Latest Potential Officers Course (POC) Briefing notes

Discussion in 'POC Section' started by Ninja_Stoker, Feb 4, 2009.

  1. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    POTENTIAL OFFICERS COURSE (POC) BRIEF

    General

    1. Once you have received a letter from AIB informing you of the date of your POC, you should ensure that:

    a. You have seen the POC video.
    b. You have had the POC Medical. You will be sent a letter in due course, informing you that you should attend a medical conducted by a civilian GP under contract to the Navy, at your local AFCO, or in his surgery near the AFCO (check exact location before you go), on a certain date. This is a basic medical to ensure that you a medically fit to undergo the physical strain of the POC. If you are not, then recommendations will be made and you will have to comply with these before you attend the POC (which means you will have to have another medical to check). Your medical must be within 6 weeks of attending the POC. If you still have not heard from us regarding the medical 4 weeks before your POC is due, then please get in touch immediately (by phone).

    c. You have re-read this brief. There are several pieces of “Advice that are normally given out during a verbal brief. After that you will find “Frequently Asked Questions, a list of questions that candidates have asked in the past, some of which you may also have in mind to ask.

    d. You get in touch with your ACLO with any outstanding questions that you may have. There are no stupid questions (that have not been asked before!) and they are here to help.

    Advice

    2. Training Programme. Although the training programme in the POC booklet is 6 weeks, It's recommended that you give yourself as long as possible. The programme is a guide only. Being that way inclined, you are advised to maintain a fitness level around week 4, and then build it up gradually in the month or two before your POC. This way, when you go down there, you should be well beyond the recommended Week 6.

    3. Warm-up. You should ensure that you have given yourself a comprehensive warm up prior to commencing the Royal Marines Fitness Assessment (RMFA), as on the POC many are surprised by the amount of work they have to do before the test begins. You might go for a 3-mile run before your circuit.

    4. Exercises. At the end of the POC video, after a pause, you will see demonstrations on how to do each exercise correctly. Of note are pull-ups (arms fully extended, over arm grip, sit-ups (hands touching head at all times, knees together, head & elbows back to floor, elbows to knees), press-ups (arms shoulder width apart, chest down to 5cm off the ground, straight back). If you do these wrongly, the PTIs and Assessors will deduct points from your score. The bleeps are about a second apart. For press-ups and sit-ups you do one rep on each bleep. For pull-ups it is bleep up and hold, bleep down. Slow down your training reps to make it more realistic. If you are using a tape to practice in a gym, be aware that tapes can become distorted over time. We use a CD to ensure things are spot on. Do not be fooled by the pass marks you lose a lot of marks for not getting 100% on the test, but the rate of point deduction declines the lower you go. To ensure success make sure that you are far beyond week 6 of the recommended training programme in the back of the POC booklet.

    5. Endurance. Many train for the gym and forget the endurance part. Passing the RMFA allows you to commence the course. Doing well on the rest of the course is another matter. Endurance training is mainly running, but by getting your body to a level of upper body strength well beyond week 6 of the programme, your overall stamina will have improved. Running should be cross-country running wearing trainers and normal kit. Avoid gym running machines. Vary your route to include steep hills and some obstacles (gates, walls, streams), if possible. Vary your speed sprints followed by a steady climb, possibly stop for some press-ups or pull-ups if you pass a suitable place. All this will improve your stamina. In addition, any sports or activities endured for long periods of time will help develop this quality as will booted runs.

    6. Lecturette. 3 minutes long. Prepare well. Reherse (in front of people for comments). You will have a overhead projector, but no other equipment (although you might have a chalk board or marker board in the room (but bring your own chalk/pens)). By all means bring view folds and props, but bear in mind that the time taken using these will reduce the time of your verbal part of you presentation and could send you over time. One or two relevant view-folds would be enough, if you need it. Use notes well – do not read off a sheet as anyone can do that.
    Project your voice. Enthuse the audience.

    7. Attitude. Treat the POC as an acquaint visit as well as an assessment. Soak up the atmosphere. Most go home, having passed or failed, saying that they had a valuable experience. It may be that life in the Royal Marines is not for you and you might feel this during your POC. If that is the case then you would have benefited from the course. Most find that they have enjoyed being there and it therefore increases their determination to be part of the organisation. Your attitude throughout will come under close scrutiny of the assessing staff. Be yourself and give your all.



