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Is it inevitable that Scotland will leave the UK ?

Discussion in 'Current & Military Affairs Discussion Forum.' started by glos94, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. FuriousD

    FuriousD New Member

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    I think it is far too soon for another referendum. I voted Yes but accepted the No result. It defeats the purpose of having another referendum so soon. maybe in 10 - 15 years, but not in the immediate future.
     
  2. Mr D

    Mr D Well-Known Member

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    This for me as an outsider looking in is, The Yes camp's idea of democracy and a democratic process.

    100% agree.

    And why wouldn't he or anyone do that,don't we all do similar virtually every day in some form or another.
     
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  3. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    If he honestly believed that the no vote would win easily it wouldn't have happened think on that one we all would agree
     
  4. Old Man

    Old Man Ex-Matelot

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    Circumstances change, as do minds.

    If we simplify things to better grasp the principle, imagine 100 people. If a decision is arrived at that has a 98 to 2 majority, the 2 have to do a lot of convincing in order for a referendum to be worth holding. A 52/48 majority though, sees both arguments having merit, with only a few people needing to be convinced either way. A 'different' argument could hold power of decision in a very short space of time.

    So the arguments persist, one side or the other gaining the majority and hence, in my world, power of decision.

    The possibility exists of course, that an independent Scotland could wish to keep everything the same, except for the fact that it is they who've made the decision to do so, rather than London.
     
  5. Mr D

    Mr D Well-Known Member

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    Might be a bone Q, but Who would actually decide if and when there would be a second referendum.
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    I imagine they would have a vote on it :)
     
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  7. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Happy to be corrected but I think that it goes something like this:
    The Scotland Act 1998 made provision for referenda when agreed with the UK government. Devolved powers exist in the Scottish Parliament but it cannot unilaterally impose an independence referendum that has legal or constitutional credibility.

    A cynic could assume that a Labour UK government would never have granted the referendum that the Conservatives granted. A Labour government might not have directly refused to grant a referendum but it would have repeatedly 'kicked it into the long grass' simply because it had too much to lose as a party, as history has now proved.

    As an aside, the suggestion by some who supported the 'Yes' campaign that the people of Scotland were somehow duped or scared into voting 'No' in 2014 simply insults the intelligence of over half of Scotland's population.
     
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  8. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    As an aside, the suggestion by some who supported the 'Yes' campaign that the people of Scotland were somehow duped or scared into voting 'No' in 2014 simply insults the intelligence of over half of Scotland's population.[/QUOTE]
    Firstly the pound bearing in mind numerous countries use it Gibraltar etc and the fact it dropped in value the second the yes vote took the lead says Scotland would have kept using it or would have had that option. Second Scotland wouldn't have any military power and prone to being attacked would Britain sit and watch and give say Russia a key to there borders no they would use the might of our navy to defend the shores and that would of course go both ways it's only trident Scotland didn't want due to its location next to one of our biggest cities and Scotland hasn't exactly got a bad history in defending if your into that. No EU another scare story would that really have happened? Would we really have needed it? From the looks of it we would be better off out in the present climate. Bearing in mind there 3 of the biggest reasons for a no vote I would say yes there were many scared out of a yes vote.
     
  9. Mr D

    Mr D Well-Known Member

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    @Vine Post#23 dont understand bit of artistic editing I think there,rather like the SNP policies :D:D
     
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  10. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    I did a double take too. :)
     
  11. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    With respect, that is pure conjecture on your part.
    Just as it is pure conjecture on mine that the people of Scotland who voted 'No' did so as fully-informed adults with a firm grip on economic reality.
     
  12. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    End of the day mate nobody really knows how it would have went that's my views and unless there was a argument I thought was a fair point I doubt they will change.