I'm thinking of enlisting for the rmc but...

Nacnud

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My mum strongly disapproves of me joining any kind of armed forces. She thinks that you should only really join the army if you were underachieving in school and just not very bright.

Surely there must be some bright people enlisting... I can't believe that our freedom is being defended by a bunch of stupid lowlifes and underachievers.

I guess she must be scared of losing me, through death or injury, and i'll probably be away for long periods of time. She's also very antiwar, as far I know. I can sort of understand this though. When she was a little kid, she was exposed to the horrors of the vietnam war, she saw the napalm bombs and all that (she's vietnamese herself).

Also, she might be thinking that I'll be sent off to somewhere like Iraq just to invade and steal the oil.

What should I do... technically i'm not an adult yet, so i cant slap her in the face and say "im an adult, i can make my own choices for myself blah blah blah".
 

Seedytucker

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well firstly i wouldnt suggest you slap your old dear in the face ever! *text deleted*
my old dear doesn't want me to join either- she's a jehovah's witness and refused to sign the paperwork when i was 17 to join and has threatened to dis-own me now if i join. if it's what you want bide your time and train.
regards IQ levels of recruits, the aptitude requirements are a little higher for RM/RN, and given some of the technology required on today's battlefield if you're stupid you wont get in. for eg i've just dropped out of a degree in Psychology and neuroscience and have an IQ of 132, fair enough i'm not a genius, but i'm no dunce, as with most potential RMC/recruits etc
a friend of mine, although a great guy certainly is no einstein and failed RM aptitude test, though he passed army. the thing to remember is RM are an elite force. you're not training to be cannon fodder you're training to be the UK's premier fighting force and part of NATO's rapid response force. plus try chatting to some of the lads on here. although there are exceptions (you know who you are....*text deleted*) you'll see most of us are pretty bright
RMC aren't in iraq they're in afghanistan due to their mountain warfare expertise.
 

MrSkippy

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Aye, not many people are actually stupid in the armed forces, we aint a conscript force and pick people who meet required targets.
I dropped out of a computing degree personally, and think the armed forces is the direction I need to take in life.

View your mother has is one typical of people who havn't done any research into the forces, just show her what it's about, what you can gain and all the opportunities it presents and I think she'll accept the fact it's what you want to do.

But at the end of the day, if 18+ ... it's your choice.
 

Raz

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My mum strongly disapproves of me joining any kind of armed forces. She thinks that you should only really join the army if you were underachieving in school and just not very bright.

Surely there must be some bright people enlisting... I can't believe that our freedom is being defended by a bunch of stupid lowlifes and underachievers.

I guess she must be scared of losing me, through death or injury, and i'll probably be away for long periods of time. She's also very antiwar, as far I know. I can sort of understand this though. When she was a little kid, she was exposed to the horrors of the vietnam war, she saw the napalm bombs and all that (she's vietnamese herself).

Also, she might be thinking that I'll be sent off to somewhere like Iraq just to invade and steal the oil.

What should I do... technically i'm not an adult yet, so i cant slap her in the face and say "im an adult, i can make my own choices for myself blah blah blah".


The low IQ thing is bollocks mate, my family thought the same, that the armed forces are for underachievers and disagree with me joining, however its not true, i for example am joining the RMR and goign to study math at university, the RMR(as well as the regulars of course) is full of intelligent people from all walks of life, whether directors, salesmen, students or even school-leavers, it makes no difference, the fact is that we're all treated equally and thats the beauty of it. Infact the Royal Marines in particular is regarded as one of the bigges boys clubs in the world.


Plus if you had the qualifications and the ability, you could always be an officer, which do have to have good A-levels for.
 

Babybell

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plus try chatting to some of the lads on here. although there are exceptions (you know who you are....*text deleted*) you'll see most of us are pretty bright
.
I like to think I have some inteligence at my disposal. Not being able to spell in a forum does have some disadvantages though.

My parents arent against me joing the Royal Marines, I think they are concerend that I am joining for the wrong reasons.