    Royal Marine Fitness Assessment (RMFA)

    8. The RMFA consists of the following exercises:

    a. Progressive shuttle run (the Bleep Test).

    b. Press ups

    c. Sit ups

    d. Pull ups

    All tests are conducted to an audible timing whereby you complete an exercise to a bleep, as instructed and demonstrated, and record a score when you can no longer maintain the set rhythm. Each teat has a maximum total of 400. The pass mark is 180 and if you fail to achieve this mark you will be withdrawn from the course. Repetitions are counted and recorded by the training team.

    9. The important distinction between completing exercises whilst training and during the test is the ability to keep in time with the set rhythm. For the first 3 tests a repetition is conducted approximately every second with a pause at the full range of each movement. A 2-3 minute break between each serial allows for a brief rest and a thorough explanation and demonstration of the next test.

    10. The maximum repetitions attainable are as follows:

    a. Press ups 60

    b. Sit ups 85

    c. Pull ups 16

    d. Progressive shuttle Run (the Bleep Test) 15.5.

    11. You should aim for maximum scores on all the tests and not just to achieve a marginal pass. Your attitude and work rate in the gym will be closely monitored and a less than determined approach may detract from a good RMFA score in the final grading.
     
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  2. PRMBenjey1993

    PRMBenjey1993 New Member

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    POC Scoring/requirements?

    It's probably somewhere around her but I can't find the thread
    What exactly are the requirments for POC, and what's the scoring system like in relation to a PRMC?

    Also if anyone could tell me exactly what will happen on the POC, academic and written stuff included, that would be a great help.
     
  3. cameron687

    cameron687 New Member

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    Passed PJFT
    Hey ninja was just a bit curious to know if there is any way of getting hold of a poc booklet that you refer to a lot, I've been to my local AFCO and talked about joining as an officer ect and basically said to come back at the beginning of year 13 to make sure I'm getting the grades ect and to get me started, the guy gave me a normal marines booklet and the aib booklet but not the poc one

    Thanks cam
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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  5. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    LATEST RM POTENTIAL OFFICERS COURSE (POC) BRIEF

    FOR CANDIDATES,ATTENDING THE POTENTIAL OFFICERS? COURSE AT COMMANDO TRAINING CENTRE
    ROYAL MARINES

    In order to maintain their very high standards, the Royal Marines use a tough screening process to select Young Officers for training. However you have been selected because we think you have shown the qualities that suggest that you are capable of becoming a Royal Marines Officer.

    There are 2 stages:

    1. The Potential Officers Course
    2. The Admiralty Interview Board

    Candidates who pass the first stage are allowed to go forward to the second. Following successful completion of the Admiralty Interview Board, a Final Selection Board (which meets near the end of July) will decide who will be offered a RM Commission

    POTENTIAL OFFICERS COURSE (POC)1

    The next step on your journey to becoming a Royal Marines Officer is to pass the Potential Officers? Course (POC) which is held at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines at Lympstone in Devon.

    The course is designed to see whether you are likely to meet the challenge. It is a demanding test of your physical fitness, and we are assessing your determination and commitment.

    But we are looking for a little more than that: your leadership potential and intelligence, how you communicate and whether you can keep a sense of humour even when exhausted. Can you think on your feet when the going gets tough?

    The POC also gives you the opportunity to find out more about us. By the end, you will have had a taste of life as a Young Officer in training. It is also a unique chance to learn a lot about yourself and your strengths and weaknesses.

    The base is situated on the banks of the Exe estuary, 8 miles south-east of Exeter. Courses run approximately twice a month throughout the year increasing in frequency between March and July.

    The POC lasts for 2? days starting at 0900 on Monday to lunchtime Wednesday.

    Before you arrive:

    You will receive comprehensive joining instructions 3 ? 4 weeks prior to the course providing all administrative details and a rail warrant if you requested one. If you want to give your best on the POC, thorough preparation is vital. The POC DVD, available from your Careers Officer,

    TRAVEL TO THE POC & SETTLING IN

    You are required to arrive at CTCRM no later than 0800 on Monday. Candidates are advised to turn up on the Sunday if travelling some distance. Take this initial opportunity to get to know other members of the course, since you will need to work as a team over the next 48 hours.

    Passing the POC is about meeting a standard ? the standard demanded of a potential Royal Marines Officer ? not competing with the others. You will be met by the Course Supervisor in the Mess at 0900 for an informal brief prior to the course commencing.

