into the barracks?

lewiss

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oioi,

At the moment I'm toying with the idea of whether carrying on to doing my A-levels and join as an officer or not and join as the ranks.

Now i don't want lectures about how fantastic A-levels are etc or how i should join as an officer due to living space and pay.

I was just wandering what life amongst the men was like? Also after reading Steven peirce's "Amongst the marines", i was just wandering what kind of welcome guys get from everyone when they first turn up to the barracks?

(This will not have a huge effect on my decision)

thanks, Lewis.
 

RossRobObey

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D'you mean when Steve describes having to drink vokda fanta and vomit?
 

Mack15

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I think he means the first few days steve is in condor barracks in arbroath, if that is what you are talking about? Right?
 

lewiss

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no, i meen, what sort of welcome are you given by the rest of the guys?
in steves book, he got beeten up, and all the other new guys did...

i was wandering if it was the same now, or everywhere?
 

NicholasSkamballis

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I think the decision is totally up to you mate, I've got my a levels but i'm joining the marines as another rank. All because at the end of the day officer or not i will still be living my dream.
 

CommandoJ

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no, i meen, what sort of welcome are you given by the rest of the guys?
in steves book, he got beeten up, and all the other new guys did...

i was wandering if it was the same now, or everywhere?
i to am curious about this.
 

Creed

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What like bullied?
or beaten up in a friendly way?

if you get beaten up ( bullied) the bully or bullies well get kicked out of the corps they will not stand for bullying of any kind including verbal
 

Ninja_Stoker

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What like bullied?
or beaten up in a friendly way?

if you get beaten up ( bullied) the bully or bullies well get kicked out of the corps they will not stand for bullying of any kind including verbal
Correct. What happened or didn't happen 20 years ago is not relevant today.

ROYAL NAVY'S POLICY ON BULLYING AND HARASSMENT
 The Royal Navy & Royal Marines are committed to upholding the right of all personnel to work in an environment free from
intimidation, humiliation, harassment or abuse.
 This commitment is enshrined in the RN Diversity and Equality Policy and Strategy.
 Behaviour such as bullying or harassment is manifestly unfair, undermines confidence and reduces morale.
There is zero tolerance to bullying and harassment in the Royal Navy.
 Any allegation of discrimination, harassment, victimisation or bullying will be investigated and
disciplinary or administrative action taken where there is sufficient and reliable evidence.
 All individuals who are in a position of authority are to be aware that they are to (a) promote an
environment conducive to harmonious working, (b) become aware of any developing conflicts and take
positive action to ensure that these are resolved early, fairly and amicably, and (c) have the moral courage
to take firm action against any inappropriate behaviour.
 There are two avenues of redress open to Service personnel who believe that they have been the subject of
inappropriate behaviour such as bullying and harassment.
 The first is informal where the person approaches the alleged perpetrator directly - either in person, in
writing or via a third party. Often this solves the problem, as the perpetrator may not be aware that his/her
actions are causing distress.
 If such an approach is not suitable or its does not succeed, individuals can submit a formal complaint to
their Commanding Officer under the Royal Navy's laid down complaints procedures. It will then be
investigated immediately, impartially and thoroughly, with fairness and sensitivity to all parties involved,
and both the complainant and the alleged perpetrator will be kept informed throughout the process.
Assistance can also be provided by EO qualified personnel from the Special Investigations Branch.
 Where the complaint is upheld, a range of sanctions can be deployed, from an apology by the perpetrator
through to administrative or disciplinary action. The redress requested by the complainant will be taken
into account as well as the severity of the incident.
 Should the complaint not be upheld by the Commanding Officer, individuals can appeal and they have a
right for their case to be considered by a higher authority outside their ship/establishment; this process can
be progressed as far up as the Admiralty Board.
 Where the alleged incident of bullying or harassment is unlawful under the Sex Discrimination Act, Race
Relations Act, Employment Equality (Sexual Orientation) Regulations or the Employment Equality
(Religion or Belief) Regulations, complainants also have the right to submit their complaint to an
Employment Tribunal, at the same time that it is being considered through Service channels.
 Advice and support is available at any stage to both victims and alleged perpetrators from many sources.
There include the person's Divisional Officer, a chaplain, the ship/establishment Equal Opportunities
Adviser, legal advisers, the Naval Personal and Family Services organisation or the Confidential
Supportline.
 Divisional Officers provide a link between the Commanding Officer to the most junior sailor. They are
part of the Divisional system which is a personnel management system that provides a structure within a
ship/establishment to supervise, develop, and train the members of its company. Of note is that it is also the
means by which the welfare of personnel can be addressed and it is to a Divisional Officer that a rating will
turn if he/she has family, financial or work problems.
 All ships/establishments have an Equal Opportunities Adviser who is a commissioned officer
 All personnel are made aware of the Naval Service's policy on EO, including bullying and harassment,
and the complaints procedure by formal instruction from basic training through career and leadership
courses up to senior managers' awareness days specifically focussed on EO.
 The level of bullying and harassment in the RN and the effectiveness of its policy on these issues is
continuously monitored by means of routine and exit surveys, statistics from the Supportline and external
agencies together with performance indicators on recruiting, training and retention which are part of
management plans. Additionally, details of disciplinary offences, formal complaints and informal
complaints over discrimination, bullying and harassment are recorded and analysed.
 Surveys specifically ask personnel to indicate if they have experienced bullying, harassment or
discrimination, how they dealt with it, and, if they did nothing, why they made that decision.
 
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