How far do i need to run?

Echo29

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Posts
28
Reaction score
8
Alright guys, i’ll try explain this as simply as possible.
Let’s hypothetically say i confidently pass both the PJFT and PRMC with good scores.

But i can’t run long, or any further than 3 miles.

Question is, do i need to be able to before i were to start RT, or is that something they would gradually help build up once i do start training?
 

12Will12

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Nov 1, 2013
Posts
312
Reaction score
101
I’d say you’d want to be able to run 6 miles comfortably at a good 8 min mile pace before you start training. There are some things such as rope climbs and running with weight that RT gradually builds you up to, but to run long distance is something you have to have cracked before you turn up, as it essentially becomes the foundations of your fitness and those who haven’t prepared will quickly be caught out with the introduction of IMF
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
10,855
Reaction score
13,063
Question is, do i need to be able to before i were to start RT, or is that something they would gradually help build up once i do start training?

I didn't do my RT at CTCRM but forty years ago the mantra was "We'll get you fit when you get here." Those days are long past.

You really need to get strength and stamina into your legs. The good news is that there are training plans and advice on this forum which can point you in the right direction. But fundamentally you need to get your running shoes on and start building the miles. Best of luck.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,196
Reaction score
17,080
I think the question is a particularly good one and it emphasises the person posing it, is aware there's more to it than passing the BFT and PJFT.

As ever, it's the peripheral phys that catches many out on PRMC, all illustrated on the bottom field and endurance course fails.

I guess the danger, as ever, is declaring minimum pass/fail criteria because human nature for many is to target minimums rather than maximums.

This is probably best illustrated even in the "A grade" PRMC pass category - the lads know the points system and realise they achieve no more points or credit for reaching beyond the threshhold - not a criticism, just an observation.
 

Caversham

Former RM Commando, Moderator
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Posts
5,679
Reaction score
9,047
Alright guys, i’ll try explain this as simply as possible.
Let’s hypothetically say i confidently pass both the PJFT and PRMC with good scores.

But i can’t run long, or any further than 3 miles.

Question is, do i need to be able to before i were to start RT, or is that something they would gradually help build up once i do start training?
Sorry to be the one to bring you down to Planet Earth, but if you cannot run further than 3 miles at the moment then I will confidently say that you will not reach the start line of RT. The PJFT is a balls out 1.5 run x 2, so on that alone you will be at your maximum, so put in nerves and on a treadmill, you'll be struggling.

If you do wing the PJFT, then the PRMC will finish you off. Myself and others strongly advise being able to run up to 8 miles before attempting the PRMC. This will take into account a long session on the BF in the morning, which is all legs and cardio and then covers you for the afternoon on the EC, which is a 2.5 mile course, with loads of additional exercises thrown in plus the possibility of a 4 mile run back to CTC.

Taking all of that into account, with the addition of the first day's 1.5 return run, a bleep test, gym tests and swimming, do you really believe that you will be able to start RT with a 3 mile max under your belt?

As @Chelonian states, those days are long gone and the onus is on you to prove to the Corps that you are capable of completing RT. Have a look at the various fitness plans on here that will help you prepare you for the PRMC, such as @arny01's one.

Good luck

Alan
 

Imperator13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Posts
142
Reaction score
96
You should be able to go outside and run a 8 miler comfortably at around 56 minutes, I ran 8 miles in 54 prior to passing my PRMC first time I joined. It will make life much easier if you can run condfidently and run far comfortably.
 

DBenn01

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Aug 21, 2015
Posts
825
Reaction score
428
But i can’t run long, or any further than 3 miles.

Mate, first and foremost, remove the word "Can't" from your database up stairs. The Royal Marines don't deal in "Can't".

Replace it with the obvious one, "Can". Or the far more effective one, "Will". And if that fails you, replace that with, "Am". As in "I am running long." Running is absolutely in your head. Yeah you need to physically do it, but when your body fails and you still have miles to go, you need to be able to not stop for anything. If your mind thinks that you can't run long, then you can't, absolutely. Force your mind not to give up with positive thinking, and downright stubbornness.

Secondly, you need to run FAR more than what the PRMC says for its requirements. You have to consider every requirement as a minimum, and aim to shoot high above that. It's great to pass, but what they want to see, is how much farther you can go, not only after you can't, but after you don't need to.

So the answer to how far must you run? Farther, longer, absolutely harder.

Consider this, you are aware of the layout of the PRMC I assume. Just how much running is involved? Aside from the required tests. A hell of a lot more running. You need to be strong enough to take it. And that is not to mention the other physical elements!

Best of Luck, you Can do it.
 

