How much can the CNS handle [Stress]

VTomasi

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I found this very interesting article as I was looking into what is truly over-training and CNS (Central Nervous System) fatigue, as it gets thrown about a lot in relation to strength work.

In a very brief overview, it states that physical and mental CNS fatigue are separable and that mental state plays a significant role in the toll lifting takes on your body.

Effectively, in training, even if attempting 1RMs or pushing until failure, the stress on the CNS in minimal as the approach is generally comparatively relaxed (mental aspect). It is only in a competition setting, when there's that hint of 'fight or flight' nerves/stress, where true maximums are achieved, that the CNS will be truly impacted/fatigued.

What's more, there exist approaches that believe that, similar to the way we treat muscles, the CNS can be conditioned to train through fatigue and it is not the end of the world to keep pushing hard. This has long been argued against, but there exists no science to back it up, and the question posed is, 'why not?'

There is it, though I'd share my find. Needless to say, it is important to listen to one's body and not burn yourself out!

http://www.myosynthesis.com/cns-handle-stress
 

JMC

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Hmmmm interesting.

Good find VT, will read it fully tonight then post my thoughts.
 
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stokey_14

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I?ll read the article later VT, however I?ll throw some personal opinion out working from your description so far?

I personally believe there is a link between the two mental and physical sides of this, I personally notice it in a big way the day after a fight.

Now boxing at amateur I fight 3 x 2 min round (soon to be 4 x 2 or 3 x 3) this is very short high intensity work. Now in training I?ll do 2 hours worth of 2 min round on and off, spar, bags, pads, circuits, sprinting and sure I?ll be knackered after it all but come next day at worst I?ll have some standard DOM?s.

Now back to fight night, after only 6 minuets of effort I?ll find my self the next day waking up feeling exhausted, sore joints, generally needing a day off. Did I work harder during the fight? Maybe? but if so, only slightly, why the huge difference in fatigue? Lower volume, same/ close to the same intensity yet more fatigue?

My guess is as above it has to be the fight or flight and stress placed on my CNS.

Some of the most interesting CNS based training lies in Oly lifting. These athletes will often spend hours a day in 2-3 sessions working only a small handful of lifts all near maximal loads.

Choosing to learn the skill of strength in a well recovered fresh state. Makes sense as this is the best time to learn any skill? you wouldn?t try to learn how to do hand stand push ups after a hard over head press session etc

Interesting stuff . Cheers Vito

Stokey
 

Ross154

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Now back to fight night, after only 6 minuets of effort I?ll find my self the next day waking up feeling exhausted, sore joints, generally needing a day off. Did I work harder during the fight? Maybe? but if so, only slightly, why the huge difference in fatigue?
Because you lost, that's why. The other guy beat you to a pulp, which would account for the soreness etc :kult:
 
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stokey_14

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Because you lost, that's why. The other guy beat you to a pulp, which would account for the soreness etc :kult:


haha Yes getting hit in the face often adds to soreness.

That said my sparing partners come stable mates often dish out far worse beatings than anything I?ve received on fight night.

Stokey
 
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