    Once you have been briefed by the Course Supervisor you will be issued with kit and then have your course photograph taken. This is followed by a presentation from the Course Officer detailing the content of the POC which you will experience over the following 2 days.

    THE COURSE ITSELF

    Day 1

    Royal Marines Fitness Assessment (RMFA) ? Gym Tests You will move to the gymnasium to undertake the Royal Marines Fitness Assessment (RMFA).

    To begin with, the Physical Training Staff will brief you on the way you will be expected to conduct yourself during the RMFA.

    The Assessment consists of the following:

    Progressive Shuttle Run (the ?Bleep? Test) - You will run between 2 lines, 20 metres apart, at a pace dictated by bleeps, beginning at ?level 1?. Each level has several ?shuttles? at the same pace and the pace quickens at the start of each new level.

    Although part of the overall RMFA, this test has a separate pass mark and you must keep up with the bleeps and reach level 11.0 as a minimum. Failure to reach the minimum requirement of level 11.0 will result in you being sent home.

    A result of ?level 15 shuttle 5? will gain maximum points for the purposes of the RMFA. The first few levels serve as the warm up for the Shuttle Run itself.

    The test is progressive and maximal. Candidates must take care to wear non-slip trainers to aid turning at the end of each shuttle.

    Press-up Test ? The duration of the test is 2 minutes, 60 press-ups will get you maximum points. The body must be kept straight at all times, the chest will be lowered to meet another student?s fist, you must then fully lock out the arms on the upward motion. Your hands will be shoulder width apart and your elbows must be kept into your side, not resting the knees at any time. Poor form will result in repetitions being deducted and you will be stopped.

    Sit-up Test ? Once again the test will last for 2 minutes, 85 repetitions will get you maximum points. Your feet will be held by a partner, your elbows and shoulders must make contact with the mat on the rearward motion and the elbows must come up to touch the knees on the upward motion. Your knees must be kept together at all times. Poor form will result in repetitions being deducted and you will be stopped.

    Pull-up Test ? This exercise will be carried out on the wooden beam. You will adopt an ?overhand grasp? your body will hang straight and then be pulled up until your chin is over the beam. The exercise will be done to the commands of ?bend and stretch? this is to ensure strictness and prevent the use of momentum. Your legs are to remain uncrossed throughout the exercise. You will be told to ?drop off? if you do not stay in time with the commands or for poor repetitions. To gain maximum points you must achieve 16 repetitions.

    All 4 RMFA tests have a maximum score of 100 points each. The minimum RMFA pass mark is 180 out of 400 points.

    The higher mark achieved on the RMFA will give you a stronger chance of passing Day 2. Any candidate scoring below 180 points on the overall RMFA will be withdrawn from the course.

    Essay and Interview

    Next, the emphasis changes from physical to mental prowess, as you will write a short essay on a current affairs topic. You will be given a choice of at least 4 subjects, a time limit of 1 hour and a maximum of 2 sides of A4. What we are looking for ? apart from accurate grammar and spelling ? is your ability to reason, justify your arguments and communicate clearly on paper.

    Your knowledge of current defence related issues is important. As a Royal Marines Officer you could be involved in one of them, not just read about it in the papers. During the essay the Course Officer or Assisting Officer will take each candidate aside for a short individual interview. This will help them get to know you, assess your level of corps knowledge and to find out why you want to join the Royal Marines as an Officer.

    Drinks in the Officers' Mess

    The first day ends with a chance to meet Young Officers currently under training. Over a drink or two in the Mess, they will tell you at first hand about the challenges and rewards of training.

    Make the most of the opportunity to talk to them. If you do, you will get more of a flavour of what might lie ahead if you pass the POC. After dinner the rest of the evening is free. It is wise to get an early night before the second day.

    Day 2

    Confidence Tests & Assault Course

    After breakfast, you will be met by the Course Supervisor and taken for a thorough warm up prior to beginning the morning?s physical activities. You will then receive a demonstration of the ?Commando Slide? and ?Punch into the Net? obstacles of the ?Tarzan Assault Course?. The course will then be expected to complete both obstacles, allowing the POC staff to gauge candidates? confidence to operate effectively at height. The course will then be lead to the bottom field where they will receive a demonstration of how to tackle each obstacle on the Assault Course. On completion of the demonstration it will be your turn to do a ?Timed run?.

