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Life as a YO in training

Discussion in 'POC Section' started by stroll147, Apr 29, 2020.

  1. stroll147

    stroll147 Guest

    Hello all,

    I am just wondering about life as a YO in training, any information at all is appreciated such as:
    - free time stuff
    - general day-to-day
    - excercises
    - fitness
    - training
    - commando tests + bottom field & gym passouts
    - what they usually do on weekends
    - how long in classrooms
    - how long in field
    - how many fail and why do they

    Anything whatsoever is appreciated.

    Thanks!

    (could an admin please change the thread name from an to as, my mistake sorry)
     
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  2. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    YOs do not post on here once they start their training, as they are strongly advised to stay away from social media. We do have some parents of YOs on here who may contribute, but generally speaking anything you may gather will be pure speculation.

    The Commando Tests are exactly the same for YOs as they are for ORs, except they have faster times. Use the search function to find out more.

    Alan
     
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  3. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    As stated by @Caversham an insight into daily life is often tricky to source. On a more general note the tale of the September 1991 Batch is described in Robin Eggar's book 'Survival of the Fittest'.

    The book is now about thirty years out of date from the perspective of the training pipeline but it focuses more on the relentless psychological pressure of the Royal Marines YO training. For example, two of the Corps Commission members of that Batch had been awarded the King's Badge during Recruit Training. And yet they both had their own struggles after an initial flying start. One spent most of his YO training on a Camp Commandant's Warning for numerous shortcomings.

    Unsurprisingly the book is out of print but available from online sources and also from one's local library. Ask for an inter-library loan which costs about 75p.

    eggar.jpg
     
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  4. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    I have attached the book in PDF format. You can change it to epub with Calibre or similar.
     

    Attached Files:

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  5. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Nice one! :)
     
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  6. TheRents

    TheRents Valuable Contributor

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    @stroll147

    Welcome I will try to give you a flavour of YO training but obviously, as a parent, I only lived it vicariously!

    Free time - In term one, not very much at all. If you think you have free time, you are probably not doing something you should be doing. As the training progresses you will get more free time often Saturday pm and Sunday, but again if you have an exercise starting on Monday you will need to be ready.

    General day to day - after the initial 'shock of capture' phase, as for the guys in RT, your day will normally start with breakfast and then phys, eg gym, runs, bottom field etc. Lectures can be mixed thru the day with other stuff or in sometimes in blocks of a week. Dinner when on camp is in the Mess. You have to be changed and ready to eat and later you have the option of going to 9ers'.

    Exercises - First Step 2 Days, First Stop 5 days, Lost Tribe 5 days, Tenderfoot 5days, Eye Opener 5days, Softly Softly 6 days, Sand Strike 5 days and into Long Night 6 days, Eagle Eye 5 days, Jagged Edge 5 days, Dragon Storm 6 days, Open Door 2 days, Rourkes Drift 5 days, Crash Action 3 continuous weeks, the Saturday to deservice and straight into Commando Tests on consecutive days, Wet Raider 5 days and into Virginia Tempest 4 weeks, Steadfast Warrior 5 days and lastly Final Nail 2 weeks (hoofing)

    Weekends- If you are finished by Saturday lunchtime or sometimes Friday evening, the weekend is yours, like RT, privileges are earned throughout training so as time goes on you will have more freedom and can have guests to stay in the mess.

    Unique to the RM you are Commissioned on Day 1, you are expected to show a level of judgement appropriate for an officer. You have your own pass and are free to come and go from CTC as you choose (evenings and weekends)

    The batch will consist of Direct Entrants (Corps Commission), grad and non grad entrants and some overseas YO's. Ages range from 18 to 26 years old. Social background is very mixed.

    Numbers recently have varied from 50 to over 60, but in the past have been as low as twenty to as high as seventy.

    The million dollar question - why do they fail ? Some will quit when they get cold and wet, others may decide the military life is not for them, a few on moral issues and finally some will fail on professional standards (right up to month 14!)

    Training is continuously evolving, each Batch will have a different flavour to it, the TT are human (yes really!) and will bring their own style and experience to the programme. Once you have your Green Lid you still have 21 weeks of training to go!

    To sum up, it is definitely a marathon and not a sprint and you will be put under pressure, as never before.

    Is it worth it? absolutely:D
     
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  7. TheRents

    TheRents Valuable Contributor

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    As a note of interest the previous CO of CTCRM Col Mike Tanner was a member of this batch

    At the start of my lads first batch he asked if any of the YO's had read the book, a few hands went up. Glancing around the room he remarked "well it's a good read, but not all true!"
     
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  8. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Yeah, that's because the book keeps suggesting that Mike Tanner was a fat knacker. :)

    Edited to add: Mike Tanner was recently promoted Brigadier.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 30, 2020
  9. anon1234

    anon1234 Well-Known Member

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    Great insight, never heard of these two, do you know what they cover?

    Heard Crash Action is notorious, sounds equally epic and grim!
     
  10. TheRents

    TheRents Valuable Contributor

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    Sand Strike - on the dunes, from memory, taking part in and leading section level attacks.

    Rourkes Drift - defensive position work

    Crash Action - full on, multiple scenarios, hoofing assets . Epic and grim sounds good;)
     
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  11. Flubberdog

    Flubberdog Well-Known Member

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    This is one of the best potted descriptions of YO training you will see. @TheRents and I both had son's in YO 2018 and it is certainly a roller coaster for the lads. Much is expected and seeing the Batch gelling together as a team was a genuine privilege. Seeing them pass out was as well!

    Determination and cheerfulness were two of the keys that unlocked the door. It is achievable and the training team are behind you. Even of you don't think so at times!!
     
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