)

Anyone who truly has an aversion to running up steps could try this:
Find a high-rise stair well. Somewhere over about eight storeys high. Climb steps two-at-a-time at a rapid pace without stopping. Once at the top, return to the bottom and repeat. You'll know if you're doing it correctly when your legs feel like jelly.

Yeah your right I am probably over thinking this. I overthink a lot to be fair:D
 

Chelonian

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Here is the blog from Sean Lerwill that’s been spoke about

Mr Lerwill's summary from the blog page:

"To summarise, hill sprints are an effective training tool. If you can add them into your training they will certainly help improve your cardiovascular fitness and make you more functional at moving up hill quicker, which may well help improve you overall PRMC chances."
 

westy

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Mr Lerwill's summary from the blog page:

"To summarise, hill sprints are an effective training tool. If you can add them into your training they will certainly help improve your cardiovascular fitness and make you more functional at moving up hill quicker, which may well help improve you overall PRMC chances."

That’s why I posted the link, I’m a big fan of Sean Lerwill
 

Caversham

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Here is the blog from Sean Lerwill that’s been spoke about
http://www.seanlerwill.com/prmc-are-hill-sprints-essential/
Sean is a respected former RM and knows more about getting fit than I ever will, but maybe I'm being picky, but if you look closely at what is written he does advocate hill sprints, but essentially says not to worry about them if you don't have a hill near you.

My italics:

Apart from a couple of areas on the endurance course, assault course and any warm-up drills of the bottom field element of the course, there are no real “hill sprint” elements to the PRMC. Having said that, each PRMC instructor has their own methods and there are always hills/mounds around for use if necessary.

He is perfectly correct when he says that there are no real hill sprint elements, but let me say that Devon does not do flat. The area of the bottom field that you will be working on is flat around the assault course area, but rises for around 20 metres. This is what you will be running up and down, dragging your partner up, crawling up, and then running up again when you do "pays to be a winner". This session goes on for a good 90 minutes.

The PRMC is an ever changing beast and although it follows a format, a lot does depend on the DS that will be taking you through the day's activities. Also a read of the diaries of those who attended and they consistently write that they either run out of legs on the bottom field and had to withdraw or were withdrawn. And also those who passed, when asked what they wish they had done more of, generally reply that they wished they had done more leg work.

My advice for those who live in cities and have no hills near you, such as London should use what they do have plenty of, and that is high rise blocks, all with staircases and as @Chelonian has previously stated, they are a superb aid to training. Run up a couple of flights of those a few times and see how your legs are then

I have attached a photo of the bottom field which is taken from then top of the rise. As you can see it's not very steep, but run up and down that a few times as I have described and it will take its toll on your legs.
download.jpg

So it's your call! Good luck!

Alan
 
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