    On completion you will be split into teams for the log race, where each team has to carry a log around the course without it touching the ground. For some of the obstacles, you will be the team leader, for others a team member ? and on other obstacles there will be no leader designated. First you will have a short time in which to work out how you are going to tackle each obstacle.

    You will then have to brief your team clearly and positively before putting your plan into action. It will test your drive and assertiveness, how well you communicate under
    pressure, and how well you work as a team member when someone else is leading.

    Next you will undertake some log exercises within your teams. We are looking for leaders with good communication skills and high levels of physical and psychological robustness.

    Next you will undertake 2 Fireman?s carries ? 200m and 100m to be completed as fast as you can. To obtain maximum marks you need to complete the 200m in 60 seconds and the 100mn in 29 seconds.

    Finally you will attempt to carry out a technique of getting back onto a horizontal rope called ?a regain? over a water obstacle.

    You will then get cleaned up and eat a pasta lunch in the Officers? Mess. After a strenuous morning you are encouraged to use this meal as an opportunity to fuel and fully hydrate your body prior to the afternoon?s activities. It is essential that you eat and drink as much as you can throughout the course, otherwise your body will run out of fuel.

    Lecturette

    For a Royal Marines Officer, the ability to communicate with others is vital. With this in mind, you will be expected to deliver a three-minute lecturette to your fellow course members in a classroom.

    The subject will be the same for all candidates ? ?YOU? ? and you will not be allowed to use visual aids during the lecturette. The lecturette is designed to allow the POC staff to assess your ability to articulate and project your views confidently to a small audience.

    Careful planning is needed to do yourself justice in only three minutes.

    Endurance Course

    Following another quick change you will be taken to the local training area on Woodbury Common, four miles from Lympstone, for the start of the Endurance Course at 1300 hrs. The course runs over two and a half miles of cross-country terrain where you will negotiate tunnels and water obstacles which include the sheep dip (submerged tunnel) This is immediately followed by a ?Hare and Hounds? race, where you will attempt to catch up with a member of the Training Team running at the front of the group.

    The final three miles are conducted as a squad run through the lanes back to CTCRM at 8 minute mile pace, don?t be surprised if the pace quickens towards the end. During the course you will undergo various determination exercises to test your commitment and resolve. You will be expected to keep going whilst displaying a sense of humour, as you will be wet, cold and fatigued.

    Discussion Exercise

    The final assessed activity on the POC is the Discussion Exercise, which takes place in the Officers? Mess. Controversial and topical issues are put forward for the group to debate. You are expected to participate fully and explain the reasoning behind the comments you make and expand upon other members? ideas. In this exercise we are observing your interpersonal skills

    ? how you articulate your point of view, how you listen to others and how you react to someone who disagrees with you.
    Remember that if you do not become involved, it is difficult for us to form a view on your qualities in this area.

    By 1630 the formally assessed phase of the course is complete. The rest of the afternoon and evening is spent cleaning the equipment you were issued on Monday and relaxing in the Officers Mess.

    Day 3

    Battle Swimming Test

    The first event of the final day is the Battle Swimming Test. Your performance in this test is not assessed; it is included in the POC so you can gain an insight into other physical aspects of training. Although swimming can be taught at CTCRM in training, it is beneficial for you to arrive with some ability particularly at breaststroke.

    If not a strong swimmer, a candidate should consider swimming lessons.

    Presentations

    Next follows a comprehensive presentation that concentrates on Royal Marines Young Officer training. You will also be briefed on Royal Marines careers, specialisations and methods of entry.

    FINAL INTERVIEW & RESULT

    The POC ends with a final interview in which the Course Officer or Assisting Officer will give you your POC result. He will take you through your strengths and weaknesses over the POC.

    You will be given one of 3 possible results:

    Pass POC - You have been recommended to attend AIB.

    Fail POC - You are advised to come back on another POC, for a further attempt, after a period of time.

    Fail POC - You have been assessed as unsuitable for a
    commission in the Royal Marines.

    Whichever the outcome, you will receive a comprehensive brief from the Course Supervisor of your performance throughout POC. He will identify areas of strengths and weaknesses which will be used to formulate a future individual training programme.

    The Course Officer will also brief those successful candidates of the Admiral Interview Board (AIB). After this debrief, by about midday, you will be free to leave. You are welcome to stay for lunch if you wish.

    SUMMARY

    The POC is a tough assessment. Royal Marine Officer training is amongst the hardest in the world. Thorough physical and mental preparation will give you the best chance of success.

