Knee Pains (Seemingly Random)

lankpost

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When my dad used to be in the army, he came out with really bad knees so bad he can't walk properly. I thought this might happen to me, because of genetics maybe. So I started to work out my knees more and more and eventually they started to hurt. I looked up some stuff and a few sites said that it could be due to over use, so I took a long rest. Sometimes I still get similar pains but I don't know why, even if I haven't exercised in a few days.

I wonder if I just need to keep working on my knees, not too much.
 

DamianK

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When my dad used to be in the army, he came out with really bad knees so bad he can't walk properly. I thought this might happen to me, because of genetics maybe. So I started to work out my knees more and more and eventually they started to hurt. I looked up some stuff and a few sites said that it could be due to over use, so I took a long rest. Sometimes I still get similar pains but I don't know why, even if I haven't exercised in a few days.

I wonder if I just need to keep working on my knees, not too much.
I had the same issue over working my knees not giving my body time to rest give your self some time off I've been using tiger balm and its been helping me ease the pain you don't have to work out every day *text deleted* you'll burn your selfout and slowly get back into it
 

lankpost

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I had the same issue over working my knees not giving my body time to rest give your self some time off I've been using tiger balm and its been helping me ease the pain you don't have to work out every day *text deleted* you'll burn your selfout and slowly get back into it
Yeah, I do tend to want to exercise every day *text deleted* it feels like I am not progressing. How long should I rest? 1 day, 2, or does it depend on how long/intense my exercise was?
 

Johnny_Anonie

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How exactly are you “working out” your knees?!

Probably time for a bit of common sense here. This doesn’t seem “random” to me. Odds are this isn’t a genetic issue and is simply overuse. If you are experiencing pain then you need to adjust and treat your symptoms so you can train pain free.

Without knowing your full circumstances this could be anything from Patellar tendonitis to a torn meniscus. Regardless, your first step is to reduce any inflammation and do not continue with any exercise that is causing you pain. Apply a cold compress to the area and take anti inflammatories if required.Continue to stretch and strengthen your gluteal, hamstrings, quads and calves which will assist you with stability. If you are continuing to experience pain after a few weeks then seek professional assistance. There is a difference between a normal training niggle and an injury. Be sensible, address your symptoms and do not continue to break yourself.
 

Johnny_Anonie

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Please don't do this. This is outdated in sports medicine.
I attached a very short paper on this subject.
Screen-Shot-2019-04-25-at-2.58.47-PM.png

The NHS states otherwise which, of course, is backed by The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance. NICE continues to state that regular full dosage NSAIDs have both a lasting analgesic and an anti-inflammatory effect which makes them particularly useful for the treatment of continuous or regular pain associated with inflammation. I checked the NHS website to ensure I wasn’t giving out dangerous or outdated information and thankfully I am not. NHS still recommends PRICE.

However as a former medic with vast experience in primary health care I am acutely aware that treatment plans evolve over time. It’s something I loved about the job to be honest. It is always great to learn something new and improve on treatments.
However as it stands now I’d be more inclined to follow the advice of the NHS on this.
 

DamianK

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Yeah, I do tend to want to exercise every day *text deleted* it feels like I am not progressing. How long should I rest? 1 day, 2, or does it depend on how long/intense my exercise was?
I'd give it a week or two and then see if it's any better you know I know it's a long time but it's better than making this worse.
I'm curious as to how specifically you 'worked out' your knees.
Running is a big one if you're running none stop not resting properly and just keep going when you haven't got to the stage of your body being used to running it can cause a lot of damage
 

Johnny_Anonie

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Further- I also am not having a go and appreciate that the BMJ have published articles on the potentially harmful effects on optimal tissue repair. However at current, the NHS seemingly has not adopted PEACE & LOVE. This is why healthcare professionals engage in continuous professional development. Healthcare is constantly evolving but it is also important that we place our trust in the clinical advice by the NHS.

I’m actually under the care of an orthopedic surgeon myself for a knee injury and I’ve personally been prescribed Naproxen. My advice for anyone is to follow the advice of the professionals.
 

