How does training change you?

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
Hi guys

Just wanting to know how the 36 week course changes you, in terms of being a soldier?

I love the idea of joining the RM, the physical and mental challenge of doing one of the hardest courses in the world, the adventure, excitement and variety, as well as travelling the world.

I'm 22, so feel as if I'm a bit more mature now, and I'm about 95% certain I want to do this, but the 5% doubt has come in from watching videos from ex Royal Marines. They've all said they loved what they did, but they wish they appreciated the risk of death before joining, rather than once they lost one of their oppos or own life. I feel like I'm at the point where if I had to go into war or conflict, I would, but I dont feel like I'm one of these people who actively wishes for war, and actively wishes to get shot at.

So what I'm really asking is, does training "break you down" and build you up, to the point where you want to go to war, and want to see conflict, as obviously you want to use the skills you spent 36 weeks training for?

Thanks for any help!
 

Vine

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Jan 31, 2015
Posts
514
Reaction score
381
Hi guys

Just wanting to know how the 36 week course changes you, in terms of being a soldier?

I love the idea of joining the RM, the physical and mental challenge of doing one of the hardest courses in the world, the adventure, excitement and variety, as well as travelling the world.

I'm 22, so feel as if I'm a bit more mature now, and I'm about 95% certain I want to do this, but the 5% doubt has come in from watching videos from ex Royal Marines. They've all said they loved what they did, but they wish they appreciated the risk of death before joining, rather than once they lost one of their oppos or own life. I feel like I'm at the point where if I had to go into war or conflict, I would, but I dont feel like I'm one of these people who actively wishes for war, and actively wishes to get shot at.

So what I'm really asking is, does training "break you down" and build you up, to the point where you want to go to war, and want to see conflict, as obviously you want to use the skills you spent 36 weeks training for?

Thanks for any help

As far as it goes you’ll be among the best soldiers around and with any military training you’ll be broken down and built back up doesn’t mean you’ll be some emotionless killing machine but the lads I’ve spoken to said that after training they did want to deploy. You’re unlikely to be deployed to a conflict zone anytime soon but at the end of the day you’re signing up for frontline, sharp end soldiering and if anything kicks off you’re expected to be first in which can happen at any point. Why do you want to join ? Is it the career ? A specific trade ? Is it purely to be a marine ? You can’t let others opinions of there careers make your mind up one guy can have served a full career and say it was the best thing he’s ever done and another doing minimum return of service and hating it.
 
Last edited:

Advocado

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Mar 4, 2018
Posts
220
Reaction score
528
Everyone in the corps, myself included, are absolutely itching to get out the door on ops, even those who got more than their fair share of TELIC and HERRICK tours want us to go on operations again.

This does not mean to say that everyone who joins the corps is a war mongerer who wants the world to go to tatters and for new conflict to arise.

The truth is mate, the world is in a horrendous state at the moment, far worse than what it was 10 years ago when the arab spring erupted. A bit of current affairs studying will open your eyes as to how many countries are facing insurgencies, civil wars and government collapse resulting in terrorist groups absolutely thriving and growing exponentially. This has knock on effects such as famine and millions of people being displaced.

We want to be out there involved in these conflicts and putting an end to the extremist groups causing them. Any bootneck would take a deployment to North Africa, the Levant or Yemen instantly.

Ask yourself this question, if you had the choice between the two following careers:

A career in the Royal Marines where you encounter several kinetic operational deployments across the globe

Or

A career where you do all the training exercises and all the trips such as the jungle, norway, the gulf of Oman, america, gibraltar but you never operationally deploy.

What career would you choose? If it's the latter then you should not join.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,034
Reaction score
7,628
Everyone in the corps, myself included, are absolutely itching to get out the door on ops, even those who got more than their fair share of TELIC and HERRICK tours want us to go on operations again.

This does not mean to say that everyone who joins the corps is a war mongerer who wants the world to go to tatters and for new conflict to arise.

