How to get rid of Lympstone Blues/ Nerves

WDS2827

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Alright Gents,

Been a long time since I posted here. I'll start from the top, I'm currently in training but on Easter leave. I'll be returning soon however I must admit I'm feeling this gut wrenching feeling in my stomach. I know this sounds wet as and I feel mega bone feeling nervous because I know there's nothing to be worried about. But the catch is before Easter leave I had torn a tendon behind the knee and I'm going straight into Hunter when I return, so I'm going straight into a new troop, new team and totally new faces. It feels like starting from day 1 again. Now I love a challenge and that's how I'm seeing it, just another chapter of the long book that is Recruit Training so to speak, but it's p*ssing me off that I'm feeling like this because I know I want this badly and I shouldn't feel like I don't want to return. My question is how do I get rid of this feeling in my gut because I know its bull* and it's just my mind playing tricks?!
I know I want to go back but I just need to get rid so I can enjoy the rest of my leave with my Fiancé.

Just to be very clear, wrapping is NOT on my mind! I just want to get rid of this feeling in my stomach so I can crack on when I get back without dripping for 2 weeks *text deleted*. It's not fair on the other lads to have 'that guy' sulking in the corner of the grots bringing everyone else down.

Cheers gents. Any advice to get rid of this would be really appreciated!
 

Biggles

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Nerves are normal mate, focus on the facts, emotions are often not reliable.

Remember: FEAR = False Evidence Appearing Real

Accept how you're feeling, embrace it, even crack a smile if you can.

Get your head down and WORK HARD, keep focused and motivated and remember be wary of the little voice in your head giving you doubts and worries. DO NOT LISTEN TO THAT VOICE.

YOU are in control of your thoughts and feelings. YOU choose whether you want to feel positive or shite. That is a conscious decision. DECIDE to be positive and enthusiastic, DECIDE to give it everything you've got.

We hold all the cards, we just need to be taught how to play.
 

WDS2827

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Nerves are normal mate, focus on the facts, emotions are often not reliable.

Remember: FEAR = False Evidence Appearing Real

Accept how you're feeling, embrace it, even crack a smile if you can.

Get your head down and WORK HARD, keep focused and motivated and remember be wary of the little voice in your head giving you doubts and worries. DO NOT LISTEN TO THAT VOICE.

YOU are in control of your thoughts and feelings. YOU choose whether you want to feel positive or shite. That is a conscious decision. DECIDE to be positive and enthusiastic, DECIDE to give it everything you've got.

We hold all the cards, we just need to be taught how to play.
Thanks a lot,

Genuinely helps having a second opinion and advice so i really appreciate it.

I'll get my head on straight, and remember I'm the one in control of my head.

Thanks again Biggles, and all the best!
 

Rob20

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Yer mate Lympstone blues are a stinker. You'll still get it at a unit following a decent leave period or leaving family for a deployment again.

Best way of dealing with it is to accept that it's normal, everyone will be feeling the same way I guarantee that. You're not different. Training is mega stressful and you're whole way of life is being changed from civvy to marine. Its no surprise that swapping between the two early on during your first few leave periods can mess with you abit.

I guarantee you this, all the things you do in your career, the thought of something is always worse than the actual reality of it. You'll be fine but the fact you feel this way shows you care. Cant ask for more than that mate
 

Chelonian

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It's not fair on the other lads to have 'that guy' sulking in the corner of the grots bringing everyone else down.
You've obviously seen others do this and you're aware of it so you won't be one of them.

It's tough waiting for something to happen. For example, an operational patrol. The mind dwells on all the 'what ifs', most of which won't happen.

When you're actually immersed in the job and cracking on with it the possibilities you endlessly contemplated subside because you're too busy doing the job.

On a broader note I'd suggest living in the moment just now. Enjoy your time at home.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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After 40 years in uniform, I still hit an all-time low at the end of a leave period, when faced with the prospect of returning to work.

Fact is, I love my job but the mind plays tricks, I guess and this isn't helped with the prospect or returning from leave as a recruit to revisit and repeat something you've already done, but this time with the potential for an injury to re-occur.

Generally, I find the journey back is the low point and the tip is to remember everyone feels pretty much the same. The thing to avoid is absorbing other people's negativity - stick with the recruits who are upbeat and positive, absorb it and stick with it.
 

fine

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I know a few really good lads in the troop you're going into; you'll make friends with them super quick for sure.
Lympstone blues sucks. Is there a way around it? I didn't find one. It helps though, knowing that mostly everyone else is feeling the same way.
My advice is to get to know the troop as quick as you can, and then you can share the burden together so to speak. Hunters moon is an exercise that'll bring you all together anyway!
 

Jaykay2343

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Didn't really have them from Easter leave but summer leave, oh dear god! During leave i had a holiday abroad with the missus and spent most of the my weekends catching up with family. Felt great to just lie in and sleep and do my own thing.

When leave ended, I Left home on the Sunday and it was sunny and warm. Arrived in Exeter and it was hoying it down, I've never felt so low in such a long time. As daft as it sounds , when I arrived into my block, the smell, the noise the doors made, the flicker of the lights, it was unbearable to be back!....but straight away we had to pack a Bergen to go on ex the next day... the next day arrived, doing all the usual pre stores admin for a field ex, before I knew it the blues had gone.

Once you get back into the swing of things and a routine, you will be fine and feeling better. Every Bootneck has experienced it at some point of their career. It's normal, it's part of the weeding out policy I would say.
 

WDS2827

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Thank you everyone for your replies.
I appreciate all of them. Good to know I'm not alone and I'm not just being a drip!!
Take care all, and thanks again!
 

stumpylegs

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I was going to say mate going into hunter after leave, know you don’t want to be there but as said before there’s lads preparing for exercise first day back, in hunter all you have to do is make sure your accom And lockers are squared away and before Covid you’d have gotten almost every weekend off. But be warned don’t get comfortable.
when I was in, hunter returned you to troop ahead of the curve in terms of kit musters and locker admin along with better all round knowledge of acronyms and corp history.
 

Dutch88

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I’m feeling the Lymstone blues. Everyone does. You won’t be the only bloke in the grots feeling down.
Im glad I don’t have any opt out rights. Not that I would wrap if I could. But it sort of makes it easier.
I think the best advice above is to live in the moment. We’ve got pretty much three days of leave still. To enjoy and relax and be with family/ friends.
Just think what you would give for 3 days off with your family when you’re back at Lymstone.
And how stupid it would be to waste that entire time feeling sorry for yourself.
I try to remind myself of the sunscreen song by Baz Lurman. “Worrying is like trying to solve an algebra equation by chewing bubblegum”.
I know it’s easier said than done!
 

Former AE

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It hits everyone, I had it and as said so did a lot of others. It’s a case of cracking on, talking to your buddies and keeping your eye on the prize at the end, the moment you cross the line after the 30 miler will put all these doubts into the shade, remember the phrase “ You can’t crack me I’m a rubber duck “
 

paidtoraid220

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Can genuinely say Hunter was the best thing for my early progression as a soldier. Didn’t gel too well with my first troop and as a result was quite reluctant to be outwardly loud or confident, so I wouldn’t volunteer for a lot of stuff that had the potential for me to fail in front of blokes I wasn’t too friendly with and vice versa. Hunter completely removed that, went into my new troop feeling great, and my new troop were all round awesome blokes. But going into Hunter I felt exactly like you do right now. It will pass and only positives will result, that’s just the way it seems to end up always working!
 
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