Joining Concerns

Waggz

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Posts
19
Reaction score
0
Ive wanted to join the royal marines since i was about 14 (17 now) and gained quite alot of information and was well up for it. Untill i started watching such programs as "Ross Kemp in Afghanistan" and "Andy Mcnabs Tour Of Duty" which are making me think twice about joining and putting alot of doubts in my mind of joining up.

I want to join but still unsure of what to do because i dont think i fully know what i would be getting myself into.
 

Seedytucker

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Posts
1,119
Reaction score
1
most of us here are civilians, none of us know fully what we're getting ourselves in for, but if you trust that you'll be trainined to deal with it and have the mettle to cope with it joining up (so i hear) will be one of the most rewarding jobs you can imagine.
 

Robbie Spice

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Posts
533
Reaction score
0
Well basically yeah there's a pretty good chance of you dying being at war and all.

Sure it's a possibility but for me it doesn't really matter, we're all going to die one day and if I was to live until I was 100 with regrets of not doing things then well that'd be in some ways worse than living a great life but maybe dying young.


I personally would rather regret doing something than regret not doing something.


can't really explain myself all that well, but sure you could end up all *text deleted**text deleted*ed up worse but I mean think about Britain at the moment. I started watching a programme last night about street weapons and in Glasgow 2 lads ran up behind another lad for no reason and stabbed him in the neck and ran off, the lads paralysed for life.

That's just purely random, so *text deleted**text deleted* can happen anytime, a drunk driver could hti you, you could slip in the shower, I guess what I'm trying to say is .. I'd rather go for it because I know I'll be so proud and amazed and jsut a different person with the green beret and I know it'll be awesome and I think it's worth the risk of dying.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,047
Reaction score
16,684
Ive wanted to join the royal marines since i was about 14 (17 now) and gained quite alot of information and was well up for it. Untill i started watching such programs as "Ross Kemp in Afghanistan" and "Andy Mcnabs Tour Of Duty" which are making me think twice about joining and putting alot of doubts in my mind of joining up.

I want to join but still unsure of what to do because i dont think i fully know what i would be getting myself into.
You would be very wise to seriously consider the implications of joinining the Armed Forces at this point in time as the likelihood of serving in an operational theatre, is certain.

Whilst you could potentially be joining as one of the best-trained soldiers in the World, that does not guarantee infallability. There is no glamour in war and many people find the physical & mental stresses of serving in areas of conflict profoundly affect them for the rest of their lives. There is no shame in this & different people react differently.

At risk of sounding "Uncle Albert", having served on active service during the Falklands conflict experiencing first hand the horrors & terrors of conflict, and indeed the "buzz", there is no way of telling whether you are equipped to cope unless you actually experience it - a high risk strategy.

There is no definitive advice I could personally offer other than to say you will probably always wonder "what if?". Many of my friends said immediately after the Falklands conflict that they would have given a years' wage to have gone. Frankly, at the time it was all happening, I'd have settled for a cushy swap-draft for 50P. When I returned, a completely different person from the one that left, the euphoria of having got through it intact was worth millions to me in self-worth. My Mother & Father however, went through hell.

Needless to say we're all different.
 

Gidion

Member
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Posts
35
Reaction score
0
Once again, ninja pretty much sums it all up.

The way i deal with it is to think 'If i get shot and die, I'm not going to know about it, cause I'l be dead'

But then again, everyone is different...
 

Waggz

Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2008
Posts
19
Reaction score
0
i dont think im too bothered about being dead just feel sorry for my family and friends and feel a bit selfish about it
 

mrdanie

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Jun 18, 2008
Posts
151
Reaction score
0
Know what you mean, when i said i was considering going for the forces a few of my friends and gf werent too happy with the idea. My mum however thought it was a great idea, i think she wants to me to get a proper job/career.
Personally id be more worried about getting my legs blown off than being killed, or some other injury meaning i could no longer serve. Being killed on first day of service would suck too but then if your dead, your dead. The best thing is to not think about it, people die, but then so many people don't die aswell and live long and great careers.