The truth is mate, the world is in a horrendous state at the moment, far worse than what it was 10 years ago when the arab spring erupted. A bit of current affairs studying will open your eyes as to how many countries are facing insurgencies, civil wars and government collapse resulting in terrorist groups absolutely thriving and growing exponentially. This has knock on effects such as famine and millions of people being displaced.

We want to be out there involved in these conflicts and putting an end to the extremist groups causing them. Any bootneck would take a deployment to North Africa, the Levant or Yemen instantly.

Ask yourself this question, if you had the choice between the two following careers:

A career in the Royal Marines where you encounter several kinetic operational deployments across the globe

Or

A career where you do all the training exercises and all the trips such as the jungle, norway, the gulf of Oman, america, gibraltar but you never operationally deploy.

What career would you choose? If it's the latter then you should not join.

This is pretty much spot on. It’s not so much about training turning you into an emotionless sociopath. It’s more about wanting to get on with a job for what you train for.

You are constantly training and learning new skills, and you want to put them to the test. Making a difference and an impact. You don’t just stop learning and training after Recruit Training. You are always hammering out training to improve.

It’s just a job that needs to be done. You will get a lecture on the “realities of war” during training that tries to hammer home just that. There’s always a few people that suddenly realise it’s not just playing soldiers.

Remember that it’s not always “war fighting” involved in operations, the tasks can vary.
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,442
Reaction score
14,116
So what I'm really asking is, does training "break you down" and build you up, to the point where you want to go to war, and want to see conflict, as obviously you want to use the skills you spent 36 weeks training for?
My own RT was over forty years ago and not at CTCRM but I'll make a general observation.

The notion of "break you down" is misleading. For sure one's mindset must be adjusted. This begins with the foundation weeks or 'initial militarisation'. It truly is the foundation upon which all other skills will stand.

Personalities are not 'broken'. At a unit you will discover many uniquely individual personalities. :)
Once one has learned to conform during RT the world is your lobster.

Many discover that precision, attention to detail and integrity are sound values to carry through life in contrast to sloppy, vague, selfish, civilian attitudes.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
As far as it goes you’ll be among the best soldiers around and with any military training you’ll be broken down and built back up doesn’t mean you’ll be some emotionless killing machine but the lads I’ve spoken to said that after training they did want to deploy. You’re unlikely to be deployed to a conflict zone anytime soon but at the end of the day you’re signing up for frontline, sharp end soldiering and if anything kicks off you’re expected to be first in which can happen at any point. Why do you want to join ? Is it the career ? A specific trade ? Is it purely to be a marine ? You can’t let others opinions of there careers make your mind up one guy can have served a full career and say it was the best thing he’s ever done and another doing minimum return of service and hating it.
Yeah this all makes perfect sense. I want to join because I want the challenge of it, I guess its the reason most people join, to prove to themselves that they can complete and do something incredibly difficult.

I can't imagine myself being in for like 20 years and working my way up. I think I'd like to do 5-7 years and get my fix of adventure, travel, excitement etc. And then move on to other goals I have. But like others have said, I'd hate to speak to someone who served in say Afghan and Iraq, and they ask what I've done as a RM, and all I can say is training in Gibraltar and Norway.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
Everyone in the corps, myself included, are absolutely itching to get out the door on ops, even those who got more than their fair share of TELIC and HERRICK tours want us to go on operations again.

This does not mean to say that everyone who joins the corps is a war mongerer who wants the world to go to tatters and for new conflict to arise.

The truth is mate, the world is in a horrendous state at the moment, far worse than what it was 10 years ago when the arab spring erupted. A bit of current affairs studying will open your eyes as to how many countries are facing insurgencies, civil wars and government collapse resulting in terrorist groups absolutely thriving and growing exponentially. This has knock on effects such as famine and millions of people being displaced.

We want to be out there involved in these conflicts and putting an end to the extremist groups causing them. Any bootneck would take a deployment to North Africa, the Levant or Yemen instantly.

Ask yourself this question, if you had the choice between the two following careers:

A career in the Royal Marines where you encounter several kinetic operational deployments across the globe

Or

A career where you do all the training exercises and all the trips such as the jungle, norway, the gulf of Oman, america, gibraltar but you never operationally deploy.