Getting my mum to watch Commando on the Front line helped make my mum feel less concerend. Saying that she did serve in the RAF for 3 years so that probably helped my case too.
 

Nacnud

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Ok guys, thanks very much for the advice, I also thought the low IQ, not-so-bright-fail-at-academic-subjects thing was untrue. My mum is ok if i get good A levels and qualifications and what-have-you to become an engineer or even helicopter pilot (the type that drops soldiers in and out of combat, not the one that has a huge minigun on to provide air support).

The problem with being an engineer as that its probably too late to become one now, as none of my A levels have anything to do with engineering really.

Basically, she doesn't want me to fight and possibly lose me.

EDIT: and dont worry seedytucker, i wouldn't really slap my mum *text deleted*. What I meant was sort of wake her up *text deleted*.
 
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I have been studying this for a little while now and thought I should add my thoughts. It is understandable that given your mother's background, she is apprehensive about you joining the RM. However she must understand a few things before she writes off your career aspirations.
Firstly, although a number of people join the Corps without much of an education, that does not mean they are stupid. A Royal Marine is a thinking man's soldier and we are by no means gung ho in our approach. I think that if she looks a little deeper and finds out that we are not the USMC she may be surprised, hopefully even impressed.
I would always advise someone to get the best education possible in Civy Street before joining the Corps and given that you are heading towards A-Levels, you may want to consider the Officer route. Look at the website for more information.
Be aware that you are showing an interest in the Royal Marines Commandos. We are first and foremost a frontline infantry unit and you should be prepared to and want to see front line service in Afghanistan among other places. If that does not interest you (or your mother) then you must look elsewhere. All Commando trained ranks, Officers and Marines join to fight at the front.
Ultimately I would like to think that your mother wants you to be happy above all else and if that means having a crack at joining the RM, she needs to accept that.
 

Raz

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Joining any armed force carries risks really, you don't necessarily have to be in the infantry and i think if you're considering joining one you have to be aware of them, but you shouldn't let that deter you, its just like stepping out of your front door in the morning, anything could happen! but if your mentality is 'what if something happens' then you'll never really get anywhere, sometimes you just have to get out there.


If you explain to your mother thats its what you really want to do, i'm sure she'll understand, i remember explaining to my stubborn family that i wanted to join RMR, that didn't go down too well hahaha.



And no slapping her wont help, try the gentle approach, works every time:wink:
 
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Sotiris

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Your mom sounds like my dad...except he's Greek and has had no experience of war or the military so his opinions are totally ignorant and pig headed.

Basically no parent even wants to think about their son coming home in a box.

Perhaps it's best to explain to your mother that receiving some of the best training you can get from a civvy to soldier transition does help you out...however you will be sent to the front line so I guess your odds balance out hehe.

There's not much you can do to sway someone's opinion, expecially one rooted in a horrible experience like your mother's. Keep showing her documentaries, or throw some books at her (not literally). She may calm down in time.
 

FletchPRMC

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However she must understand a few things before she writes off your career aspirations.
I think that if she looks a little deeper and finds out that we are not the USMC she may be surprised, hopefully even impressed.
Ive found this to be true myself, especially with my Dad. When I told him I wanted to join he wasnt that impressed. However, upon further reading, and looking at the booklets/letters I bought back from the AFCO and CTC he has become increasingly more impressed and now dosn't feel the same way.
 

Nacnud

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yeah don't know if any of you heard, but on the news some time ago a royal marine jumped on top of a live grenade, saved his squad and didnt get injured in the process and was rewarded the george cross. This made my mum even more worried. In fact she worries 24/7 for me.

Arggghh get me a coffee...
 
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Yes, we did see that.
All I can really add is that you need to make your own mind up when you are old enough. If you don't go for it, you'll never know whether you could have become a Royal Marines Commando and could end up resenting her for not letting you make your own choices.
Tell her about the number of people that drop out or fail in training, that'll cheer her up.
 