Watching the Ross Kemp in Afghanistan made me want to join even more, only because of the pride and andrenaline the soldiers got from serving and from fighting. The thing that did get me was how sudden and random the deaths were, such as a the kid who was just sitting in the back of the car and got killed by a landmine or the guys who were hit by friendly fire, but yes it does happen. The best thing was how those guys all spoke highy of the Royal Marines :D, the marines saved the day a few times.
 
S

Sotiris

Guest
Waggz I can promise you that if you don't serve you will always wonder "what if". However, as Ninja has pointed out, if you are one of those unfortunates who can't cope then perhaps wondering is worth it. Hehe it's a tricky situation because the only way to find out....is it find out!

I have the same concerns as you do. Will I get shot, maimed, blinded, deafened, paralized..will I lose a close friend? But above all of those concerns my worries for my mother and father are the most significant.

What can we do? Sit behind our office desks encased in bubble wrap? Like Robbie says, *text deleted**text deleted* happens. And personally I would rather face the "slings and arrows of outrageous fortune" fully equipped and trained to "take up arms against a sea of troubles and by opposing end them"!

Hehe to increase the cheese, "death smiles at us all, and all a man can do is smile back" :smile1:.
 

jm745

Loafing Member
Joined
May 24, 2008
Posts
3,627
Reaction score
7
Mate I'm the same as you and I sometimes think about the dangers of being a Royal Marine,
but like everyone has said,
I couldn't go through my life and not join,
because I'd get old and hate the fact I didn't join when I had the chance,
no one knows how you will react when you're in combat,
some can hack it and do an outstanding job,
some can't and freeze and it just really affects them,
but like everyone has said,
no one knows if that will be you,
so you take the risk.

I don't want to die young,
and I also don't want to come home seriously injured,
but I've watched a lot of programmes on everything from soldiers who have died,
come back missing limbs,
and some with serious PTSD,
I've thought long and hard about it,
and I've decided it's what I want to do,
of course everyone is going to be a bit scared,
but at the end of the day,
it's upto you to make the decision of whether you want to do it or not.

Joe
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,047
Reaction score
16,684
I joined the Navy as a Stoker because my Dad said "you're not joining the Army because you will go to Northern Ireland" (the 'troubles’ were still very much at the forefront of the news).

Fourteen months after I joining in my "safe job" I had spent only 9 weeks on my first ship HMS Argonaut, and was 8,000 miles from home, in the thick of the Falklands Conflict, having seen several of my mates seriously injured, a couple killed & had experienced the disconcerting effect of having two 1000 pound aerial bombs smash into the ship, one of them only 5 metres from where I was cowering. Thankfully "my bomb" failed to explode as it entered the anti-aircraft magazine, but detonated several missiles and shells killing the guys in the compartment, before setting fire to the ruptured diesel tanks that flooded the magazine. That little mess took ten days to make safe and recover the casualties whilst under daily air attack.

Be under no illusion, if you join the Royal Marines, you are going to be stepping into danger. Far rather you be the best trained to deal with it, if you do choose to join.

The Armed Forces aren't for everyone -
many apply but don't make the grade, the majority of the population simply don't apply.
 

ZZ

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Feb 5, 2008
Posts
736
Reaction score
0
not to sure if this has been mentioned, but on the subject of dying whilst in there, think about the royal marine who came back from a tour of afghan and then got ran over on his way home. in all due respect just try it, your probably worried about the danger they face, but think of it this way, you walk outside and 1000's of chunks of metal (cars) will zoom past you at an average of 30+ miles an hour which can kill you. you have no control over what that person will end up doing the car, same as you have no control over a round (bullet) flying about.

i personally think there is just as much chance of you getting killed walking down the road as there is in a battlefield, its just in a battle field its more in your face as your more aware of the danger, where as when your walking along the path your not as aware of the danger.

but you get used to it, thats why you will read books especially Sniper One, where they see the danger in what they are doing but it just doesn't phase them as much as it did at the start.
 