What career would you choose? If it's the latter then you should not join.
Yeah I completely get what you mean.

If I had spent all that time training and working on my skills, I would want to put them to use and help fight against the people like you say, insurgents, terrorist groups etc.

And like I said in my previous reply, I would hate to speak to anyone who served in previous conflicts and only be able to tell them all I did was training in Norway and Belize.

I guess the way they're going with the FCF, unless something big suddenly breaks out, we won't have soldiers who all typically served in one place in their career, e.g. early to mid 2000s soldiers will have all been in Iraq or Afghan. Whereas over the next few years you might see Marines who some have served in Yemen, some in Levant, some in Somalia, on smaller operations, rather than 6 -8 month Afghan deployments, or am I thinking about thst in the wrong way?
 

Rob20

Royal Marines Commando Moderator
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Posts
2,163
Reaction score
2,914
I certainly don't put up with the down sides of the job for no reason. I want Ops. There are plenty of other options I could explore if I wanted money or geographical stability, but like most bootnecks I certainly haven't ticked all the boxes I wanted too.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
I certainly don't put up with the down sides of the job for no reason. I want Ops. There are plenty of other options I could explore if I wanted money or geographical stability, but like most bootnecks I certainly haven't ticked all the boxes I wanted too.
What would you say the downsides are?

So are you staying in the RM longer than you initially planned to hopefully tick those boxes, or do you think you'll get to the point where you're sick of waiting and leave for more money amd geographical stability?
 

Rob20

Royal Marines Commando Moderator
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Posts
2,163
Reaction score
2,914
As with all jobs there are downsides. Being in my late 20s and not being able to go home for the weekend until another adult has looked at my pit space is particularly irritating at times.

My initial plan when joining was probably to do 6-8 years. However now I will regret leaving having not got on Ops or atleast done everything in my power to increase the chances of getting that. Im relatively happy in my current draft but I reckon in the next few years I'll be looking for a step up. Alot of marines now have adopted the "badge or chit" mentality. Perhaps common during 'peacetimes' when things are abit quieter. But things change as you get older. I have a missus and financial responsibilities, and hopefully will have a few kids in the next few years, leaving a stable job with an annual pay rise and promotion prospects probably wouldn't be the wisest option. Certainly in the current climate.

Be flexible, because no doubt the plan you have in your mind when applying will completely change as time goes on.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
As with all jobs there are downsides. Being in my late 20s and not being able to go home for the weekend until another adult has looked at my pit space is particularly irritating at times.

My initial plan when joining was probably to do 6-8 years. However now I will regret leaving having not got on Ops or atleast done everything in my power to increase the chances of getting that. Im relatively happy in my current draft but I reckon in the next few years I'll be looking for a step up. Alot of marines now have adopted the "badge or chit" mentality. Perhaps common during 'peacetimes' when things are abit quieter. But things change as you get older. I have a missus and financial responsibilities, and hopefully will have a few kids in the next few years, leaving a stable job with an annual pay rise and promotion prospects probably wouldn't be the wisest option. Certainly in the current climate.

Be flexible, because no doubt the plan you have in your mind when applying will completely change as time goes on.
When you say another adult checks your pit space, are you referring to during training, or is that something that continues even once you complete training?

Yeah I get what you mean, frustrating when you join and want to live up to the guys before you, Iraq, Afghan etc. What does badge or chit mean?

Yeah plans always change. My other goal is that I really want to move and live abroad, so would obviously do that after a few years of serving. Just not sure whether to spend those extra few years in the RM (obviously dependant on passing training). But like you say, I wouldn't like to spend all those years regretting not being able to go on ops and use the training you've had.

So are there certain marines who haven't been able to go on any ops at all/not seen any combat whatsoever, even if its just short term ops? Not sure if it sounds a bit naive, but like based off the TV adverts, where they're on missions raiding camps etc. I know that's not the same as 8 months in Afghan, but does that not satisfy some people, temporarily?
 

