Illiterate

Vine

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Looking for a bit of general advice for my brother. He's 14 now and I'm trying to get him to get into the military as a career path owe to the fact jobs wise in our area are zero and his school grades will be questionable at best. He basically can't read or write at all he's a good lad in general but anything written is a no go like spelling his own name is about as far as it goes same with numbers. Most likely get him into a role like driver or something as he's fine on the practical things but even then drivers have paperwork. Long story short would he be taken even though he's practically unable to read and write? Any guidance would be great. @Ninja_Stoker
 

Rob20

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Could I suggest trying to get the lad the help he needs or help him yourself rather than just accepting that nothing more than being a driver is obtainable?

He's 14, he needs educational help clearly. That should be priority for his sake rather than pigeon holing him into a career he may have no interest in
 

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Looking for a bit of general advice for my brother. He's 14 now...
It's possible that for a variety of reasons he disengaged from school a long time ago, regardless of his actual attendance record.

Even if he appears confident it's likely that somewhere along the line his self-worth has taken a big knock. The good news is that if he so chooses he can easily turn the situation around, catch up wiith his peers academically and even exceed them.

At age fourteen if he has a career goal to achieve this might be a significant motivator. This is crucial because your brother has to want to achieve the goal. Nobody else can persuade him.
 

Vine

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He's getting help he goes to a separate school for it. I'm not pigeon holing him either I'm purely curious if he would be accepted driver was just something I used on the basis of it being mainly a hands on job he's obviously not too sure on what options are and would be available. As far as careers go military offers a huge amount (I'm serving) and I've said about it too him what I'm doing etc and he seems pretty keen to go down that road so not me making his choices just looking to see if it's a option for him or if it's not or what the basic standard of literacy would be.
 

Vine

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It's possible that for a variety of reasons he disengaged from school a long time ago, regardless of his actual attendance record.

Even if he appears confident it's likely that somewhere along the line his self-worth has taken a big knock. The good news is that if he so chooses he can easily turn the situation around, catch up wiith his peers academically and even exceed them.

At age fourteen if he has a career goal to achieve this might be a significant motivator. This is crucial because your brother has to want to achieve the goal. Nobody else can persuade him.
Again he goes to a separate school and has done since he was like a kid. It's not a confidence thing it's a learning difficulty. Like dyslexia sort of thing again I'm not pushing him into anything he will make his own life choices but he seems keen and I'm only looking to find out a guideline on what the standards are
 

The guide

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To be honest if illiterate in the true sense then no he is not getting in! He requires at least level 2 functional skills ( Maths & English) or GCSEs at 3 and above to pass if he does not have these he will be required to sit the recruit test for which no assistance is available and you need to be able to read at the very least and in particular the comprehension part where interpreting a written sentence is required, All services have a variety on this test with maybe the Army having the lowest threshold for a pass.
 

Vine

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To be honest if illiterate in the true sense then no he is not getting in! He requires at least level 2 functional skills ( Maths & English) or GCSEs at 3 and above to pass if he does not have these he will be required to sit the recruit test for which no assistance is available and you need to be able to read at the very least and in particular the comprehension part where interpreting a written sentence is required, All services have a variety on this test with maybe the Army having the lowest threshold for a pass.
Seen much appreciated.
 

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In practical terms basic numeracy and literacy skills are essential for any branch of the Armed Forces for day to day routines such as reading written orders, briefings, bulletins, submitting pay and allowances claims, online training packages and two-way unit communications through emails, pamphlets and service publications and reference books.

Nowadays there are plenty of automated 'read out loud' digital applications and voice-activated AI devices and intelligent spreadsheets which will automatically calculate a variety of numerical data inputs however, as indicated above, the basic educational core skills are still a fundamental requirement.

Once this threshhold is met, the services will pretty much bend over backwards to help develop educational abilities for those with learning difficulties and the acquisition of recognised qualifications, but every individual needs to meet us half way by achieving at least the minimum standard for entry despite their personal circumstances, much the same as the majority of occupations in the job market.
 

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Appreciate that along the lines of what I was expecting to be fair just wanted to clarify
 

sharpe

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About 200 years ago when I was at school doing my O levels I had a massive problem with maths. I had to take a CSE which was a lesser equivalent and got a grade 3(bad) for the retake they allowed calculators and I got a grade 4(really bad!) to get into the police I needed that O level equivalent so my parents got me a great private teacher who made the subject fun and I finally “got it”. Bit anecdotal but as has been said above seek change rather than accept mediocrity, at 14 he’s got loads of time to turn things around
 

Vine

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About 200 years ago when I was at school doing my O levels I had a massive problem with maths. I had to take a CSE which was a lesser equivalent and got a grade 3(bad) for the retake they allowed calculators and I got a grade 4(really bad!) to get into the police I needed that O level equivalent so my parents got me a great private teacher who made the subject fun and I finally “got it”. Bit anecdotal but as has been said above seek change rather than accept mediocrity, at 14 he’s got loads of time to turn things around
He gets additional tutoring at school now it's not accepting "mediocrity" it's a learning difficulty he's been at this school now for years with I think one to one tutoring but definitely far smaller classes than your average school !! fair play to you for turning it around and getting the grades required but it's different. I know many lads who are mega with pen and paper but have zero common sense it's swings and roundabouts.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Looking for a bit of general advice for my brother. He's 14 now and I'm trying to get him to get into the military as a career path owe to the fact jobs wise in our area are zero and his school grades will be questionable at best. He basically can't read or write at all he's a good lad in general but anything written is a no go like spelling his own name is about as far as it goes same with numbers. Most likely get him into a role like driver or something as he's fine on the practical things but even then drivers have paperwork. Long story short would he be taken even though he's practically unable to read and write? Any guidance would be great. @Ninja_Stoker

Muscles
Are
Required
Intelligence
Not
Essential
 

Chelonian

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...but it's different.
Agreed. It's good to learn that your brother is receiving support. Getting support in place can be a major struggle.

As he's only aged fourteen hopefully vocational training options will open up in the next year or two.
 

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