MrSkippy

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 10, 2008
Posts
874
Reaction score
0
I believe there is actually more of a chance dying in your average civvie day than in afgan right now, percentage wise anyway.
Just looking at the examples given and the recent killings in london. Nowhere is safe.
But as a soldier you have the chance to make a difference, no matter how big or small to the people we are trying to help in the countries we are deployed. Could you say you make an impact if you work in tesco? (sure as hell know I didnt haha)
 

Matt B

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Apr 18, 2008
Posts
1,129
Reaction score
2
Don't do it, saaaaave yourself, get a job in a Mosside Tesco if you want danger!
 
S

Sotiris

Guest
Well as a fact, there is a 1/10 chance that you will get killed as a British soldier in the Middle East today. I think in the Faulklands it was 1/25. The statistics today have never been so unfavourable for an English soldier.

Just some of the useful facts my mother likes to bombared me with as part of her "reality check" campain hehe.
 

Seedytucker

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 17, 2008
Posts
1,119
Reaction score
1
although no doubt true, it doesn't take into account what soldier/where you're deployed. if you look at the stats for RM i'm pretty sure the picture isn't so bleak.
plus that stat is an accumulated figure over a 5 year period.
 

Matt B

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Apr 18, 2008
Posts
1,129
Reaction score
2
Well as a fact, there is a 1/10 chance that you will get killed as a British soldier in the Middle East today. I think in the Faulklands it was 1/25. The statistics today have never been so unfavourable for an English soldier.

Just some of the useful facts my mother likes to bombared me with as part of her "reality check" campain hehe.
Im sorry but 1/10 is so unbeleivably far off! We have had around 120 deaths, according to your statistics that would mean we have only deployed 1,200 personnel over there in 5 years!
 

ste preece

Former RM
Joined
Mar 7, 2007
Posts
1,476
Reaction score
469
Nervous & Stats

Guys, its perfectly natural to feel nervous and uneasy about preparing to work in a job that is presently totally alien to you. However, you should leave stats to the newspapers as I'm pretty sure most forms of employment have rates of injuries and fatalities within their areas, but unlike the military arena their figures aren't highlighted on the daily national news or published all over the world in newspapers.

Cheers

Steve
 

Matt B

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Apr 18, 2008
Posts
1,129
Reaction score
2
Well however skewiff the stats are, what I have learned from this is that at least 1 Marine has died so screw this, I was told in the AFCO I'd never die because bullets bounce off marines.
 

MAXPAIN

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Mar 22, 2007
Posts
506
Reaction score
1
Thats US marines we on the other hand dodge them :)
 

Phoenix

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Aug 2, 2007
Posts
294
Reaction score
0
The other thing to consider is whilst we will undoubtedly serve in a hot zone we wont be going in as novices. We will have top class training to fall back on, I too worry but I take heart in the fact that I will have been trained to operate in such environments. We have no control over the curve balls life throws at us, we shouldnt think of them either until they happen. Everyday we learn and experience more and more shaping our characters and sharpening our will to do better, when that curve ball comes its our characters and who we are combined with top notch training that will get us through. As Rocky Balboa once said "Its not about how many punches you can take, its about how many you can take and still keep getting up" or words to that effect. Rocky maybe a film character but that quote is very true, you get knocked down from life but you must get back up and carry on learning from the experience. This is what will happen during RT, like war RT also changes you its character building and its this that helps us through serving in war zones or humanitarian efforts.

Take heart also in the fact that our very own Ninja_Stoker has survived in the Navy for 27yrs. It really hit home when he wrote about that unexploded bomb landing near him. I think I can confidently say he survived due to luck, good upbrining and good training. I always like it when you post little snippets of your time in the Falklands or Navy experience. War is a personal experience its not always easy to talk about or recall, so thank you Ninja_Stoker. Also Ste Preece, he may not have served in any war zone, however he was in NI and ultimately he survived civvy street which can be as dangerous if not more so than some war zones *text deleted*.

Anyway thats my two pennth worth hope it helps.
 
Top