Rob20

Royal Marines Commando Moderator
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Posts
2,163
Reaction score
2,914
Badge or chit means going on selection for SF and probably leaving the Corps if unsuccessful. Its just abit of a saying more than an accurate representation. But alot of lads accept the only guarantee of regular Ops at the minute is being part of UKSF.
 

OddPikeFromCrimsonCity.

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Posts
154
Reaction score
231
Badge or chit means going on selection for SF and probably leaving the Corps if unsuccessful. Its just abit of a saying more than an accurate representation. But alot of lads accept the only guarantee of regular Ops at the minute is being part of UKSF.
Do you think that in the future there will be ops?
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
Badge or chit means going on selection for SF and probably leaving the Corps if unsuccessful. Its just abit of a saying more than an accurate representation. But alot of lads accept the only guarantee of regular Ops at the minute is being part of UKSF.
Ah okay yeah I understand. Would you say there is almost an annoyance (I don't want to say disrespect, as I assume all marines have a respect for anyone who gets into the corps?) with people who are RM now? Like if a RM served for 6-8 years, but didn't really get on any ops, do you think other people and other ex RM would have the same respect for them, as RM who served in places like Afghan and Iraq?
 

Rob20

Royal Marines Commando Moderator
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Posts
2,163
Reaction score
2,914
Ah okay yeah I understand. Would you say there is almost an annoyance (I don't want to say disrespect, as I assume all marines have a respect for anyone who gets into the corps?) with people who are RM now? Like if a RM served for 6-8 years, but didn't really get on any ops, do you think other people and other ex RM would have the same respect for them, as RM who served in places like Afghan and Iraq?

You'd have to ask them. I joined after afghan. I have to say it does bother me abit at times and I wouldn't personally put myself on the same level as them.

However, I dont think they think as themselves as better than anyone. Humility on their part I guess. Good blokes will pass their experience on, not big time about it and rub it in your face.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
You'd have to ask them. I joined after afghan. I have to say it does bother me abit at times and I wouldn't personally put myself on the same level as them.

However, I dont think they think as themselves as better than anyone. Humility on their part I guess. Good blokes will pass their experience on, not big time about it and rub it in your face.
Yeah true, I can imagine it must be frustrating.

I'm not sure if its personal or not, but how many live ops have you managed to go on, or have you just been limited to training exercises? (I'm not sure if I've got the right idea, but would short missions also be considered ops?)
 

Rob20

Royal Marines Commando Moderator
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Posts
2,163
Reaction score
2,914
Yeah true, I can imagine it must be frustrating.

I'm not sure if its personal or not, but how many live ops have you managed to go on, or have you just been limited to training exercises? (I'm not sure if I've got the right idea, but would short missions also be considered ops?)

We would only consider Ops to be proper warfighting jobs. Although if you went by definition, there are many Ops going on worldwide. Op Ruman for example is a humanitarian job. Op Shader however is fightint ISIS.

Although try telling a bootneck you've been on Ops because you've done an STTT called Op Whatever wont bring much respect ha.

In terms of getting into a scrap, that's something that's evaded my career so far along with most young post herrick marines. Incredibly frustrating but it is what it is.
 

Brickhouse

Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2021
Posts
13
Reaction score
4
We would only consider Ops to be proper warfighting jobs. Although if you went by definition, there are many Ops going on worldwide. Op Ruman for example is a humanitarian job. Op Shader however is fightint ISIS.

Although try telling a bootneck you've been on Ops because you've done an STTT called Op Whatever wont bring much respect ha.

In terms of getting into a scrap, that's something that's evaded my career so far along with most young post herrick marines. Incredibly frustrating but it is what it is.
Ah right okay, makes sense. So with the future FCF, they might raid somewhere which could take a couple weeks or something, and that would still be technically an op, but not in the war fighting sense?

That must be very frustrating, I get why you say something in north Africa or somewhere is wanted now, just anything to scratch that itch right now I guess?
 

New Threads

Top