Improving BFT Time

B11

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Okay got you, I was just thinking of any weighted compound work really like squat/deadlift/lunges etc., to build up leg strength. Did you focus on leg strengthening especially before RT or did that just come from the running you were doing? Cheers
No mate to be fair I didn’t lift weights before I joined, but those movements would definitely be good for leg strength. All mine came through running and bottom field type sessions with the afco. My focus was 1.5 returns, press ups, pull ups and sit ups.
 

J9R4W

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No mate to be fair I didn’t lift weights before I joined, but those movements would definitely be good for leg strength. All mine came through running and bottom field type sessions with the afco. My focus was 1.5 returns, press ups, pull ups and sit ups.
Okay cool. Final Q for you on that haha - Was it mostly roads you were running on during the week or did you mix up with grass/cross country also?
 

B11

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Okay cool. Final Q for you on that haha - Was it mostly roads you were running on during the week or did you mix up with grass/cross country also?
No worries mate happy to answer any questions about it all. All on the roads
 

Arctik

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So I've never been a fast runner and prefer longer distance stuff but I have found the following interval sessions really helpful and include them in my training once a week. Great for getting faster legs and less about building endurance.

SESSION 1
For this you need a ruby/football pitch or some other 100m distance eg running track.

  • Sprint 100m. Walk 100m
  • Sprint 200m. Walk 200m
  • Sprint 300m. Walk 300m
  • Sprint 400m. Walk 400m
  • Sprint 300m. Walk 300m
  • Sprint 200m. Walk 200m
  • Sprint 100m. Walk 100m

Nice and simple pyramid, Minimal kit, go flat out on the sprints, recover on the walk. Easy.



SESSION 2
This session you need to be able to track distance and time/speed. This is easy to do with a GPS watch. This could be done with a track and stopwatch. This may get a bit confusing bare with me.

Pick your goal time for the BFT. Workout the speed, for example if you want to run a 9:30 min BFT you need to hold a 3min 58s per km. This is the speed you will need to go on the RUN interval. All of these RUN intervals will add up to 2.4km (1.5 miles). The workout is as follows:

  • RUN 400m at desired speed (or as best you can)
  • JOG 2 mins
  • Repeat 6x (so that you have run a total of 2.4km at a 9:30 pace)

This is the basic session. The next time you do this session you either increases the RUN distance(reducing the reps e.g. 6x400m or 4x600m or 3x800m) , Reduce the JOG time or increases the pace. Or a combination of all 3. So over a few weeks a training your sessions might look like this:

Week 1: (RUN 400m @ 3:58/km. JOG 2 mins) x 6 (1 minute 35 seconds per 400m)
Week 2: (RUN 400m @ 3:58/km. JOG 1 mins) x 6
Week 3: (RUN 600m @ 3:58/km. JOG 1 mins) x 4
Week 4: (RUN 800m @ 3:58/km. JOG 2 mins) x 3
Week 5: (RUN 600m @ 3:30/km. JOG 1 mins) x 4
Week 6: (RUN 1200m @ 3:50/km. JOG 2 mins) x 2
Week 7: (RUN 2400m @ 3:50/km. JOG 0 mins) x 1

This is just an example. Find what works for you. I'm not an expert. This is my favourite session as there are 3 variables you can manipulate and gradually increase your speed. If your endurance is lacking, increase distance reduce rest . If its speed, shorter intervals faster pace.

These are just speed work and should be incorporated with longer steady state efforts. Works for me, might not work for you. Play around with it. Hope that all make sense, any questions let me know.
 

Biggles

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Hi mate, I'll throw in my 2 cents worth as a PT on civvie at and ex RAF PTI.

The best way to improve your 1.5 mile (2.41km) run is to train specifically for the 1.5 mile run.

All the above sessions are great at building up your speed, lactate threshold and endurance but they are not specific to the 1.5 miler. I would still do these session as they are great for endurance in the legs and overall CV fitness but allocate 1 x session per week for specific 1.5 miler training.

I've coached many recruits and had great success with the following method - note it does require a treadmill, hopefully you can access one in a few weeks when gyms are open again:

* You have identified the time you want to aim to complete the 1.5 miler (2.41km) in - 9min 30s. Next thing to do is work out what speed you need to run at to cover 1.5 miles in 9min 30s = a running speed of 15.3 kph or 3min 56s / km.