Echo29

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Posts
28
Reaction score
8
Thanks for all the replies and advice. I can't express how much it all means to me. Glad i found this forum.

Anyway, i'm 18, in good shape, about 72kg. I certainly wouldn't consider myself unfit by any means. With regards to running, that seems to be my biggest hindrance. I can push through circuits, i can power through hill sprints and all sorts of intervals, but when it comes to running, not even far, i just hit a plateau. This is especially weird considering my physical status and lifestyle. Maybe it is all psychological. But anyway, the only time i have ever ran in my life, was when i first applied to the marines. So i'm a complete beginner. With that being said, would you say that with hard training, 6-8 months is enough to build my running from 1.5/2/3 miles to longer, 8/9/10 miles, at a good pace?
 

Echo29

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2018
Posts
28
Reaction score
8
Basically, is that time-frame sufficient enough to become PJFT, PRMC, and RT ready?
(I have gym tests under control and don't see that aspect of phys as an issue)
 

Imperator13

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 26, 2018
Posts
142
Reaction score
96
Basically, is that time-frame sufficient enough to become PJFT, PRMC, and RT ready?
(I have gym tests under control and don't see that aspect of phys as an issue)

Yes, you can ideally get ready for all of these within 3-4 months of training smart and specific.

With running mate it’s just consistency, don’t forget to warm up and cool down and stretch, mainly dynamic stretching (stretching with associated joint movement) I.e leg swings. Eventually it will just click. And yes, a lot of running is mental!
 

SixteenSixtyFour

Active Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2014
Posts
52
Reaction score
29
For me, the best way to build up running endurance when starting out was to never think about the return journey. I'd just run away from my flat for as far a distance as I could possibly go, until I knew I was at my absolute limit.

Once I was seeing stars and about to puke, I'd have a thirty second to one minute breather. Then it dawns on you that you have to run back. Voila, your three miles just turned into six, because frankly running home is a lot more fun than walking.
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
10,855
Reaction score
13,063
So i'm a complete beginner.

A running partner might be helpful. Preferably someone currently running at a higher standard than you are now so that you're always pushing your limits.

Also consider visiting your local athletic and running club. You'll get plenty of training encouragement and it's a good place to find running partners.

But neither of the above are requirements. Simply getting out on the road—whatever the weather—and putting in the miles will improve your performance significantly.
 

Caversham

Former RM Commando, Moderator
Joined
Mar 22, 2009
Posts
5,679
Reaction score
9,047
The one thing that I learnt from running was to simply get the miles in your legs. Don't worry about timings to start with, just do the miles on a regular basis. You will find that your pace and breathing will improve as the weeks go by until the only problem with distance will be the overall time that you have available to complete the activity.

For example, I would run most days during my lunch break, so within around 70 minutes that I had, I could comfortably get changed, stretch out, run 5 miles, stretch out and then shower and change all within that time. If I was on a late shift starting at midday, I could bang out 10 miles comfortably within the morning period after breakfast.

Just follow a training plan for a half marathon and I guarantee that within 3 months you will be running at a good place.

Alan
 

FuriousD

Member
Joined
May 13, 2015
Posts
18
Reaction score
16
To improve my running I signed up for a local half marathon and gave myself 3 months to train for it. I used the Aasics running app as it built a training program for the run and found that really helped.

Once you get started and especially with a good plan you can and will easily start clocking up the miles.
 

The Creature of the Night

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Oct 16, 2017
Posts
175
Reaction score
96
Basically, is that time-frame sufficient enough to become PJFT, PRMC, and RT ready?
(I have gym tests under control and don't see that aspect of phys as an issue)

Think the best advice, mate? Get out there and do endurance runs! Also? Don’t work to how any miles, initially, work to a timeframe. For example:

Sunday :
1 hour run at a steady pace (as fast as your body will allow) with no breaks

Monday:
30 minute run at maximum pace

Tuesday:
8x120y (100m in new money) intervals, at a 10mph pace

Wednesday:
Weight Bergen (15ibs) for 30 minutes

Thursday:
45 minute run at a comfortable pace

Friday:
3-miler best effort

Saturday:
Day off

That’s the regime I used, mate. Got me fit and both increased my endurance and speed. Key thing is? Don’t take Milligan into account initially. Build up the ability to be able to hold a pace over time then? Once you’re confident? Try and do, say, 8 miles in the hour. Key thing is? Don’t take a break when on your runs. Keep going, regardless of pace. Endurance running requires strong calves and also, a state of mind. Give yourself 12 weeks or so.

I’m training for the RMR (awaiting SC then medical as I was TMU) and have ensured my endurance is up to scratch. If I can do,it; so can you!

Best wishes:
The Creature of the Night
 
Similar threads



New Threads

Top