    Your ability to pass or fail lies with you. By attending a Potential Officers Course you will have had the chance to prove to us that you have got what it takes to become a Royal Marines Officer. But, just as important, you will have proved it to yourself.

    You should remember that despite the early emphasis on physical prowess, a career as a Royal Marines Officer is very much about your effective intellect.
     
  6. DhobiWanKenobi

    DhobiWanKenobi Royal Marines Commando

    Joined:
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    Ninja, a POC candidate recently told me they were required to do a planning exercise after the essay/interview. Any idea if this will be a permanent addition to the course?
     
  7. JMC

    JMC New Member

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    Thanks for the update Ninja.

    Quivering with excitement now, and it is a long way off!
     
  8. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    There is a planning exercise on the AIB but I wouldn't be surprised if it becomes a fixture on POC - there will always be a degree of variance/fluidity on these courses as they permanently evolve.
     
  9. jg332

    jg332 New Member

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    Hi all

    Ninja - any chance of a look at this POC training programme; the 6 week one that you/the booklet refers to? Just would like to see what it says as early as possible, I am still waiting for my date to come through for POC.

    Thanks
     
  10. jg332

    jg332 New Member

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    Actually just found your post in another thread detailing potential regime for training,

    thanks
     
  11. MusserGoat

    MusserGoat Member

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    Passed AIB
    @Ninja_Stoker Any changes or updates? Also like the PRMC date thread, any chance of POC/AIB dates? I know this is a cheeky question ;)
     
  12. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    I'll do a bit of digging tomorrow.
     
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  13. fattyboombatty

    fattyboombatty Member

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    Is anyone able to briefly outline whats in the 6 week training programme in the POC booklet?

    Whilst i'm not applying as an officer I'm interested to see what the recommendation is to candidates that are physically assessed more harshly than other ranks - Perhaps it will give me some ideas for my own training!
     
  14. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    "Latest" POC briefing notes.

    This is the current brief which doesn't look to have changed for about 7 or more years. Possibly it needs a review:

    The Potential Officers’ Course (POC) is held at the Commando Training Centre Royal Marines at Lympstone in Devon.

    The course is designed to see whether you are likely to meet the challenge. It is a demanding test of your physical fitness, and we are assessing your determination and commitment, but we are looking for a little more than that:

    • Your leadership potential and intelligence, how you communicate and whether you can keep a sense of humour even when exhausted. Can you think on your feet when the going gets tough?
    • The POC also gives you the opportunity to find out more about us. By the end, you will have had a taste of life as a Young Officer in training. It is also a unique chance to learn a lot about yourself and your strengths and weaknesses.
    • The base is situated on the banks of the Exe estuary, 8 miles south-east of Exeter.
    • The Courses run approximately twice a month throughout the year increasing in frequency between March and July. The POC lasts for 2½ days starting at 0900 on Monday to lunchtime Wednesday.
    • You will receive comprehensive joining instructions at least 3 – 4 weeks prior to the course providing all administrative details and e-tickets. If you want to give your best on the POC, thorough preparation is vital.
    • You are required to arrive at CTCRM no later than 0800 on Monday. C’s are advised to turn up on the Sunday if travelling some distance. Take this initial opportunity to get to know other members of the course, since you will need to work as a team over the next 48 hours. Passing the POC is about meeting a standard – the standard demanded of a potential Royal Marines Officer – not competing with the others. You will be met by the Course Supervisor in the Mess at 0900 for an informal brief prior to the course commencing. Once you have been briefed by the Course Supervisor you will be issued with kit and then have your course photograph taken. This is followed by a presentation from the Course Officer detailing the content of the POC which you will experience over the following 2 days.
    Day 1:

    Royal Marines Fitness Assessment (RMFA) – Gym Tests:

    You will move to the gymnasium to undertake the Royal Marines Fitness Assessment (RMFA). To begin with, the Physical Training Staff will brief you on the way you will be expected to conduct yourself during the RMFA. The Assessment consists of the following:

    ·Progressive Shuttle Run (the ‘Bleep’ Test) – You will run between 2 lines, 20 metres apart, at a pace dictated by bleeps, beginning at ‘level 1’. Each level has several ‘shuttles’ at the same pace and the pace quickens at the start of each new level. Although part of the overall RMFA, this test has a separate pass mark and you must keep up with the bleeps and reach level 11.0 as a minimum. Failure to reach the minimum requirement of level 11.0 will result in you being sent home. A result of ‘level 15 shuttle 5’ will gain maximum points for the purposes of the RMFA. The first few levels serve as the warm-up for the Shuttle Run itself. The test is progressive and maximal. C’s must take care to wear non-slip trainers to aid turning at the end of each shuttle.