Nacnud

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haha, not sure if giving her false hope in that I might drop out and fail is a good idea *text deleted*, but i'll tell her.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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One of the other things to consider is that ideally you want your family to support you through training- it helps immensely. There are very few parents, if they are honest, who do not worry about their children whatever they are up to. (I speak as a parent). If your Mum realises how well the Royal Marines are trained & how professional they are, she may be more supportive, so try to involve her in your interests- simply be honest & open.

If you are joining as an Officer, by the time you have 180 UCAS points at A level standard, you will most likely be 18 and able to join of your own volition without parental consent, however, you are strongly advised to try and gain family support no matter how old you are- they are instrumental in helping you pass training in the vast majority of cases and likewise can greatly hinder your successful completion of training if they do not support you.

Good luck.
 

Nacnud

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yes, thanks ninja, and RM recruiting officer, I cant imagine how sh.t i would feel if anyone of my parents resented my choice during training, I'd find the training pointless, and i might give up, because I want to maintain a close relationship with my mum, and ofcourse keep her happy.
 

Death-Oar-Glory

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You're in an identical situation to me. I'm going in as an officer which has cheered the annoying woman up no end, for a while, and then she got on my back about how few 180 UCAS points really are, so I literally turned around and told her to go find herself an RM Officer, and tell him he has a low intellect, and the corps is full of stupid people. She did actually talk to a couple of Marines, and I'm friends with an acting Captain in the marines, and basically, she has shut up about the intellect thing. She still doesn't back me, but my sisters and my dad do, because they know me better than she does, and they appreciate that it's something I need to do.

You're going to need to get over her basically. I couldn't care less if she backs me into training, because it has nothing to do with her. I'm doing this for myself, not my parents.

Saying all this though, I don't have a particularly loving relationship with the old hag, soooooo... Yours may be different.
 

Qwerty123

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Hi mate, i know where you're coming from.

I have wanted to join the Marines now for years, and after GCSE's and then after A-levels, i got pressured into continuing studying, with my parents constantly quizzing me on what job i am going to get at the end of it, and how i need a good degree to get a good job etc, and my dad constantly putting down the armed forces and highlighting all the soldiers dying in Iraq etc.

So i'm in the final year of some sh1te physics degree, don't like it and my parents have realized i'm not going to be the doctor in the family or whatever, but after i graduate i know my parents will be satisfied, and will then let me crack on with the life i want to live.

Whilst studying at uni, i have realized just how superficial a degree is, and how it proves nothing about your intelligence. There are a lot of weird people at university with no social skills, and no real intelligence. A degree just means that you know a lot about one topic, and you have the patience to stick with it.

A lot of squaddies are much more switched on and "with it" than university folk. Ok they don't have a million UCAS points but are more practical and that counts for a lot.

You have to remember that it is your chance at life, and you should do what makes you happy. Fare enough, if you avoid the armed forces for the rest of your life, and get some civvy job in a cotton wool factory, then great you may be well safe, and you probably won't die before your parents (which is allways tragic!) but what sort of a life have you really lived though?!

Whenever there is a newsc lip on tv now about a serviceman dying in Afghan or Iraq, i can hear my parents start tutting, and so i change the situation to "oh, what happened with that young doctor and her newly wed husband who were murdered on their honeymoon."
People are dying all the time just going about their buisiness in whatever walk of life.

Hopefully, when your parents are a bit more aware of who the Royal Marines are, and their proud history, they might be a bit more behind your decision.

My dad somehow found out recently that i was 100% serious on joining, and said to me "look, it's not what me and your mum would want you to do, but if thats what you really want to do, then we'll support you all the way."

Happy *text deleted* days, been wanting to hear that for a long time!

good luck mate
rant over
 

Ninja_Stoker

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My dad somehow found out recently that i was 100% serious on joining, and said to me "look, it's not what me and your mum would want you to do, but if thats what you really want to do, then we'll support you all the way."
Good news- this is exactly the support you need from your family- they don't have to agree with your choice (they will do if you pass training though-guaranteed they will be hugely proud of you) BUT, what you need is support of family/friends and/or partners from the outset-they will help you immensely.
 
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