"Killer abs in 2 weeks" and other false promises.

jm745

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Without wishing to turn this thread into an episode of The Only Way is Essex, I've decided it's time to start thinking about the aesthetic side to all this exercise and get working on a plan to ensure I'm only a pair of red trunks away from starring in Baywatch.

I realise the main issue is diet, any general tips without being too strict as my evening meals are cooked for me and can't really be controlled? How about this carb back loading I've been hearing about? My diet is pretty clean at the moment, though I have been eating a lot to try and gain a bit of muscle. I'm going to try and cut down on the beer intake too, though that's easier said than done.

And how about exercise? I don't own a bike and I have a Doctors appointment next week about what could be anything from shin splints to compartment syndrome so running is out of the question. AMRAPs? Tabata? Heavy lifting?

Otherwise I'll have to go pick up a copy of Men's Fitness...
 

maophia

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Men's health subscription....try Isubscribe.co.uk (possibly .com) it's good for anything like that!
 

VTomasi

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Men's health subscription....try Isubscribe.co.uk (possibly .com) it's good for anything like that!
Men's health is an awful magazine and an utter waste of money. It is basically a men's version of Cosmopolitan (perhaps as it is edited by the same publisher!)

Men's Fitness is a great magazine, with nothing but training and nutrition tips from cover to cover.
 

maophia

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its a good lunch time read for a few days or so and i pay ?2 a issue. but you not wrong the couple of mens fitness i have read are better!
 

jable1066

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Diet is the single biggest contributor to aesthetics. You can't outrain a bad diet unfortunately. Unless you're already shredded then whatever training you do will aid your goals. However lay off the long slow distance running in favor of HIIT and sprinting and it should speed things up.

Essentially most people just need to eat a little cleaner. When you wake up your insulin sensitivity is high and so is your cortisol. By having big carby breakfasts, cereal etc. you totally ruin the fat burning state. Forget breakfast like a king. If you can't ditch breakfast altogether (I actually mean postpone till you've gone without eating for 12-14 hours) then have something high fat and high protein. Bacon and eggs...

Try and avoid eating carbs before training and if you have to eat them afterward. On rest days don't eat any carbs at all if you can manage it. If not, just save them for the night time when your hormones are a bit more balanced and your body can better cope with them.

Another option is just portion control. Eat smaller portions and do a calorie deficit. It's been done for years and works to a point. For some people it works well, for others it doesn't. It's flawed, but it could be what works for your body... who knows.

The easiest way to ditch weight is to just go low carb. That doesn't mean low calorie though. Your fats have to be HIGH if you're going to ditch all carbs because you will need it for energy. It's a total myth that it makes you weak and lacking energy. It does initially, but when your body learns to burn fat for fuel you're laughing. You start feeling weak etc when fat is too low. Forget 90g a day... It's more like 200 with equal quantity protein. 200g fat and 200g protein = 2600kcal (although kcals mean nothing).
 
S

stokey_14

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Training wise heavy compounds.

For hypertrophy people will rightly tell you to hit the 6-12 range however I believe getting strong should be your first port of call if you want to look good.

Keep reps between 1-5 until your lifts are good and solid. This way when you switch to hypertrophy ranges you?ll be able to use enough weight to cause some serious damage and thus improvements.

I?d make and exception to this rule for squatting. Nothing will add lean muscle like high rep squatting. You can also use a decent load with this movement anyways.

As said cut the long distance running and get sprinting. Short sharp conditioning circuits would be a nice substitute if the sprints flare your shins up.

Finally I?d personally end one or two strength workout a week with some sort of carry. Pick up a heavy rock, sandbag, barbell or dumbbells and maul the round for a bit.

Depending on what you do it?ll tax the core, grip, traps, make you strong as an ox and help with burning a little extra off at the end. Not necessarily a physique tip but a bad ass way to finish your workout non the less.

Stokey
 

Hopefulfutureroyalmarine

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Do you reckon most recruits develop 6 packs and God bodys' after training from all the *text deleted**text deleted**text deleted**text deleted*s and general intense fitness?
 

Jbc

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Do you reckon most recruits develop 6 packs and God bodys' after training from all the *text deleted**text deleted**text deleted**text deleted*s and general intense fitness?
No. A 6 pack is a sign of a strict diet not being an athlete. During basic training your only dietary concern is eating as many calories as is possible. Body-comp, paleo, carb-cycling, intermittent fasting do not apply.

Only thing that we did do during test-week was 'carb loading' I.e last meal day before a test have huge portions of carbohydrate rich food. Other than that - you will spend 75% of your time at CTC in the field. Diet isn't an option.
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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During basic training your only dietary concern is eating as many calories as is possible.
Only thing that we did do during test-week was 'carb loading' I.e last meal day before a test have huge portions of carbohydrate rich food. Other than that - you will spend 75% of your time at CTC in the field. Diet isn't an option.
Jbc, do recruits still tend to choose one option over the other in the interests of performance? e.g. replacing chips with pasta and rice, or is it very much a "scoff down as much as whatever possible" mentality?

Obviously in the field you eat whatever's in the ratpacks and that's it.
 
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