Is practicing RM style sit ups everyday worth it.

dudley21

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Hello All (sorry if this is the wrong place I’m new)

I’m currently training for my PRMC which I’m hoping to book for around a year from this date once I finished my a levels and my acne has cleaned up!

So the other week I was seeing a physio for shin splints and told them about what I was training for. When they found out I was doing sit ups (Especially fixed foot ones) 5 days a week they told me to stop doing them immediately and focus on other core exercises as I was increasing my chances of a herniated disc tenfold!(which I believe is a 1-3 year recovery time before being able to re apply)

I’m currently training with Sean Lerwills pass the PRMC programme but I have been able to max out the sit up test for a few weeks now.

So am I just overthinking things and crack on with the sit ups or should I focus on other core exercises like half sits and leg raises, while testsing myself in the sit up test once every 2-4 weeks to make sure I’m still hitting max scores.

Thanks for your help
 

anon1234

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A guy called Professor Stuart McGill found that flexing/bending the spine too much can lead to disc herniating and bulges. So sit-ups, leaning over, rounding the back lifting weights, even in house work can all build up and lead to a herniation, (we're talking thousands of bending repetitions).

But equally you need to perform sit-ups for the RM (and later in training rope climbs), which requires flexing of the spine. So it is something to accept that you need to practice sit-ups/hanging leg raises.

So my view would be practice sit-ups 1-2 times per week, maybe in a circuit, or maybe do 1-3 sets of high reps or max out 1-2 sets. This way, you still train the sit-up, but you are saving your back from flexing/bending too much, ticking both points above. Seeing as you can max the test out, I would say maintain that ability, and to maintain means you don't need to train it as much! Maybe max the test out 1-2 times per week, and that is all your sit-up training..

Keep the sit-ups in because it is criteria! But practice them less often to help your back.
Use other exercises too, planks, side planks, flutter kicks, deadbugs, hollow body holds....
Look up 'hip hinging' too, this is the best form for protecting the spine when lifting in the gym or otherwise.

Hope this helps, as a PT/strength coach currently I've thought about McGill's work in combination with the RM quite a bit, and what I've mentioned are my thoughts/strategy. Essentially practice specifically what you need (to pass PRMC), but don't do it so much you get injured, use some other training methods, rest a couple days a week.

As you say you're a year out from PRMC, progress slowly (think ~5-10 % increases per week, and take some strategic rest weeks/days), take your time to get fit and stay injury free over the next year. Best of luck in both your school and application!
 

dudley21

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A guy called Professor Stuart McGill found that flexing/bending the spine too much can lead to disc herniating and bulges. So sit-ups, leaning over, rounding the back lifting weights, even in house work can all build up and lead to a herniation, (we're talking thousands of bending repetitions).

But equally you need to perform sit-ups for the RM (and later in training rope climbs), which requires flexing of the spine. So it is something to accept that you need to practice sit-ups/hanging leg raises.

So my view would be practice sit-ups 1-2 times per week, maybe in a circuit, or maybe do 1-3 sets of high reps or max out 1-2 sets. This way, you still train the sit-up, but you are saving your back from flexing/bending too much, ticking both points above. Seeing as you can max the test out, I would say maintain that ability, and to maintain means you don't need to train it as much! Maybe max the test out 1-2 times per week, and that is all your sit-up training..

Keep the sit-ups in because it is criteria! But practice them less often to help your back.
Use other exercises too, planks, side planks, flutter kicks, deadbugs, hollow body holds....
Look up 'hip hinging' too, this is the best form for protecting the spine when lifting in the gym or otherwise.

Hope this helps, as a PT/strength coach currently I've thought about McGill's work in combination with the RM quite a bit, and what I've mentioned are my thoughts/strategy. Essentially practice specifically what you need (to pass PRMC), but don't do it so much you get injured, use some other training methods, rest a couple days a week.

As you say you're a year out from PRMC, progress slowly (think ~5-10 % increases per week, and take some strategic rest weeks/days), take your time to get fit and stay injury free over the next year. Best of luck in both your school and application!
Thanks a lot for your response. I’m thinking of doing alternative ab exercises and then maxing out the test once a week to show i can still do it.
 
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