* Set the treadmill to manually enter distance you want to run for - select 2.6km and an incline of 2% and a speed of 15.3kph. Press start. Stand either side of the treadmill belt.

* By selecting a little further distance than you intend to run you give the treadmill time to get up to speed and inline. Once the treadmill is up to speed and incline you'll be ready to jump on and start running when the distance km countdown hits 2.4km.

* Aim to run for as long as you can at this speed and pace. If you only manage 7mins doesn't matter, next time aim to run for 7mins 15s and so on until you hit the 9min 30s and complete the distance.

* This is THE most effective way to improve your 1.5 mile run time. The aim of the session is to teach your body to run at a sustained pace for a specific duration. By doing this on a treadmill the machine ensures you run at the same constant pace for the duration.

* Then once outdoors you will not only have become fitter and better at running a 1.5 miler you will have also become familiar with what the pace you want to run at "feels like" and so will be better able to govern your pace accordingly.

Hope this helps.
 

Arctik

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Hi mate, I'll throw in my 2 cents worth as a PT on civvie at and ex RAF PTI.

The best way to improve your 1.5 mile (2.41km) run is to train specifically for the 1.5 mile run.

All the above sessions are great at building up your speed, lactate threshold and endurance but they are not specific to the 1.5 miler. I would still do these session as they are great for endurance in the legs and overall CV fitness but allocate 1 x session per week for specific 1.5 miler training.

I've coached many recruits and had great success with the following method - note it does require a treadmill, hopefully you can access one in a few weeks when gyms are open again:

* You have identified the time you want to aim to complete the 1.5 miler (2.41km) in - 9min 30s. Next thing to do is work out what speed you need to run at to cover 1.5 miles in 9min 30s = a running speed of 15.3 kph or 3min 56s / km.

* Set the treadmill to manually enter distance you want to run for - select 2.6km and an incline of 2% and a speed of 15.3kph. Press start. Stand either side of the treadmill belt.

* By selecting a little further distance than you intend to run you give the treadmill time to get up to speed and inline. Once the treadmill is up to speed and incline you'll be ready to jump on and start running when the distance km countdown hits 2.4km.

* Aim to run for as long as you can at this speed and pace. If you only manage 7mins doesn't matter, next time aim to run for 7mins 15s and so on until you hit the 9min 30s and complete the distance.

* This is THE most effective way to improve your 1.5 mile run time. The aim of the session is to teach your body to run at a sustained pace for a specific duration. By doing this on a treadmill the machine ensures you run at the same constant pace for the duration.

* Then once outdoors you will not only have become fitter and better at running a 1.5 miler you will have also become familiar with what the pace you want to run at "feels like" and so will be better able to govern your pace accordingly.

Hope this helps.


Thanks man,

Ill have to give that one a try when the gyms re open.
 

mace

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All great programmes! I have started reading Shane Benzie’s The lost art of running book that has been a real eye opener for me. We tend to forget that running is a skill. Just like doing any other movement it needs to be learned properly. Yes we think we can all run but are we actually running well? Our times might be improving but are they improving because our form has improved? Or is just because we getting accustomed to running hard and far? What if we could run less while focusing on purely on our form to be elastic and thus improving our running? This are some of the questions the book sheds some light on.
Worth a read and implementing the techniques I think.
He has some short videos about technique on FB.
 

Chelonian

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We tend to forget that running is a skill. Just like doing any other movement it needs to be learned properly.
True. As lockdown restrictions begin to ease if anyone lives near an athletics club take a look. Plenty of coaching and eager training partners who can help make incremental improvements count.
 

Arctik

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All great programmes! I have started reading Shane Benzie’s The lost art of running book that has been a real eye opener for me. We tend to forget that running is a skill. Just like doing any other movement it needs to be learned properly. Yes we think we can all run but are we actually running well? Our times might be improving but are they improving because our form has improved? Or is just because we getting accustomed to running hard and far? What if we could run less while focusing on purely on our form to be elastic and thus improving our running? This are some of the questions the book sheds some light on.
Worth a read and implementing the techniques I think.
He has some short videos about technique on FB.
Cheers, If you haven't yet read it "Born to run" by Christopher McDougall is a hoofing read.
 

mace

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Cheers, If you haven't yet read it "Born to run" by Christopher McDougall is a hoofing read.
On my list! Thank you!
In the meantime great episode to listen:
 

Ninjaman

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would it be A good idea to start arnys plan Ive seen people get good results from it or should I just stick to the stuff previously stated.
 
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