Chelonian

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Running is a big one if you're running none stop not resting properly and just keep going when you haven't got to the stage of your body being used to running it can cause a lot of damage
Agreed. I attempted to deny this truth until I reached the age of fifty-five and realised that belting out silly mileage daily was counterproductive.

Rest is not heresy. And knees are complex, amazing and worth preserving. Looked after properly they should last a lifetime. :)
 

Johnny_Anonie

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The NHS guidance:

 

DamianK

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Agreed. I attempted to deny this truth until I reached the age of fifty-five and realised that belting out silly mileage daily was counterproductive.

Rest is not heresy. And knees are complex, amazing and worth preserving. Looked after properly they should last a lifetime. :)
Couldn't agree with you anymore than that
 

mace

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The NHS guidance:

Open the "sprains and strains" link. :) Hopefully, the NHS will catch up but I understand in the current pandemic they have better things to do.
"Page last reviewed: 12 January 2018
Next review due: 12 January 2021"

At least they mentioned this:
"But you should not take ibuprofen for 48 hours after your injury as it may slow down healing."
 

Johnny_Anonie

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Open the "sprains and strains" link. :) Hopefully, the NHS will catch up but I understand in the current pandemic they have better things to do.
"Page last reviewed: 12 January 2018
Next review due: 12 January 2021"

At least they mentioned this:
"But you should not take ibuprofen for 48 hours after your injury as it may slow down healing."
Absolutely and it’s important we follow the advice of those in the know.

Good information- thanks mace.
 

mace

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Ah, crap my earlier post disappeared. So here it goes again:
I can't argue with that if you were prescribed by a medical professional. However, the reason why I wanted to share what we were taught on a sports rehab uni course on optimised soft-tissue rehab is that I believe many people misuse these drugs. As a "foreigner" I was amazed by the general public's ease of access to these drugs in supermarkets especially when I worked in one for many years on the till. It's crazy how often people buy them (believe me they sell like candies...). I hypothesise that people use them too often at the earliest sensation of pain/discomfort. Now, I admit I have not looked into any studies on the consumption of these over the counter drugs to support this, so this is just my general observation. What I am trying to get across is in my opinion people tend to use them habitually instead of being prescribed by a professional like you. And I used to do that too. I used them, along with sports gels and also iced. Since I stopped using them many years ago, I do feel like I recover better after any niggles. So maybe it is worth a try next time you would reach for them automatically when you are a bit sore, and see if your body is working better managing the inflammation itself.
 

Johnny_Anonie

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I think the important take away here is to follow the advice of your doctor or healthcare professional. Whilst alternative treatments are developed and studies are ongoing the message needs to be to follow the advice of the NHS and not ignore it. I feel this is important to encourage here.

Whilst all healthcare professionals must continue to learn throughout their career and keep up to date in their areas of practice it is also important to note that strict guidelines govern how they work. Healthcare professionals must put patient safety first and make sure the care/treatment they provide is safe and effective. As I’ve been prescribed NSAIDs by a qualified doctor I’ll continue to take them as directed. The no NSAIDs for 48 hours makes sense though, I guess ideally you want that inflammatory response and blood flow to the area?

Essentially, my stance is simply - The NHS has a duty to offer advice, medicines or other treatment based on the best available evidence. They have a duty not to harm you. If they advise you follow a certain treatment plan then you really should follow it.

All this being said- This is why I loved my time as a military medic so much, primary health care is a fascinating and ever changing discipline. Trauma to a certain extent is pretty straight forward. I’ve applied tourniquets without having to think, merely following a mental flow chart of drills to keep a casualty alive. I actually found it much more interesting trying to follow a path to diagnosis. Asking probing questions and trying to get to the bottom of what is causing pain. Everyday is a school day but in summary- listen to the doctors.
 

Dutch88

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As has already been stated you can’t “work out” your knees. Simply because they aren’t muscles.
But you can protect them by building muscle around them with various exercises like squats as you suggested.

It’s the same with the whole body I think. Like the back. Building the muscle around vulnerable parts of our body definitely protects them.
By building the muscles around the knees you take some pressure off them.
But any form of exercise needs to be gradual and progressive. And done with the correct form. Or it will cause more problems.
A physio once described the knees to me as being poorly designed by evolution.
 
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