    ·Press-up Test – The duration of the test is 2 minutes, 60 press-ups will get you maximum points. The body must be kept straight at all times, the chest will be lowered to meet another student’s fist, and you must then fully lock out the arms on the upward motion. Your hands will be shoulder width apart and your elbows must be kept into your side, not resting the knees at any time. Poor form will result in repetitions being deducted and you will be stopped.

    ·Sit-up Test – Once again the test will last for 2 minutes, 85 repetitions will get you maximum points. Your feet will be held by a partner, your elbows and shoulders must make contact with the mat on the rearward motion and the elbows must come up to touch the knees on the upward motion. Your knees must be kept together at all times. Poor form will result in repetitions being deducted and you will be stopped.

    ·Pull-up Test – This exercise will be carried out on the wooden beam. You will adopt an “overhand grasp” your body will hang straight and then be pulled up until your chin is over the beam. The exercise will be done to the commands of “bend and stretch” this is to ensure strictness and prevent the use of momentum. Your legs are to remain uncrossed throughout the exercise. You will be told to “drop off” if you do not stay in time with the commands or for poor repetitions. To gain maximum points you must achieve 16 repetitions.

    ·All 4 RMFA tests have a maximum score of 100 points each. The minimum RMFA pass mark is 180 out of 400 points. The higher mark achieved on the RMFA will give you a stronger chance of passing Day 2. Any C scoring below 180 points on the overall RMFA will be withdrawn from the course.

    Essay and Interview

    Next, the emphasis changes from physical to mental prowess, as you will write a short essay on a current affairs topic. You will be given a choice of at least 4 subjects, a time limit of 1 hour and a maximum of 2 sides of A4. What we are looking for – apart from accurate grammar and spelling – is your ability to reason, justify your arguments and communicate clearly on paper. Your knowledge of current defence related issues is important. As a Royal Marines Officer you could be involved in one of them, not just read about it in the papers. During the essay the Course Officer or Assisting Officer will take each candidate aside for a short individual interview. This will help them get to know you, assess your level of corps knowledge and to find out why you want to join the Royal Marines as an Officer.

    Drinks in the Officers’ Mess

    The first day ends with a chance to meet Young Officers currently under training. Over a drink or 2 in the Mess, they will tell you at first hand about the challenges and rewards of training. Make the most of the opportunity to talk to them. If you do, you will get more of a flavour of what might lie ahead if you pass the POC. After dinner the rest of the evening is free. It is wise to get an early night before the second day.

    Day 2:

    Confidence Tests & Assault Course

    After breakfast, you will be met by the Course Supervisor and taken for a thorough warm up prior to beginning the morning’s physical activities. You will then receive a demonstration of the “Commando Slide” and “Punch into the Net” obstacles of the “Tarzan Assault Course”. The course will then be expected to complete both obstacles, allowing the POC staff to gauge C’s confidence to operate effectively at height. The course will then be lead to the bottom field where they will receive a demonstration of how to tackle each obstacle on the Assault Course. On completion of the demonstration it will be your turn to do a ‘Timed run’.

    On completion you will be split into teams for the log race, where each team has to carry a log around the course without it touching the ground. For some of the obstacles, you will be the team leader, for others a team member – and on other obstacles there will be no leader designated. First you will have a short time in which to work out how you are going to tackle each obstacle. You will then have to brief your team clearly and positively before putting your plan into action. It will test your drive and assertiveness, how well you communicate under pressure, and how well you work as a team member when someone else is leading.

    Next you will undertake some log exercises within your teams. We are looking for natural leaders with good communication skills and high levels of physical and psychological robustness.

    Next you will undertake 2 Fireman’s carries – 200m and 100m to be completed as fast as you can. To obtain maximum marks you need to complete the 200m in 60 seconds and the 100m in 29 seconds.

    Finally you will attempt to carry out a technique of getting back onto a horizontal rope called ‘a regain’ over a water obstacle.

    You will then get cleaned up and eat a pasta lunch in the Officers’ Mess. After a strenuous morning you are encouraged to use this meal as an opportunity to fuel and fully hydrate your body prior to the afternoon’s activities.

    It is essential that you eat and drink as much as you can throughout the course, otherwise your body will run out of fuel.
     
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  15. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Lecturette

    For a Royal Marines Officer, the ability to communicate with others is vital. With this in mind, you will be expected to deliver a 3 minute lecturette to your fellow course members in a classroom. The subject will be the same for all – ‘YOU’ – and you will not be allowed to use visual aids during the lecturette. The lecturette is designed to allow the POC staff to assess your ability to articulate and project your views confidently to a small audience. Careful planning is needed to do yourself justice in only 3 minutes.

    Endurance Course

    Following another quick change you will be taken to the local training area on Woodbury Common, 4 miles from Lympstone, for the start of the Endurance Course at 1300 hrs. The course runs over 2 and a half miles of cross-country terrain where you will negotiate tunnels and water obstacles which include the sheep dip (submerged tunnel) This is immediately followed by a ‘Hare and Hounds’ race, where you will attempt to catch up with a member of the Training Team running at the front of the group. The final 3 miles are conducted as a squad run through the lanes back to CTCRM at 8 minute mile pace, don’t be surprised if the pace quickens towards the end. During the course you will undergo various determination exercises to test your commitment and resolve. You will be expected to keep going whilst displaying a sense of humour, as you will be wet, cold and fatigued.

    Discussion Exercise

    The final assessed activity on the POC is the Discussion Exercise, which takes place in the Officers’ Mess. Controversial and topical issues are put forward for the group to debate. You are expected to participate fully and explain the reasoning behind the comments you make and expand upon other members’ ideas. In this exercise we are observing your interpersonal skills – how you articulate your point of view, how you listen to others and how you react to someone who disagrees with you. Remember that if you do not become involved, it is difficult for us to form a view on your qualities in this area.

    End stage: By 1630 the formally assessed phase of the course is complete. The rest of the afternoon and evening is spent cleaning the equipment you were issued on Monday and relaxing in the Officers Mess.

    Day 3:

    Battle Swimming Test

    The first event of the final day is the Battle Swimming Test. Your performance in this test is not assessed; it is included in the POC so you can gain an insight into other physical aspects of training. Although swimming can be taught at CTCRM in training, it is beneficial for you to arrive with some ability particularly at breaststroke. If not a strong swimmer, a C should consider swimming lessons.

    Presentations

    Next follows a comprehensive presentation that concentrates on Royal Marines Young Officer training. You will also be briefed on Royal Marines careers, specialisations and methods of entry.

    Final Interview and Result

    The POC ends with a final interview in which the Course Officer or Assisting Officer will give you your POC result. He will take you through your strengths and weaknesses over the POC. You will be given one of 3 possible results:

    a.Pass POC - You have been recommended to attend AIB.

    b.Fail POC - You are advised to come back on another POC, for a further attempt, after a period of time.

    c.Fail POC - You have been assessed as unsuitable for a commission in the Royal Marines.

    Whichever the outcome, you will receive a comprehensive brief from the Course Supervisor of your performance throughout POC. He will identify areas of strengths and weaknesses which will be used to formulate a future individual training programme.

    The Course Officer will also brief those successful C of the Admiral Interview Board (AIB). After this debrief, by about midday, you will be free to leave. You are welcome to stay for lunch if you wish.

    A successful result at POC will exempt the candidate from undertaking the PRMC course if an RMOR application is made. This exemption lasts 12 months from the POC completion date.

    Summary

    The POC is a tough assessment. Royal Marine Officer training is amongst the hardest in the world. Thorough physical and mental preparation will give you the best chance of success. Your ability to pass or fail lies with you. By attending a Potential Officers Course you will have had the chance to prove to us that you have got what it takes to become a Royal Marines Officer. But, just as important, you will have proved it to yourself. You should remember that despite the early emphasis on physical prowess, a career as a Royal Marines Officer is very much about your effective intellect.
     
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  16. crackers1234

    crackers1234 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2015
    Posts:
    35
    @Ninja_Stoker is there still a requirement to attend a medical at a civilian GP?
     
  17. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2007
    Posts:
    29,911
    All applicants undergo a medical examination with a contracted civilian Doctor as part of the selection process. There is lots of different advice about the medical in the stickies subforum.
     
  18. Rover

    Rover Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Posts:
    2,223
    An old video with relevant points covering the POC even today.


     
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